Chiswick Unbound – A return to rugby

More markets planned for Chiswick

Antiques and Vintage market

There will be an antiques market on Chiswick High Rd next Sunday, 13 December. Jennifer Titmuss, who runs a regular antiques and vintage market in St Albans, has been granted a licence to place stalls in Old Market Place, where Chiswick Flower Market is held, and all along the south side of the High Rd as far as the South Beach shop at 123 Chiswick High Road.

“A monthly antique and vintage market would bring visitors, vibrancy and opportunity to an already popular and atmospheric community, help improve the potential for local shops and businesses, particularly after such a hard and terrible year” Jennifer told LB Hounslow’s licensing committee.

The antiques and vintage market will be held on the second Sunday of every month.

Cheese and provisions markets

Lucy Cufflin, one of the organisers of the Cookbook Festival and regular supper clubs, has put in an application to run food markets on the third and fourth Sundays of the month. With the Chiswick Flower market on the first Sunday of the month, that would mean a market in the High Rd every Sunday.

Lucy’s markets would be confined to the Old Market Place outside Chsiwick Police Station. One would be a cheese market. Chiswick is under served for cheese she thinks, given the incredible variety there is on offer. The other market would be a specialist provisions market.

While there is no shortage of food markets – one which has been running for 21 years at Dukes Meadows and another recently opened at Ravenscourt Park – she thinks there is room for another. What it would bring, she says, is a variety of specialist provisions which you can’t get elsewhere in Chiswick.

Her application is currently being considered by LB Hounslow.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick gets an antiques market

See also: Lucy Cufflin, Co-founder & organiser of the Cookbook Festival – Profile

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Episode 4: Economists’ attack on BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg “grotesquely malign”

A group of economists have taken issue with the BBC’s Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg’s attempt to explain the national budget deficit. She likened the country’s current financial state to that of a domestic household being in debt, which they say is not a good or helpful comparison. Instead of dropping her a quiet email, they’ve complained formally to the BBC’s Director General, thus ensuring that the row goes ballistic as it is whipped up by the BBC’s competitors in the press.

Nigel Dudley, political commentator and long term leader writer for several national papers, says it is “grotesquely malign” of them to do so, in fact “totally despicable”.

David Smith, Economics Editor of the Sunday Times, agrees that the analogy is not a good one, but he agrees with Nigel that the economists, who are all centre-left and believe the current level of budget deficit does not warrant a return to austerity measures, are using the BBC as a whipping boy to get their own agenda on the front pages.

Nigel and David Smith discuss this with Mihir Bose, former BBC Sports Editor. They also talk about the growing clamour by Scots for independence and how they define themselves (British? English? European?) Somewhere along the way they get on to Peter Sellers and whether the Welsh are responsible for the Indian accent.

The three journalists, aka the Three Old Hacks, have been friends since they first met while working at Financial Weekly in 1980s. They have kept in touch regularly, setting the world to rights over various lunches and dinners. With coronavirus making that impossible, what do journalists do, deprived of long convivial lunches over a bottle of red wine or several? Why, podcast of course.


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Listen to more episodes here.

Get in contact with the podcast by emailing threeoldhacks@outlook.com, we’d love to hear from you!

Trufflehound’s ‘Anything but turkey’ Christmas menu

This Christmas is destined to be different. Jo Buckingham, the chef who runs luxury caterer Trufflehound, says breaking with tradition can be liberating and fun. She has embraced this idea with Trufflehound’s ABT (Anything but Turkey) menu, delivered to your door in W4, W12, W6 and W3, no minimum order.

With added layers of luxury Trufflehound’s festive menu naturally includes truffled beef carpaccio with truffled snow (looks like snow, tastes of truffle), lobster and prawn bisque with fresh crab and lobster tails. Mains feature beef Wellington with all the trimmings, ‘including our famous seven hour jus’ or confit duck with smoked mash, port and cranberry sauce and apricot stuffing.

“Cooked to perfection, with mouth-watering sauces and subtle and exciting mixes of taste…it is sheer culinary joy without any hassle, and incredibly good value” Client W4.

Ready to order?

For the full menu, go to Trufflehound’s website

trufflehoundcatering.com or their Instagram feed #T/HDiningClub

To order, ring Jo on 07899 800594 or reach her through the contact page on the website.

Trufflehound Catering launched its Dining Club in October, offering fine dining meals delivered to your door. Owner and chef Jo Buckingham has been providing food for large Chiswick celebrations and fine dining for small groups for the past 16 years.

This page is paid for by Trufflehound Catering.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Griffin Brewery launches 2020 Vintage ale

See also: Christmas gift guide for presents you can buy locally

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Griffin Brewery launches 2020 Vintage ale

For a beer drinker, tasting the new Vintage ale from the Griffin Brewery is a bit like a vintner getting a first swig of Beaujolais Nouveau. It is an annual event, eagerly awaited by the cognoscenti. For Guy Stewart, this year’s first taste was a little nerve wracking. He’s been in brewing for 25 years, but this was his first as Head Brewer at the Griffin Brewery, being in charge of creating the year’s Vintage ale.

“Everything in it is British” he told The Chiswick Calendar. “Last year’s had a New World feel, with New Zealand malt and hops. This year we’ve taken it back to its British roots”.

He’s used Simpsons double roasted crystal malt, and explained to me that the process of malting barley involves allowing the grain to start to germinate, so it releases enzymes into its starch store and it’s the sugar in the barley extract that gives the beer its dark colour.

He’s chosen Target hops, grown in Kent (and also used in London Pride, which gives the beer its bitter taste) paired with Jester hops from Hertfordshire, which gives it a white wine grape note, and Godiva hops, which bring a floral / berry fruit aroma to the mix.

Images: 2020 Fuller’s Vintage ale; Simpson’s malt; photographs Alanna McCrum

Dry run for the 25th anniversary

I asked him how decided on his final combination, and of course, like anything, the answer is experience. Guy worked at Watneys brewery at Mortlake for twenty years and gained another five years with Fuller’s brewery, now owned by the Japanese beer company Asahi. This is not his first Vintage ale. He has been involved in the process many a time before and has a depth of knowledge about what goes well together.

“There have been a lot of pre-orders” he told me “and a lot of excitement, with people waiting to see what it’s going to be”.

Fuller’s has a core range of 15 or 16 beers, most of which have been around for a long time. They’ve been creating an annual Vintage ale since 1997, so it’s good to get one under his belt before he has the pressure of creating the big one, the 25th anniversary ale in 2021.

 

Image: Guy Stewart; photograph Alanna McCrum

“Very nice” says John Keeling

The Beer advocate website says it’s ‘outstanding’, giving it a score of 94. Guy is particularly pleased that John Keeling, who retired as head brewer at Fuller’s in 2018, told him it was “very nice”, which Guy says is high praise indeed.

Fuller’s Vintage Ale is available mostly as a limited release of individually packaged and numbered bottles. Some people drink it straight away. Others let it improve and keep it for a special occasion, like a fine wine or whisky. It was launched in mid October, but since the Griffin Brewery shop has just reopened, you can go and buy it direct from the brewery. The shop is on the east side of the brewery, on Chiswick Lane South (accessible by car from Chiswick Mall).

It retails at £6.00 a bottle. A collection box with three bottles – the 2018, 2019 and 2020 vintages, will set you back £25.

Owners of a Chiswick Calendar Club Card get 10% off everything in the shop. Open 2.00 – 6.00pm, Monday – Friday and 12.00 – 6.00pm on Saturdays.

Image above: Brewery bike; photograph by Alanna McCrum

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Boat Race 2021 moved away from River Thames

See also: Low Traffic Neighbourhood decisions sent back to LB Hounslow Cabinet

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Traffic cameras go live in Fisher’s Lane and Grove Park

Low Traffic Neighbourhood decisions sent back to LB Hounslow Cabinet

Cabinet member called a ‘liar’ and told to resign

LB Hounslow’s Scrutiny Committee has demanded that the council look again at the decisions it has made on Low Traffic Neighbourhoods.

After an acrimonious meeting last week in which Labour councillor Richard Eason called for the resignation of his Labour colleagues, Cllr Khan and Cllr Katherine Dunne and Chiswick Conservative Cllr Ron Mushiso accused Cllr Khan of lying, the Scrutiny committee has thrown the whole decision making process back to Cabinet to be discussed tonight (Tuesday 8 December).

LB Hounslow is due to start an interim review of the controversial Low Traffic Neighbourhood schemes they introduced in the summer, on Wednesday 9 December. They commissioned a report by an independent urban planning consultancy, Steer, which the key decision making councillors: Cabinet Member for Transport Cllr Hanif Khan, Cabinet Member for Communities Cllr Katherine Dunne and Cabinet Member for Highways, Cllr Guy Lambert will discuss with the council’s traffic management officers, along with the feedback from residents they’ve received as part of the public consultation.

The Scrutiny committee has demanded they throw the whole process open to ‘proper’ consultation. The report by the Scrutiny committee chairman Cllr. Khulique Malik says the decisions were made with inadequate consultation with either ward councillors or ‘stakeholders’.

‘Proper’ consultation needed

Cllr Malik calls for ‘adequate and proper consultation as part of the interim and final review’ of Streetspace phases 1 and 2 (which include Turnham Green Terrace, Deconshire Rd and south Chiswick schemes) and ‘comprehensive consultations’ on the next phase of Streetspace initiatives, (which would include Low Traffric Neighbourhoods in Bedford Park).

Two key decisions were made by the Cabinet members on 20 October: that they should approve the process for undertaking interim and final reviews on Streetspace schemes themselves, and that they should consider and approve, in principle, the proposed phase 3 Streetspace schemes (yet to be designed).

Both Labour Cllr Richard Eason and Chiswick’s Conservative Cllr John Todd ‘called in’ those decisions, saying that they were too big for a handful of Cabinet members to make by themselves, without proper consultation with ward councillors and residents.

Cllr Malik’s report found there had not had adequate consultation prior to the decision. ‘The Committee considered that ward councillors had not been consulted properly nor had stakeholders, people who are digitally excluded and people with protected characteristics’.

They found that there was ‘inadequate evidence’ on which to base the decision. The Committee believed modelling should have been done prior to the decision.

They found that the action was ‘not proportionate to the desired outcome’. Based on the evidence, the Committee found that in the design of phase 3, local need and impact should be considered.

They also found that potentially there is the basis for a challenge on the grounds of equalities or human rights. Based on the evidence they received, the Committee considered the equality impact assessment was ‘inadequate’.

Images above: Cllr Katherine Dunne; Cllr Guy Lambert; Cllr Hanif Khan

Cabinet must reconsider

They have asked Hounslow’s Cabinet to consider the following:

On carrying out the interim and final reviews of the Low Traffic Neighbourhood schemes, they should ensure ‘adequate and proper consultation’, including:

  • use an organisation that is a member of the Market Research Society for the consultations;
  • ensure that digitally excluded people and people with protected characteristics are enabled to participate fully in all the consultations;
  • embrace the value of ‘Passing on the power’ and deepen the organisation’s approach to engagement by using different methods to engage the public;
  • provide feedback or reports on the methods used to engage the public in these reviews.

These were all points raised by Cllr Joanna Biddolph at the Scrutiny committee meeting on 30 November.

On considering and approving, in principle, the proposed phase 3 Streetspace schemes, they should ensure comprehensive consultations on the overall policy and individual schemes by setting out the consultation approach as well as:

  • appoint an independent organisation that is a member of the Market Research Society to lead the consultation to select the schemes;
  • provide the evidence of the need or desire for the scheme and listen to local voices;
  • ensure that ward councillors, as local community leaders, other local community leaders, and stakeholders are informed and engaged in the phase 3 development and roll-out;
  • provide mechanisms for emergency rapid reviews of these schemes; and
  • set out the learnings, including but not limited to the unintended consequences identified from previous implementations, and use these to inform phase 3 consultations and implementation.
  • conduct traffic modelling of each LTN individually and collectively, to determine the possible impact on neighbouring areas as well as on the wider area, and publish the outcomes of the modelling before a decision is made;
  • take into account the equalities and human rights impacts through a deep consideration of the impacts of each scheme, this should be actively sought, documented and monitored.

The Scrutiny Committee report has been added to the agenda for the Cabinet meeting on Tuesday 8 December for its urgent consideration.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Review of Turnham Green Terrace traffic restrictions starts 9 December

See also: Traffic cameras go live in Fisher’s Lane and Grove Park

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Review of Turnham Green Terrace traffic restrictions starts 9 December

We should hear soon whether LB Hounslow will abandon the decision it made in the summer to close Turnham Green Terrace to no through traffic. At the moment the road is open, pending a review of the scheme.

All the Low Traffic Neighbourhood decisions which were implemented under the Government’s emergency measures have by law to be reviewed after six months. They are also subject to an interim review, which is due now (actually overdue, but the council says they deliberately put off the review so they could assess the impact on traffic of schools reopening in September).

LB Hounslow commissioned a report by  an independent urban planning consultancy, Steer, which the Cabinet Member for Transport Hanif Khan expects to be discussing with colleagues on Wednesday (9 December). He has told The Chiswick Calendar that the review process will start then.

The traffic restrictions, particularly the closure of Turnham Green Terrace, have caused uproar.

More than 7,000 people have received penalty notices for driving the length of Turnham Green Terrace since the road was first closed in the summer. Many of them said they hadn’t realised the road was closed, saying they either didn’t see the signs or didn’t understand them.

Traders in Turnham Green Terrace and in Devonshire Rd, where similar changes were introduced, have complained that they have lost business because customers can no longer park to shop.

More than 8,500 people signed a petition against the changes to Turnham Green Terrace and Fisher’s Lane. While one woman took to walking up and down the Terrace with a placard, warning drivers about the fines, another man was spoken to by the police after took to social media saying the councilllors who took the decision needed shooting.

The decision to make Turnham Green Terrace a no through route was made under the emergency powers given to councils by the Government to create more space for walking and cycling. No entry ‘except for disabled, local buses, taxis and for access’ signs were installed at both ends of Turnham Green Terrace and at the High Rd entrance to Devonshire Rd in mid-June.

Chiswick’s Conservative councillors tabled a motion of no confidence against Leader of Hounslow Council Steve Curran, which Labour members unanimously voted down. But since then a Labour councillor, Richard Eason, demanded the decisions to be looked at again and called for the resignation of Cabinet Member for Transport Hanif Khan  and Labour colleague Cllr Katherine Dunne.

Cllr Khan hinted to The Chsiwick Calendar on 16 November that he was considering changing the restrictions. When Thames Water roadworks on Acton Lane caused additional traffic on Chiswick High Rd the Council decided to reopen Turnham Green Terrace to through traffic. Since the roadworks finished, the road has remained open pending Cllr Khan’s review. The told us there needed to be a ‘proper rethink‘.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Low Traffic Neighbourhood decisions sent back to LB Hounslow Cabinet

See also: Traffic cameras go live in Fisher’s Lane and Grove Park

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Cheat’s Christmas

December 2020 books

Gardeners World presenter Arit Anderson visits Chiswick Flower Market

BBC Gardeners World presenter Arit Anderson was at Chiswick Flower Market on Sunday. She and about 6,500 other people. I thought I spotted Vanessa Redgrave as well, but couldn’t swear to it. I’ve never been good at celebrity spotting at the best of times, but face masks make it even harder! It must be nice for them to be able to go about their business incognito. Arit had a long career in fashion before becoming a garden designer so her stylishness rather gives her away.

Photographs by Anna Kunst

See more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: The first Chiswick Flower Market in September 2020

See also: The second Chiswick Flower Market in November 2020

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Episode 32: The thrill returns of Ted Dexter at the crease

Cricket authors (and obsessives) Peter Oborne and Richard Heller launched a podcast early in 2020 to help deprived listeners endure a world without cricket. They’re no longer deprived of cricket, but still chat regularly about cricket topics with different guests each week – cricket writers, players, administrators and fans – hoping to keep a good line and length but with occasional wides into other subjects.

In the pomp of his playing days, Ted Dexter filled cricket grounds with spectators. The former Sussex and England captain returns to the crease as the latest guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller in their regular cricket-themed podcast. This also includes an appeal from Mike Atherton for the MCC Foundation. For the week from 1 December donations will be doubled in value, and will help to give cricketing experience and access to coaching for disadvantaged boys and girls. See donate.thebiggive.org.uk Ted has generously donated to the Foundation the royalties from his autobiography 85 Not Out recently published by Quiller.


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Ted recalls one of his most electrifying innings, 70 in the Lord’s Test against the 1963 West Indians, which ended with all four results possible on the last ball, Colin Cowdrey with a broken arm at the non-striker’s end. (He pays tribute to the cool David Allen, who actually received the bowling of Wes Hall.) He was given lbw to Sobers, bowling left-arm over: “with DRS I would have reviewed it.”

Modestly (and wrongly) he denies that he had an aura as a player, but he always set out to the batting crease as if he meant business. Of modern players, he thinks that Virat Kohli, Ben Stokes and Steve Smith inspire awe in their opponents. Bradman in retirement had huge authority, and once silenced him in a memorable encounter.

So far the only Test cricketer to have been born in Milan, Ted speaks of his early life in Italy and then following his father on war service to distant parts of the UK. He pays warm tribute to his father’s support in his career, not least his response to a lordly President of the MCC who had criticized him as captain of the 1962-63 tour of Australia. The peer was a cactus aficionado, and Mr Dexter senior made a graphic suggestion of where his lordship might place a cactus. He discusses his relationship with the Duke of Norfolk, the unexpected manager of that tour. The Duke had once given him tickets to Ascot, and he tells how he hurried to complete victory on the fourth day of a Test against Pakistan so that he could use them on the fifth. He reveals how he himself acquired his unwanted nickname of Lord Ted as a  schoolboy at Radley (a story worthy of P G Wodehouse’s hero Psmith.)

He looks back at his cricket career at Cambridge University (which owed much to his father and older brother) and as an amateur at  Sussex. In his first year in the side, he sent a belated telegram pulling out of a Championship match to pursue a romance in Denmark – a story from a lost world of cricket. That romance came to naught but not long after he courted (to the background of Frank Sinatra’s Songs For Swinging  Lovers) the beautiful model who became his wife of over sixty years. He and she became the most glamorous figures in world cricket and he speaks revealingly about the condition of professional sportsmen’s lives in the new cultural and social era of the Sixties.

As captain of Sussex (despite the romantic AWOL incident), he tells how he won them their first silverware (the initial two Gillette Cups) through his understanding of containment by accurate seam bowling. Although blamed for the long exile of spin bowlers from one-day cricket, he rejoices in the present paramountcy of leg-spinners in T20. He pays a warm tribute to his Sussex partner Jim Parks, a natural athlete. He is proud of his influence (with the aid of chairs) over John Snow’s development as a world-class bowler.

He speaks of his troubled entry into Test cricket  as an emergency replacement  on the losing Australia tour of 1958-59. An insight from another replacement, John Mortimore (primarily a bowler) led to a big redeeming hundred in New Zealand. That Australian tour was marked by no-balling pace bowlers: he discusses the present prevalence of no-balling among spinners.

He gives a robust defence of his record as a selector, especially the non-inclusion of David Gower for the India tour of 1992-93, and of the remarks he made on that losing tour which were mocked in the media. On one issue, the impact of low air quality on players, he thinks himself way ahead of his time. Reviewing his varied initiatives as an administrator, he is most proud of his work with Colin Cowdrey to enshrine the principles of the Spirit of Cricket as a preamble to the Laws.

Get in contact with the podcast by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com, we’d love to hear from you!

Listen to more episodes of Oborne & Heller

Next episode – Episode 33: New Zealand cricket’s long journey to success

Previous Episode – Episode 31: South African cricket and the poisoned legacy of apartheid

Listen to all episodes – Oborne & Heller on Cricket

Peter Oborne & Richard Heller

Peter Oborne has been the chief political commentator for the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, a maker of several documentaries and written and broadcast for many different media. He is the author of a biography of Basil D’Oliveira and of Wounded Tiger, a history of Pakistan cricket, both of which won major awards.

Richard Heller was a long-serving humorous columnist on The Mail on Sunday and more briefly, on The Times. He worked in the movie business in the United States and the UK, including a brief engagement on a motion picture called Cycle Sluts Versus The Zombie Ghouls. He is the author of two cricket-themed novels A Tale of Ten Wickets and The Network. He appeared in two Mastermind finals: in the first his special subject was the life of Sir Gary Sobers.

Oborne & Heller cricketing partnership

Jointly, he and Peter produced White On Green, celebrating the drama of Pakistan cricket, including the true story of the team which lost a first-class match by an innings and 851 runs.

Peter and Richard have played cricket with and against each other for a variety of social sides, including Parliament’s team, the Lords and Commons, and in over twenty countries including India, Pakistan, the United States, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Australia, Zimbabwe, New Zealand and Morocco.

The Podcast is produced by Bridget Osborne and James Willcocks at The Chiswick Calendar.

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Boat Race 2021 moved away from River Thames

Christmas decorations at Chiswick Business Park

Chiswick Park is home to some of the world’s leading companies, including Discovery, Paramount Pictures, IMG, Starbucks, and Pernod Ricard. 2020 marks the 20th anniversary of the business park, which was one of the first to focus on making the working environment somewhere people would really want to spend time.

The 33 acre site houses 75 companies in its 12 buildings, many of them global, European or national headquarters. It was designed around a central pedestrian space, with a lake and an open-air events plaza. The site’s management company Enjoy Work always puts on a show at Christmas and 2020 is no exception.

Photographs by Jennifer Griffiths

View more Chiswick at Christmas galleries on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Christmas has arrived in Park Rd

See also: Silver Crescent & Thorney Hedge Rd Christmas lights

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Christmas trees ‘essential’

People have got the Christmas bug early this year it seems. This weekend was very busy for Wheelers Garden Centre on Turnham Green Terrace.

“We’re selling Christmas decorations earlier than ever. I think people want cheering up” Spencer Wheeler told The Chiswick Calendar.

“Several people have told me they’re going to buy two trees – one that they’ve bought this weekend, which will look a bit sad by Christmas, and then another one to replace it”.

Wheelers is offering Club Card holders 15% off everything in the Garden Centre.

Image above: Wheelers Garden Centre; photograph, Alice Gilkes

Traders have had a hard job keeping up with whether it’s been legal or illegal to sell a Christmas tree. First they were deemed non-essential, then the government realised that supermarkets were selling them legally, as providers of essential goods, as were online delivery companies, unfairly handicapping local traders who rely on the Christmas trade.

Ten days ago (21 November) it became legal for street traders and market traders to sell them, before the end of the national lockdown.

“First I was told I would have to shut down, then I was told it was ok. Madness” says Spencer.

Image above: Wheelers Garden Centre; photograph, Alice Gilkes

Tier 2

On hearing last Thursday that we were officially in Tier 2, Chiswick retailer John Fitzgerald, who runs Snappy Snaps, told The Chiswick Calendar:

“I think it’s a fantastic opportunity to get some trade done between now and Christmas”.

For Brentford FC it means being able to welcome fans to their home ground for the first time to their home match against Blackburn Rovers next Saturday.

You can read up on the Tier 2 rules and regs and what it means for Chiswick here on The Chiswick Calendar website.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: London in Tier 2

See also: Snappy Snaps offers personal framing service online

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

The Chiswick Calendar freebie

Images above: Children’s clothes from Style My Kid

Online children’s clothing company Style My Kid is one of the local independent businesses which features in The Chiswick Calendar Christmas gift guide this year.  They do have some lovely things. Almost enough to make you feel broody!

They are giving away a £25 voucher to be spent on their site. The winner will be picked by random draw out of the emails received by midnight on Friday, 4 December 2020.

Email info@thechiswickcalendar.co.uk with the answer to this question:

Which legendary, fantasy creature features in a pack of three Zoocchini organic face masks on the Style My Kid website?

stylemykid.com

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Mind Matters – Bullying and what to do about it

Be clear about what is and what is not bullying

Research shows that one in every two people are affected by bullying. It is something that people still find very hard to discuss. Research, information, education in schools, employer advice, safety online, children, adults and the elderly are all areas and people where there is some progress, but as our awareness of bullying develops then I think confusion can occur.

Increasingly I think the word can be used incorrectly and it is really important to be clear about whether your or another person’s behaviour is bullying. If used incorrectly misunderstandings can be magnified and conflicts made worse, sometimes partners might accuse each other of bullying as it can justify ending a relationship. However it is also essential not to shy away from the word when bullying is happening.

“No good can come from a person being trapped in bullying and to stop a bully is to also give them a chance to change their behaviour”.

So the first step is to be able to identify bullying. This sounds obvious but in my work I have found that many people have not realised they are being bullied. Meanwhile I also hear people accuse others of bullying behaviour when on closer examination there is actually something else happening.

Bullying can take many forms but in essence it is deliberately setting out to hurt another person either emotionally or physically. It is a pattern of repeated behaviour and one that leads to the bullied person feeling differently about themselves and the world. Threatening behaviour, insults, unfair treatment, gaslighting and excluding are all possible manifestations. It is also something that often occurs to certain people because of factors such as how they appear, a disability, sexuality, gender, race or religion. There is always a purpose to bullying – it will be to make the other person feel bad and / or to get them to behave differently or do something that the bully wants.

BullyingUK is a charity that provides information and advice through their website www.bullying.co.uk and it can give you information whether you are experiencing bullying at home, work, school, online or any other context. It is also very good in terms of helping where you might be bullied for a specific reason for example your sexuality. But for the rest of this article I want to help you think about your relationships and whether bullying might be a concern.

First of all think about your family, friends, colleagues are there any relationships where you can find yourself feeling uncomfortable, this means that you feel uncomfortable either because you can feel unpleasant feelings or you sense the other person is in some way uncomfortable?

Secondly, identify what is it about your interactions that feel uncomfortable? Is it things that are said to you, is it things you find yourself saying to them? Do you feel irritated, frustrated, nervous or scared? Do you find yourself acting differently around them to how you normally behave? Do you observe that they treat you differently to other people? Has anyone who knows you and spent time with you said anything to you about what they see happening?

Are your requests / wishes ignored? Do you feel forced into doing what the other person wants? Does the person approach you even when you have shown no interest in contact with them? Do you think there is an obvious or perceived power imbalance? Do you think the person might find your interactions with them hurtful or upsetting? Do they ever say that you are being unfair? Do they always do what you want at the expense of what they want? Are either of you always right or always wrong?

Third, what have you tried to change or stop what is happening? What haven’t you tried and why? Have you tried telling the person that you find their behaviour towards you hurtful? If so did they ignore what you said and continue or increase the hurtful behaviour? Or are you just too frightened to even try? If this is the case then talk this over with someone as the situation needs to change.

If you are wondering whether you might have been bullying then can you remember how the other person responded in to your actions or words. Did they appear calm and relaxed or nervous and scared, what did you then do? Did you continue with your words and actions? Did you ask them if they were ok? Did they do what you wanted even though they had said it was not what they wanted? If you now think that maybe you might have treated them badly you might consider asking them or find someone who you can talk this through with.

People can feel ashamed if they have been bullied or guilty and afraid if they have been the one bullying, so speaking to someone you don’t know can often be really helpful. It is important to be able to feel able to tell the whole story’ if you find yourself editing out things you or the other person did then this suggests you are not talking this through with the right person.

Often people get caught up in debate about whether one or other of the people in “bullying” situations is right or wrong. This is really unhelpful, bullying is a behaviour which causes harm and action must always be taken to ensure it is stopped.

Nicholas Rose
Psychotherapist, Counsellor, Couples Counsellor and Coach

UKCP registrant, MBACP (accred), UKRCP
PGDip, MA, Adv Dip Ex Psych

Nicholas Rose & Associates
Counselling, psychotherapy and coaching for children, adults, couples and families.

nicholas-rose.co.uk

Read more blogs by Nicholas Rose

Read the next in the series – Mind Matters: To hibernate or not to hibernate? That is the question …

Read the previous one – Mind Matters: The rush to judge

See all Nicholas’s Mind Matters blogs here

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

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Chiswick Reconfined – Lockdown getting us down

A new recruit enjoys her first day out with the RNLI

There is an initiation rite apparently. But it’s not as bad as you might think. Chiswick’s Lifeboat station relies on volunteers, as does the whole of the RNLI, as they receive no government funding. Georgie Cannock, 18, had her first day out on the river as an RNLI volunteer last week, and they haven’t put her off yet.

On the water for the first time

By Georgie Cannock

If you had told me a few years ago that at age 18, I’d be volunteering for the RNLI and racing down the River Thames on a lifeboat on a cold November morning, I think I would have said you were mad.

As a child, I spent my summers in Anglesey, North Wales raising money for our local lifeboat station, selling cakes or painted stones to passers-by on the beach and washing cars. The lifeboat station and RNLI were always important to me growing up, especially as a sailor, lover of water-sports and powerboat user, but I never once thought I’d be on crew myself.

That is, until 2018 when I took a powerboat course which happened to be run by a volunteer at the Trearddur Bay Lifeboat station. He showed us round the station, the Lifeboat and told us tales of rescues and how everything worked. That day, something clicked for me and I knew that volunteering for the RNLI was something I wanted to do. I loved the sea, I loved helping people, I loved boats and I thought “Why not?”, so the very next day I sent an application email off to my local lifeboat station, Chiswick RNLI.

Which brings us here – 7.30am on 22 November 2020. I’m stood on the balcony of Chiswick lifeboat station, watching the sun slowly rise and peek out above the trees lining the Thames. It’s so peaceful – the river is like glass and a gorgeous reflection of oranges and yellows is cast onto the water, perfectly complimenting the distant London skyline. It’s my first shift as a Volunteer Crew Member at Chiswick RNLI.

I was excited, but I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t nervous. Would we get an emergency to respond to? What if it’s something big? Am I really cut out to do this? What if I can’t get my kit on quick enough? And being the clumsy person that I am, what if I trip and fall into the water? Questions raced through my mind like the racing water of the Thames, but there was no time to overthink. We were due afloat on exercise at 8am, so myself Alistair and Mark (the other two volunteers on with me that day) donned our dry suits and lifejackets, were briefed for the day by helm James and headed down to the boat.

Being out on the water for the first time certainly felt surreal. Fully kitted up with helmet on, speeding along the river, wind in your face and all, it was definitely an exhilarating experience. It was here that I learned the basics of ‘watchkeeping’, and the importance of always being alert and communicating our surroundings with the Helm. To begin our morning exercise, we were ‘tasked’ to help rescue Father Christmas, who had broken down whilst delivering a Christmas tree. We set up a tow, took him back to safety and continued on towards Richmond.

Next up, after being shown some important locations along the river, I had my first go at driving the boat. Ensuring that each crew member can control and drive the boat if necessary is important, just in case anything should happen to the Helm. Even though I had driven a boat before, I quickly found out that it’s quite a bit harder than it looks! It’s made to look so easy, and even though I only tried simple turning and going at a very slow speed, trying to keep such a big boat on a straight-line path was quite a challenge.

After driving, I learned some basic skills such as recovering something out of the water (which we practiced with a fender), tying up the boat to a mooring, and how to handle ropes correctly, as they can be the most dangerous aspect of being on board the lifeboat. I also learned how to use the mobile radios using the correct call sign and such, by transferring onto a different vessel and radioing in to the lifeboat to come pick me up.

By now, it was late morning and we headed back to the station. London had woken up and the paths lining the sides of the river were beginning to fill up with people getting some fresh air amidst the national lockdown. Once we had got back to the station and cleaned down the boat, it was time for a cuppa and what I was told is one of the most important tests of all new recruits – can I make a good cup of tea? Luckily, I managed to pass and get everyone’s orders correct, so it was time for some lunch and to relax until boat checks in the afternoon.

Boat checks are vital to ensuring that all kit is in proper working order and occur at the beginning of every 4 day ‘set’ at the station. This was an extremely educational and helpful part of the day for me, as we inspected every item on the boat, checking everything was present, which helped remind me of the location of each item – something that is obviously very important for crew to know!

With boat checks finished, all the tasks for the day were completed. Sunset was also closing in too, meaning the rest of the afternoon was spent indoors waiting for any potential shouts, as well as brushing up on some knots. As the final hour of the day approached with no emergencies yet, the possibility of a late shout loomed.

After discussing this in the crew room, the others took it upon themselves to prank me by playing the sound of the phone (which rings when an emergency call has come in), whilst I was in the Ladies’! Luckily, I was just washing my hands, but the sudden adrenaline rush I got in that moment was immense. I practically flew to grab my kit, only to run in and see James, Alistair and Mark laughing at my panic. It really was quite funny and safe to say, I now feel officially inducted into the crew and know exactly what the phone sounds like!

Overall, it was an incredibly special day for me. I know that I have a lot to learn, however I’m excited to begin my journey with the RNLI at Chiswick and hope that this shift was the first of many.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: RNLI crew rescues ungrateful cat

See also: Glen Monroe, Chiswick RNLI helmsman

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

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Chiswick Cinema launches new memberships

Chiswick Cinema is beginning to look more like a cinema. A building at least, rather than the hole in the ground it was for many months. Chiswick’s first new cinema since 1934, with five screens and a members’ bar, is due to open in the spring. The project’s organisers are about to launch new memberships.

Gold and Classic memberships, on sale from Monday 7 December, will include free tickets, discounts and other privileges. Not to mention the kudos of being an integral part of the cinema from the very beginning.

Images above: Chiswick Cinema interiors, in December 2020

Although there are no further Founder Memberships available, the organisers say Gold Members will have the chance to enter the lottery to upgrade to Founder Membership when the  opportunity arises. Other benefits include a discount for the Private Dining and Screening Room, which will seat 16 people.

Gift Memberships for both Gold and Classic Memberships will be available with a Pre-Christmas postal option available until Friday 11 December and an online gift option available any time.

The five-screen cinema launching in Spring 2021 will be open to everyone, but Memberships convey special privileges.

The programme will include a carefully cultivated selection of modern blockbusters, independent films, event cinema and special events.

Further details will be available on the website from Monday 7 December.

chiswickcinema.co.uk

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: ‘Jules the Foodie’ offers to deliver a nutritionally balanced diet to your door

See also: West and Hunter, luxury barbershop opens

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

‘Jules the Foodie’ offers to deliver nutritionally balanced meals to your door

Images above: Jules Kane and a testimonial from a happy client

Not all takeaways are bad for you …

Jules Kane is a chef trained at Leith’s School of Food and Wine, she used to be operations manager at the Crucial Food cafe at The Hogarth Club and she wants to feed you, properly.

Her specialism is healthy food and when she found herself at a loose end when the health club closed temporarily for lockdown in March 2020, she was inundated with requests from friends and family for nutritionally balanced meals. She has now started a home delivery service and is offering Club Card members who place an order a little foodie gift in addition.

“Loads of people were asking me for meals” she told The Chiswick Calendar. “People are more time-poor or stressed and stretched than ever and cooking healthy food that actually tastes good takes time and can be expensive.  I think for some, the novelty of the DIY cooking kits is also beginning to wear off, although the desire to eat more healthily remains”.

Fridge fill menu

She offers to fill your fridge with ready meals from a menu of six main courses, three soups and three salads, plus options from ‘savoury bites’, ‘sweet bites’ and the ‘pantry section’, which includes her home made granola.

Main course sample menu (options at time of writing) include:

  • DIY Mexican burrito kit with black beans and butternut squash and chilli with flour tortillas, grated cheddar cheese and sour cream (V). Enough for two £16.00
  • Chickpea, aubergine and date tagine with almond cous cous (Ve). Enough for two £16.00
  • Tomato dahl with sweet potato coconut, red lentil served with flatbread. Enough for two £16.00

Soups:

  • Tomato, chickpea and basil. £8.00 Serves two
  • Broccoli, courgette, spinach with almonds. £8.00 Serves two
  • Thai butternut squash, coconut and lentil. £8.00 Serves two

Savoury bites: eight bites for £16.00

  • Feasting sausage rolls with pork, apple and Dijon mustard
  • Indian spiced samosas (V)
  • Spinach, lemon and feta rolls (V)

Sweet bites:

  • Molten dark chocolate brownies. £21 for twelve
  • Anzac biscuits. £6.00 for six
  • Vegan cashew, cacao and date energy bites. £7.00 for six

Nourish and Thrive

Jules also offers to plan your every meal for three days – breakfast, lunch, a snack and dinner – for busy people who work long hours and want a diet which is nutritionally led, but which they don’t have to spend time preparing, or even think about. A day’s menu from the ‘Nourish and Thrive’ section might include a Chia seed breakfast pot with berries and coconut; for lunch: tomato, lentil and beetroot soup with pumpkin seed protein crackers; as a snack: 70% dark chocolate rice bites; for dinner: peanut, red lentil & coconut dahl with brown rice & spinach.

“It’s not meant to be a diet or a detox” she says, “but a way of life, and if you know you’ve got three busy days coming up, that’s three days when you won’t have to think about shopping and preparing food, but you know you will eat healthily and well”.
For this Jules has teamed up with nutritionist Amber Silverman, who has her own business offering personal advice on nutrition, tailoring diets specifically for individual needs.

Jules knows a lot of her clients just from living in Chiswick. She grew up in Bedford Park and went to Chiswick & Bedford Park Prep School. Since then she has travelled the world, living for periods in California and Australia, coming back to W4 in 2010. She has a lot of experience as a chef, having worked with the “godfather of modern British cookery” Alastair Little, as well as enjoying stints at Le Gavroche and Bibendum, and running her own pub in south Devon.

Her husband Mike Brown is also a chef and helps her with orders a couple of days a week. They have a daughter called Lily, aged 12, and a Jack Russell called Milo. You may know her from the Crucial Cafe at the Hogarth Club, or from the Cookbook Festival events and supper clubs of 2018 – 19.

Club Card offer

Jules the Foodie is part of The Chiswick Calendar Club Card scheme and offers Club Card holders two free molten chocolate brownies or a taster bag of home made granola with each order (minimum order £30 for local delivery).

Email her at hello@julesthefoodie.com if you would like to order (saying you’re a Club Card member if you would like to claim your Club Card bonus).

See what her current menu is on her website.

julesthefoodie.com

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Cinema launches new memberships

See also: West and Hunter, luxury barbershop opens

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

The invasion of Chiswick Eyot

Image above: Withy bundling on Chiswick Eyot; photograph by Alanna McCrumb

Every year the Old Chiswick Protection Society puts out a call for volunteers to come and bundle withies to shore up Chiswick Eyot. This year they’re doing it earlier than usual, and they need people to come and help in early December.

Chiswickians are mostly familiar with the terminology of withies and eyots, but for the benefit of those unfamiliar with the particuliarities of Thames-side living, who may be thinking this sounds positively Mediaeval, they’d be right. New readers start here. 

An eyot (or ait) is a small river island, typically in the Thames, formed by sediment in the water which accumulates over time to form characteristically long and narrow islands, which often are vibrant green spaces home to many different kinds of wildlife. The Thames has around 180 of them.

Chiswick Eyot is a nature reserve and ancient withy bed. Swans nest there and willow trees have been grown and cut for centuries. The cut branches, known as withies, were once used to make baskets to take produce from Chiswick’s market gardens into London. Now, they serve a different purpose: defending against invasion.

Invasion, that is, by the Chinese Mitten Crab, a species of crab thought to have been introduced to the Thames estuary in roughly 1935, arriving in this country as a by-product of intercontinental shipping, by clinging  onto the hulls of ships.

The crabs burrow into muddy banks and create complex, interconnected burrows. The consequences for Chiswick Eyot are potentially disastrous, as the crabs’ burrowing loosens the mud around the eyot, and when the tide flows in and out, the earth is washed away, steadily eroding the island over time.

The Old Chiswick Protection Society, who aim to preserve and protect Chiswick’s natural and open spaces, use withy branches to build defences against the erosion of the eyot. 

The Chiswick Calendar interviewed a member of the Old Chiswick Protection Society, Therese Bennett, who has been gathering withies and looking after the eyot for years.

Image above: Withies shoring up Chiswick Eyot; photograph by Alanna McCrumb

Shoring up defences

“The eyot belongs to Hounslow, but they do nothing for it really. We pay for the pollarding of the trees; some chaps come along to cut all the branches and leave them in piles for us to gather. That’s done over three or four days, you don’t really get much time with the tides coming in and out” Therese told me.

The removal of the willows’ upper branches, to promote the growth of a dense head of foliage, is done in winter while the trees are dormant. 

“Normally what we do is just have the local community come to gather, the Old Chiswick Protection society and some other locals too. Normally we would get 30 or 40 people over there but of course this year we couldn’t do that, so I’ve had to arrange lots of smaller sessions” said Therese.

“We gather all of the withies up into bundles and store them in the corral on the eyot which then are used throughout the year. We bang stakes into the riverbed and then weave the willows in-between those stakes to provide a defence and then we throw bundles and old coffee sacks full of stuff behind those fences and then the mud builds up. 

“We’re trying to a do a bit of planting as well to make it all firm up. If you go at low tide, with your wellies, you’ll see the work we have done on the Chiswick Mall side but also you can see the work we have done on the back of the island on the reed beds, because they’re also disintegrating in the same way because of the Chinese Mitten Crab.”

Know your enemy

Images above: the Chinese Mitten Crab has distinctive furry claws

The Natural History Museum is asking members of the public to report sightings of the Chinese Mitten Crab, a species which is listed as one of the world’s worse invasive species. 

Other than damaging river banks, they cause numerous other problems to areas that they occupy such as damaging fishing gear, blocking intake streams from rivers and reservoirs, modifying natural habitats and competing with native species.

The crabs can grow to the size of a dinner plate. They have distinctive claws that make them appear furry and they have a squarish body with four spines.

“There’s big research project being done on the Chinese Mitten Crab by the Natural History Museum and Royal Holloway College, so we’ll know more about all that at some point in the future” said Therese. 

If you’ve seen a Chinese Mitten Crab, or thought you might have, you can report it by clicking here.

Images above: Withy bundling on Chiswick Eyot; photographs by Alanna McCrumb

Volunteer to help with bundling

The Old Chiswick Protection Society are running several withy bundling sessions from 3 – 8 December.

You don’t have to be an experienced gardener to take part and “any random person” can take part according to Therese. 

“Last week we had an eight-year-old and we had an 82-year-old, so anybody is welcome. You don’t need any experience, we show people what to do and it’s very simple”.

I asked if there was any recommendations Therese had for someone who had never withy gathered before, to which she replied:

“Gloves and wellies! You don’t need any tools, if you do need tools then we have some. Really it’s all bending down, picking up branches, using the tripods which we have built to lay the withies across and if they’re too heavy as a bundle then there’s always someone else who will volunteer to carry them.

“We’ve also been very careful about social distancing, it’s a big space so there’s plenty of space for people to work on their own.

“I’m slightly worried at the moment at having too many people will turn up and if that does happen, I will have to turn people away as people won’t be able to work at a distance but so far, I think the most we have had on one day last week is 16.”

The event poster says you take part at your own risk, so watch out for crabs!

If you’d like to take part in withy bundling and would like more information, you can follow the link below to the Old Chiswick Protection Society’s website:

ocps.btck.co.uk/News

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Radical new plans for temporary crossing over Hammersmith Bridge

See also: Spate of thefts from cars

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

West and Hunter, luxury barbershop opens

Snappy Snaps offers personal framing service online

Image above: Snappy Snaps’ framing service

Local retailers have been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic, especially the ‘non-essential’ retailers. There has been much haggling over what qualifies as ‘essential’ and ‘non-essential’ but by any stretch of retailing logic, picture framing doesn’t quite make the grade.

So John Fitzgerald and his staff at Snappy Snaps Chiswick have been using their time wisely during the 2020 periods of lockdown, firstly refitting the shop, dividing it up with screens, but also by looking at ways they can adapt their services more to suit customers’ needs if they don’t want to venture into the shop.

Using a video link you can have a virtual tour of Snappy Snaps’ Chiswick store and see the extensive range of products that exists for presenting wall art, including canvas prints, poster prints and made to measure frames.

John is particularly proud of his new interactive online framing application, which they have created themselves. Many local customers, businesses and artists use their high end made-to-measure framing service. Customers like to take their time choosing a frame that suits their personal style. They want to try out different colours and materials to see how they go together. Should the glass be reflective or non reflective? It’s not a quick or simple business.

Now, from the safety of your home you can talk to John and his team of framing and image specialists, discuss your requirements and together choose the best frame and mount to suit your image or art, virtually. It combines the personal service customers want, using an online chat forum, with the ability to order online with ease.

Once you have selected your perfect frame they will complete your order and let you know when to collect it. Larger items can be delivered right to your door within the W4 postcode.

To make it easier for customers they have moved a selection of frames to the window so that customers can also see their range from outside the store.

Image above: Snappy Snaps framing service

John, the owner for over 30 years, told The Chiswick Calendar:

“I know there will be a lot of pressure on customers  to get their framing and projects ready for Christmas, so we are offering this service so customers can be guaranteed a quiet time to order their frames or other projects and consult with one of our specialists to ensure they get exactly what they want and in time for Christmas”.

Book a consultation with their framing specialists or their print and design guys here: picktime.com/sschiswick

Snappy Snaps Chiswick is OPEN for Click & Collect Same Day Orders from their website. From Wednesday 2 December the shop will be open to the public as normal. They’re now ready for the Christmas onslaught and ready for anything 2021 might bring. During periods when the Government deems it necessary to close, staff can continue working to fulfill your requirements online and if you have any questions you can simply give them a ring to discuss your needs 020 8994 0854

NB Snappy Snaps Chiswick is a member of The Chiswick Calendar’s Club Card scheme, offering 10% off all services.

snappysnaps.co.uk/chiswick

Snappy Snaps Chiswick
182 Chiswick High Road, London W4 1PP
phone. 0208 994 0854

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Artists Directory

See also: Chiswick Calendar Club Card scheme

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Let Christmas commence!

The residents of Silver Crescent and Thorney Hedge Road have decided it’s Christmas.

They have organised as a community to all dress their front gardens and windows and they turned on all the lights at 5.00pm on Saturday 28 November.

Photographs by Jennifer Griffiths

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Christmas has arrived in Park Rd – Photo gallery by Alanna McCrum

See also: London in Tier 2

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Episode 31: South African cricket and the poisoned legacy of apartheid

Cricket authors (and obsessives) Peter Oborne and Richard Heller launched a podcast early in 2020 to help deprived listeners endure a world without cricket. They’re no longer deprived of cricket, but still chat regularly about cricket topics with different guests each week – cricket writers, players, administrators and fans – hoping to keep a good line and length but with occasional wides into other subjects.

As England’s tour of South Africa gets under way, the two latest guests of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller on their cricket-themed podcast offer deep insight into South African cricket past and present. Mo Allie, of the BBC Africa service has reported on South African sport for many years and is the author of More Than A Game, telling many heroic stories of South Africa’s non-white cricketers in times of racial segregation. Cricket historian and analyst Arunabha Sengupta has written Apartheid – A Point To Cover, the story of South African cricket to 1970 and of the successful Stop The 70 Tour campaign.


More Platforms

Mike Atherton delivers an appeal for the MCC Foundation. For a week from 1 December donations will be doubled in value, and will help to give cricketing experience and access to coaching for disadvantaged boys and girls.  See donate.thebiggive.org.uk

Mo explains the turmoil in South Africa’s cricket administration which almost caused the cancellation of England’s tour. He and Arunabha also analyse the bitter conflicts within South Africa over taking the knee in support of BlackLivesMatter. They have their roots in the poisoned legacy of apartheid, which created inequalities and imbalances in South African society which will take generations to eradicate, in the present violence which engulfs the country, and in a failure, not only in South Africa, to shake off cultural attitudes and racial myths formed in colonial times. Mo conveys the shock in South Africa when Makaya Ntini, the “poster boy” for its newly integrated cricket, revealed the loneliness he experienced in the team through enduring racism. He reveals that white players who took the knee earlier this year received death threats.

Arunabha shows how racial segregation was embedded in South African cricket long before it was formalized and developed under apartheid, citing particularly the case of Krom Hendricks, a brilliant pace bowler of mixed race, denied international selection as far back as 1894 at the behest of Cecil Rhodes. He was the first of many non-white cricketers excluded  by a “100 per cent white” quota system. Mo gives moving personal testimony of the losses experienced by his family through waves of discriminatory laws, especially from enforced removals, and of what it was  like for him to grow up under apartheid. Many non-white people, not only in sport, had to go overseas to get a career, and the talents of millions more were lost to the world.

Arunabha traces the impact of exclusion from international cricket and sport generally on the image and self-confidence of a sports-crazed nation, and how Nelson Mandela later saw integrated sport as an agent of change. He cites Mike Procter and Clive Rice on the effect of playing in multi-racial English county cricket in taking South African players out of their “white bubble.”

Mo expresses deep worry about the shortage of selfless capable leaders not only in South African cricket but in other sectors. Racial quotas and stereotypes are too often blamed for failures. The “rainbow nation” may be dissolving as communities retreat into their own laagers and compete for scarce resources in a deeply troubled economy. However, both he and Arunabha see signs of positivity and hope, not least in the public efforts to promote inclusion through cricket by former cricketers such as Lance Klusener, Paul Adams, and especially Gary Kirsten, who is developing the talents of disadvantaged young players at his cricket academy. They also cite the successes of South African women in cricket and other sports and the efforts led by Professor André Odendaal (a future guest) to recapture the lost history of non-white players and make the nation aware of its full sporting legacy.

Get in contact with the podcast by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com, we’d love to hear from you!

Listen to more episodes of Oborne & Heller

Next episode – Episode 32: The thrill returns of Ted Dexter at the crease

Previous Episode – Episode 30: John Cleese shares his lifelong love of cricket

Listen to all episodes – Oborne & Heller on Cricket

 

Peter Oborne & Richard Heller

Peter Oborne has been the chief political commentator for the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, a maker of several documentaries and written and broadcast for many different media. He is the author of a biography of Basil D’Oliveira and of Wounded Tiger, a history of Pakistan cricket, both of which won major awards.

Richard Heller was a long-serving humorous columnist on The Mail on Sunday and more briefly, on The Times. He worked in the movie business in the United States and the UK, including a brief engagement on a motion picture called Cycle Sluts Versus The Zombie Ghouls. He is the author of two cricket-themed novels A Tale of Ten Wickets and The Network. He appeared in two Mastermind finals: in the first his special subject was the life of Sir Gary Sobers.

Oborne & Heller cricketing partnership

Jointly, he and Peter produced White On Green, celebrating the drama of Pakistan cricket, including the true story of the team which lost a first-class match by an innings and 851 runs.

Peter and Richard have played cricket with and against each other for a variety of social sides, including Parliament’s team, the Lords and Commons, and in over twenty countries including India, Pakistan, the United States, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Australia, Zimbabwe, New Zealand and Morocco.

The Podcast is produced by Bridget Osborne and James Willcocks at The Chiswick Calendar.

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See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

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Radical new plans for temporary crossing over Hammersmith Bridge

Image above: Foster & Partners Hammersmith Bridge proposal

Leading architects and engineers Foster + Partners, Sir John Ritblat FRICS of Delancey and LB Hammersmith & Fulham have unveiled a radical new proposal for a temporary crossing over Hammersmith Bridge. The plan, which was unveiled on 26 November, would provide a two-tiered crossing, raised above the existing road deck, which would allow vehicles to cross the River Thames without putting stress on the bridge. The temporary crossing would allow restoration to go ahead unhindered on the original Victorian structure.

The bridge was closed to vehicular traffic in April 2019 because of cracks in the metal and closed completely in August 2020 when the summer heat was found to have expanded the cracks.

Under the proposal, LB Hammersmith & Fulham says pedestrians, cyclists and, potentially, motor vehicles could be using the bridge, with river traffic passing underneath, within a year of a contractor being appointed. A new raised truss structure would be built above the existing road deck featuring a lower level for pedestrians and cyclists and an upper level for cars and buses.

Image above: Foster & Partners Hammersmith Bridge proposal

Meeting with Transport Secretary Grant Shapps ‘positive’

Sir John Ritblat, representing Delancy, approached Foster + Partners to develop an alternative plan for the bridge after Stephen Cowan asked for Sir John’s assistance following the bridge’s closure in August. Sir John is a property developer. He is chairman of the advisory board of Delancey, the property and asset-backed investment firm founded in 1995 by his son Jamie Ritblat. He is also honorary president (and formerly chairman and CEO) of The British Land Company PLC, the FTSE100 London-based property company from which he retired as chairman in 2006.

Foster & Partners is Sir Norman Foster’s global studio for sustainable architecture, engineering, urbanism and industrial design. Their worldwide reputation is based on such buildings as the Bund Finance Centre in Shanghai, the Supreme Court in Singapore, the Reichstag New German Parliament in Berlin and the Great Court at the British Museum. Their transport projects include the Jeddah Metro in Saudi Arabia and the Ocean Terminal extension in Hong Kong.

H&F Leader Cllr Stephen Cowan outlined details of the proposed plan to Transport Secretary Grant Shapps on Wednesday 25 November and urged the government to give it full consideration. The concept plan designed by Foster + Partners and further developed with specialist bridge engineers COWI, was presented to Department of Transport officials on 26 November.

A Hammersmith Bridge Task Force was set up earlier this year to bring together LB Hammersmith & Fulham, LB Richmond, Transport for London the Port of London Authority and the Department of Transport to find a way through the stalemate over who would pay for repairs to the bridge and how the work should be carried out. Chairman Baroness Vere commented on Friday 27 November that the meeting between Cllr Cowan and Transport Secretary Grant Shapps had been ‘positive’ but did not comment further on the proposal.

Image above: Foster & Partners Hammersmith Bridge proposal

Cost lower than existing plan

Hammersmith & Fulham Council says the Initial estimates suggest the temporary crossing would allow the strengthening and stabilisation works to the 133-year-old heritage bridge to be completed at a cost lower than the current £141million estimate.

The raised deck would enable existing approach routes for traffic to be used, causing minimum disruption for residents on both banks of the river. The structure will also provide support for the bridge as well as a safe platform for restoration work to be carried out.

There would be no load added to the existing bridge deck which would be removed in stages for repair. Contractors would use the new lower pedestrian deck to access the works. When completed, the temporary raised deck would be removed.

Elements of the Grade II* listed bridge that need repair, including pedestals, anchors and chains, would be lifted away using the temporary bridge and transported by barges to an off-site facility for safe repair and restoration.

By repairing the bridge off-site, the huge task of restoration can be done at greater speed, to a higher level and at significantly reduced cost. It would also minimise noise, environmental impact and onsite activity, as well as reducing the all-important carbon footprint of the works.

Historic England approval would need to be sought for this scheme which enables the bridge to be restored to its original Victorian splendour with fewer constraints.

Cllr Cowan said: “I am extremely grateful to Sir John Ritblat for responding to our call for help so comprehensively. The Foster + Partners and the COWI design team have developed an exciting and imaginative initiative which has the very strong possibility of providing a quicker and better value solution than any of the other proposals.

“Our engineers have held positive and constructive talks with Foster + Partners and COWI. I am optimistic that we now have a viable option within our grasp that is a win for all. I commend it to the Government in the hope that it will be the catalyst for real progress in funding all the necessary works to the bridge.

“We have been exploring a variety of options since the initial closure to motor traffic in 2019 and now have a proposal which potentially meets our objectives of a fast track, lower cost, lower noise, lower emission solution that would lead to an earlier reopening of the bridge.

“I was pleased to be able to deliver the news of the project to the Secretary of State yesterday and look forward to working with his Taskforce to find a solution that works for everyone impacted by the bridge’s closure.”

Luke Fox, Senior Executive Partner at Foster + Partners, said: “We are excited to propose this simple and sustainable solution to this important missing piece of London’s infrastructure that also gives the opportunity to bring back to life a beautiful and iconic bridge by Sir Joseph Bazalgette.”

Roger Ridsdill Smith, head of Structural Engineering at Foster + Partners, said: “We believe that our concept resolves the two challenges for Hammersmith Bridge economically and efficiently: delivering a temporary crossing quickly, whilst providing a safe support to access and refurbish the existing bridge. We appreciate the engagement and contribution from the technical experts in charge of the bridge and look forward to further studies to develop the scheme.”

David MacKenzie, Executive Director at COWI, said: “We consider that this approach is practical and viable. Our experience is that offsite refurbishment of bridge structures is safer and more controlled, and results in a higher quality final outcome when the structure is re-installed.”

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: More than six years before Hammersmith Bridge could reopen to vehicles

See also: Government setting up task force to restore Hammersmith Bridge

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Spate of thefts from cars

Thefts from vehicles at the highest level this year

There has been a spate of thefts from cars in Cambridge Rd South and Oxford Gardens. These pictures were taken on 24 November in Cambridge Rd South. Two women and two men were caught on camera around 4.00am that morning, smashing car windows and stealing things which had been left inside the vehicles.

Vehicle crime is at the highest it has been in Chiswick since January 2020, with 77 recorded thefts from vehicles or interference with vehicles in Chiswick (within a mile radius of W4 3DA) in September, the most recent month to be shown on the UK Crime Stats website.

Bike thefts are the highest they’ve been for three years. Thefts of bicycles shot up in May and have remained high. There were 28 thefts in September compared with nine in January.

Spike in anti-social behaviour during lockdown

The most noticeable difference in the crime statistics over the year is how anti-social behaviour shot up during the lock down periods. Anti-social behaviour was far higher than it has been at any other point since December 2010, the earliest date shown in the table. In April the figure for reported incidents of anti-social behaviour was 336. In May it was 296, compared with 123 in March and 91 in February. In September there were 187 reported incidents. Before this year, the highest figure was 174, in July 2011, which was also unusually high.

Image above: Pie chart showing the breakdown of crime statistics over the period October 2019 – September 2020, within a mile radius of W4 3DA. Source: UK CrimeStats.com

While burglary has remained consistent and shoplifting very low, unsurprisingly, robbery is also at the highest point it’s been all year, with 27 robberies being reported in September. Violent crime has increased in the last couple of years. 86 incidents were reported in September.

The UK Crime Stats website uses data from the police. The actual level of crime is usually estimated by the British Crime Survey to be about 30% higher than that which is reported to the police.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Is Chiswick in the middle of a drug war?

See also: More than 200 arrests made in violent crime operation

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Christmas Flower Market

Chiswick Flower Market will be taking place on Sunday 6 December. Now it’s been confirmed that we are in Tier 2 and businesses have been given the green light to trade again, the market organisers (of whom The Chiswick Calendar’s editor is one) have confirmed the market will be back, selling fresh cut flowers, plants and plant accessories.

Great for presents and great for cheering up the house for Christmas.

Images above: Christmas wreath by Pot Pourri; Cake by The Botanical Baker

They will also be selling Christmas wreaths and decorations, but not Christmas trees, so as not to compete with Chiswick’s existing tree sellers.

As last time, the market will be in the Old Market Place, from outside Chiswick Police Station, down to Lea & Sandemans, and will extend down Devonshire Rd. It will open from 08.30 – 09.30 for ‘tender perennials’ – people over 70 or who are vulnerable to infection – to shop in peace and quiet, with a friend to do the carrying if needed.

Register for (free) tickets on the Flower Market website – www.chiswickflowermarket.com. Everyone else is welcome from 9.30am – 3.00pm. Please wear a mask at the market.

Image above: Customer at the Chiswick Flower Market in November; photograph by Anna Kunst

The Columbia Rd of West London

One by one, established traders who have sold their plants at Columbia Rd for many years are seeing the attraction of setting up their stalls in Chiswick. Isabella Flowers is joining the very popular London House Plants, Finest Plants, Andrew Barker, Steve Burridge and Rose Lily Flowers’ Joe Brown (the one who shouts like a proper East End barrow boy).

“We said we wanted to make the Chiswick Flower Market into the Columbia Rd market of west London. I think we can say we’ve done it!” said the Flower Market organisers.

Back in the market also will be Chiswick traders Pot Pourri and W4 Flowers, regular stalls who have been popular with Chiswick shoppers at the previous two markets and some new additions especially for Christmas. The Botanical Baker will be selling highly creative cakes that look very like real plants in pots, which have to be seen to be believed.

As before, there will be a plant creche, so you can leave your plants while you do other shopping in the High Rd, or enjoy a cup of coffee or a meal. A team of volunteer cyclists will also be standing by to pedal your produce home for you for free (within Chiswick) if you wish.

Image above: Christmas gift bag

Christmas Flower Market gift bag

Also new from the Chiswick Flower Market team is a Christmas gift bag full of lovely things made by people locally.

It includes a selection of amazing products from our local independents, from the famous and well-established to the intriguing and new. This is an exclusive and original offer (limited numbers).

Contents include chocolates from Michelin-starred La Trompette, coffee from Chiswick’s very own secret roastery, apple juice pressed from Chiswick’s fruit trees, honey from local award-winning hives, antique flower prints, blended teas, dried flowers, bulbs and seeds all sourced from Chiswick and lots more. All this in the Chiswick Flower Market’s very own sustainable jute bag.

£75 including free delivery within the Chiswick area – total retail value of goods over £100. Free delivery within Chiswick. Any profits go back to the market and the High Road, helping the organisers to run the market and promote Chiswick. Buy it as a gift. Or just as a present to yourself for surviving 2020!

www.chiswickflowermarket.com

Image above: Volunteer marshals at Chiswick Flower Market in November; photograph by Anna Kunst

Get involved

The Chiswick Flower Market is run by volunteers who are all local residents.
If you’d like to get involved in the market, as a marshal, or offering your time and skills in another way, please get in touch via info@chiswickflowermarket.com

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.