Life after Waterstones

Image above: Annakarin Klerfalk

Annakarin Klerfalk managed the Waterstones in Chiswick for three years before leaving in 2018 to start a family and set up her own literary agency. Many people in Chiswick will remember her from the children’s story telling sessions she ran in the shop and from the Chiswick Book Festival, where she ran the book stall and authors’ signing sessions.

Now her son Carl is three years old and InterSaga literary agency not far behind, she has a small band of authors whom she represents, two of whom, after successful debuts, have their second book coming out in the autumn.

It’s been very strange, she told The Chiswick Calendar, not at all the launch she envisaged. She’s not met any of the authors or publishers she’s been dealing with face to face, and a lot of the book festivals where she would have been doing the rounds, getting her fledgling agency known, have been cancelled. None the less, conversations have been had and deals struck.

A literary agency matches new authors with publishers, getting their work in front of editors, and takes already published authors and represents them, negotiating better deals for their new books and marketing their work abroad.

Image above: Sarah J Maxwell; Billy Lemonade cover

Sarah Maxwell, author of Young Adult fiction Billy Lemonade, grew up in south London and now lives in Australia. Billy Lemonade, published in January 2021 by Whisper Publishing, is the tale of a friendship between two teenagers whose home life is tough; Jane because her mother is an alcoholic, Billy because his father is abusive. They find each other and their relationship is their salvation.

‘A beautifully crafted story about life, loss, togetherness, and letting go’ says Goodreads.

Sarah’s second book What The Knocker Upper Woke Up, due to be published in the autumn, is described as Young Adult fantasy. Set in the 1860s, it is already being talked about with excitement in publishing circles as a future classic; she is now represented by Annakarin.

Extract from What The Knocker Upper Woke Up:

‘Not long after the Big Stink of 1858, Mary the vagrant, stood Sideways at the site of the burnt mental asylum and smelt a smell even worse than the Big Stink. A smell that was spreading, like a virus and disguised itself as slithers of silver, luring the naïve and the distracted. Drunken men and curious children stumbled Sideways and were lost forever. Those that managed to escape, would have Sideways in their soul, changing who they were supposed to be’.

Image above: The Heavy Bag cover; Sarah Surgey

Sarah Surgey’s book The Heavy Bag, is a book about grief, written for children, and has received 73% five star ratings on Amazon.

The Heavy Bag follows a little girl called Enid who has just lost her Granddad. As Enid goes out for a walk with lots of different emotions whooshing around inside her head, she feels the weight of the heavy bag that she is carrying. Along her journey, Enid comes across different kinds of people who encourage her to talk about how she is feeling. With each meeting she offloads an item from her bag that represents a stage of grief and talks about how she is feeling, inevitably, as Enid takes each item from her bag, it feels lighter making it easier for her to walk’.

Annakarin now handles the foreign rights and is looking to get it translated to sell in Norway, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand and Hungary. She is well placed to sell books abroad, coming originally from Sweden, where she gained a Masters in Publishing Studies at the University of Lund.

Image above: Illustration by Sayani Mukherjee Mitra for The Slow Superhero

She is representing Sarah Surgey for the publication of her next book, The Slow Superhero, published by Ventorros Press, coming out early 2022.

“They’re a new children’s publisher” says Annakarin. “It’s good to be working with a new venture”.

Annakarin also represents three Jersey based women: authors Kate Murrow and Angela McKinlay and illustrator Kaydia Torrell, who are producing an adventure series for ‘dynamic girls’.

She does not just represent Children’s and Young Adult fiction. She also represents Susan Lee Kerr, Chiswick based author of adult fiction, Jane Wyatt Walters, author of commercial women’s fiction and Scarlett de Courcier, who has written a book described as ‘American folk horror’. Ian Patrick Robinson, a retired police officer with an established reputation as a crime writer, has signed up with Annakarin to represent him for his new work of fiction.

She has had so many scripts sent to her that for a while she had to stop receiving them. “It’s not fair, not to give feedback”. But after a three month break she is welcoming submissions again from Sunday 1 August, taking all sorts of scripts but particularly looking for literary fiction and non-fiction (“not politics” she says!)

Annakarin Klerfalk writes a monthly guest blog for The Chiswick Calendar on the best of the new books being published, which you can find here: Books of the Month

intersaga.co.uk

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: New literary agent sets up in Chiswick 

See also: Chiswick Book Festival 2021

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Seal sign added to tow path at Strand on the Green

A seal sign has been added to the towpath at Strand on the Green, at the point where it joins Thames Rd at Strand End. The sign lets passersby know that there may be seals on the foreshore and the public should give them their space. The advice is:

Do keep well away – use your camera or binoculars to see them

Do keep quiet so the seals can’t hear us

Do keep downwind so the seals can’t smell us

Do keep out of sight so the seals can’t see us

Do take dogs under control on leads

Do take litter home

Image above: ‘Freddie’ the seal; photograph Charlie Haynes

The UK has both grey seals and common seals, which have been seen more and more in the tidal Thames in recent years as the river water has got cleaner. Seals need to rest on land to digest their food, socialise and feed their pups, so it’s important not to disturb them. What counts as ‘disturbance’ is any ‘change in the animal’s natural behaviour which has been caused by people’. It ‘interrupts their rest, causes them stress, wastes their energy and can result in injury or death’, the sign says.

If a seal is looking directly at you, it’s noticed you, so you have disturbed it. The advice is to back off to avoid it moving away. ‘If a seal makes a big splash crash dive it shows they are distressed’ and they can injure themselves if we scare them into the water. If a person goes and strokes a seal pup, the human scent can put the mother off feeding the pup. The sign warns:

Never get close to seals

Never fly drones near seals

Never feed wild seals

Never scare seals or put pups into the water

Never copy the bad behaviour of others

Never take a seal selfie

Images above: Rescuers trying to save Freddie; photographs by Runa Bousquet

Signs paid for by money raised after the death of ‘Freddie’

The sign has been paid for by money raised after the death of ‘Freddie’, the seal which was attacked by a dog on a slipway at Hammersmith in March and subsequently died of its injuries. The attack made national news as a passing vet and other volunteers fought to save it.

The woman whose dog attacked the seal was outed in the press and condemned for not keeping her dog under control, especially as Freddie had become a regular sight hauled out on the shore, so local people knew he was likely to be there. After initially trying to keep her name out of the media, she subsequently made a public apology.

Mary Tester, the local representative of the British Divers Marine Life Rescue organisation, who was one of those involved in getting the injured Freddie to South Essex Wildlife hospital, told The Chiswick Calendar she had approached Hammersmith, Richmond and Hounslow councils for permission to put up signs along the river bank and only Hounslow had agreed.

Image above: Seal pup hauls out on a paddleboard; photograph Active 360

Sealwatch

After the attack on Freddie, a group of river users formed calling themselves ‘Sealwatch’, which included Mary, Paul Hyman, owner of Active 360 paddleboarding at Kew Bridge, Alison Debney, a scientist with the Zoological Society of London, lobbyist Felicity Burch, Wanda Bodnar from the Thames Estuary Partnership and film director Patrick Schulenberg, who lives on a houseboat on the Thames.

Paddleboarders often come across seals who seem to want to play, but may just mistake paddleboards for a useful bit of dry land on which to haul out.

READ ALSO: Playful seal pup leans to paddleboard

As they use the river regularly, the members of Sealwatch are well placed to spot seals and know their habits – particularly where they like to haul out. They planned signs for both ends of the tow path at Strand on the Green – at Kew Bridge and at Strand End and would like to have put up signs in Hammersmith and Barnes as well.

The initiative has had cross party support from LB Hounslow. The Chiswick Calendar spoke to Leader of Hounslow Council, Cllr Steve Curran when the idea was first mooted, and he said straight away that the council would support it. Riverside ward Cllr Gabriella Giles has been promoting it.

Image above: Freddie; photograph Mary Tester

Lack of interest from Richmond and Hammersmith & Fulham Councils

Mary Tester of the British Divers Marine Life Rescue told us she twice approached the Leader of LB Richmond, Cllr Gareth Roberts, to put signs up on the Richmond side of the river, but got no response. When she approached Richmond Cllr Rita Palmer, she got this answer:

‘We believe the towpath is not a suitable location for posters educating the public about marine species’.

At LB Hammersmith and Fulham she told us she tried the Cabinet Member for the environenment, Cllr Wesley Harcourt and Cllr Alexandra Sanderson, but neither replied.

Since the presence of seals in the Thames has been tracked, from 2013 onwards, scientists have noted a 50% increase in numbers. There are also occasional porpoises which find their way up river and each year for the past four years a whale has ventured up the Thames as well. In May it ended badly for a baby Minke whale which got stuck at Teddington Lock and had to be euthanised.

READ ALSO: Whale stuck at Teddington Weir put down

Mary told The Chiswick Calendar the British Divers Marine Life Rescue were also working with Tracey Crouch MP to try and amend animal welfare laws to include disturbance to seals and particularly attacks by dogs. They are hoping seals will be specifically included in the programme of new legislation introduced in the Queen’s Speech this autumn.

Image above: Seal sign at Strand on the Green

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Freddie the seal attacked by a dog near Hammersmith Bridge

See also: RIP Freddie – a short but adventurous life

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

 

Chiswick Festival cancelled

Chiswick Festival 2021 has been cancelled after a number of staff have been told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace.

Chiswick Festival criticised the “exorbitant amount” of people, their staff included, who have been told to self-isolate – despite most of England’s lockdown restrictions easing earlier in July.

A statement on their website reads:

‘It’s for these reasons that we’ve made the difficult decision to postpone Chiswick Festival 2021.

‘Rescheduling the event will enable us to provide the experience that our customers, partners, and employees expect and deserve – and most importantly – in a safe environment.

‘We want to thank all our customers and partners for their support, open discussions, and encouragement. As everyone has been reminding us, great things happen when the community comes together.

‘We’re just working with Chiswick House and Gardens on the rescheduled dates, however, we will be pushing this back to Spring 2022, as a “welcome to summer event”’

Chiswick Festival will refund everyone who has bought a ticket. They will not be consulting ticket holders to see whether they would like to rollover their tickets for 2022. When new dates are agreed and it is established which acts can attend these dates, new tickets will be released.

All refunds will be processed this week and early next week, they say, and ticket holders should expect it to take a day or two before the money reaches their bank accounts.

Organisers thanked ticket holders for their support and said they would be back in early summer 2022, with an ‘even bigger and better Chiswick Festival!’.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Flower Market

See also: Top Ten things to do in Chiswick

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Closures on the District & Circle lines 4-13 August

Parts of the Circle and District London Underground lines are due to close for nine days from Wednesday 4 – Friday 13 August, while Transport for London carry out essential track maintenance.

Chiswick stations: Chiswick Park, Turnham Green, Stamford Brook and Gunnersbury will remain open, but passengers travelling further than Earl’s Court after 7 August will have to change lines to continue their journeys.

From 4 – 13 August there will be no service between Edgware Road and Aldgate via Victoria on the Circle line and from Earl’s Court to Aldgate East on the District line. From the weekend of 7 and 8 August onward, the planned closure on the District line will also be extended west from Earl’s Court to Hammersmith, Kensington Olympia, Wimbledon and Edgware Road. Full service is planned to resume on Friday 13 August.

Image above: a Circle and District line train

TfL ‘sorry’ for disruption but work is ‘vital’

Esther Sharples, Director of Asset Performance and Capital Delivery at TfL, said:

“We are sorry for the disruption that this vital work will cause to our Circle and District line customers. It is not a decision we have taken lightly, but this carrying out this vital and safety-critical work in one closure will mean we are able to reduce overall disruption. We will also be carrying out other maintenance and improvement work to make sure we do all we can to minimise future disruption. Customers should check the TfL website before they travel, where they will be able to find alternative options to complete journeys.”

Over the nine-day closure, TfL will undertake engineering works around Embankment station. This includes completely removing the outdated long timber track at the station and replacing it with concrete slab track, which involves pumping over 100 tonnes of concrete from the road level. This is intended to provide better journeys with greater reliability. Further work, including replacing and packing ballast underneath the track, will help facilitate faster train speeds and reduced journey times.

Travel advice for the period will be found on the TfL Go app, or on TfL’s website. A dedicated travel advice page for this closure is available here: tfl.gov.uk/circle-district

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Next phase of cycling and pedestrian upgrades to start in Hammersmith

See also: Diluted sewage ‘geyser’ errupts at Hammersmith Bridge

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Artists at Home: Bran Sivas

Since 1973, artists across Chiswick, Hammersmith and Shepherds Bush have been welcoming the public into their houses, studios and flats, to view paintings, glass-making, ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, photographs, textiles, and jewellery – through the cherished Artists at Home open studios event.

Bran Sivas is a painter and drawing artist based in Chiswick. He produces works of oil and charcoal focusing on studies of still life, portraiture, and the human figure.

Describing his work, Bran said: ‘I work mostly in oil and charcoal focusing on studies of still life, portraiture, and the human figure. My work is representational but with an abstract leaning. My process includes both alla prima and a more layered indirect approach.

‘In parallel with the progression of my personal body of work I also happily undertake commissions – not only portraits but a wide variety of subjects and ideas.’

Images above: Three of Bran’s pieces: ‘Goldfinch’ (left), ‘Tyto alba rising’ (top right), ‘Fallen’ (bottom right)

Further information

From 2020, Artists at Home have also been welcoming visitors all year round – online. On their website you can browse artists’ work, make enquiries and save your favourites. If you wish to purchase something you can do this directly with the artist through via an enquiry form.

Bran Sivas is located in Studio 2 – 7 Seymour Road, W4 5ES.

@bransivas

You can also follow Artists at Home on InstagramFacebook and Twitter.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Artists at Home: Helga Stentzel

See also: Artists at Home: Allegra Mostyn-Owen

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Artists at Home: Leonora Trafford

Since 1973, artists across Chiswick, Hammersmith and Shepherds Bush have been welcoming the public into their houses, studios and flats, to view paintings, glass-making, ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, photographs, textiles, and jewellery – through the cherished Artists at Home open studios event.

Leonora Trafford is a painter based in Acton Vale, she is heavily inspired by the natural world and is exhibiting her art this year.

Speaking about her work, Leonora said:

“I tend to take my inspiration from the natural world and I work predominantly on paper exploring with line, marks and composition. I have been creating collage pieces incorporating hand painted paper, stencils, rubbings and monoprints, I like the rawness and immediacy that these simple techniques allow.

“For this exhibition I will be showing new paintings & collages alongside drawings plus there will be postcards and cards to buy.  And we plan to have a kids corner with works by a young artist”.

Images above: Three of Leonora’s pieces: ‘Geranium 9’ (left), ‘Foxglove’ (top right) and ‘Geranium’ (bottom left)

Further information

From 2020, Artists at Home have also been welcoming visitors all year round – online. On their website you can browse artists’ work, make enquiries and save your favourites. If you wish to purchase something you can do this directly with the artist through via an enquiry form.

Leonora’s art is comprised largely of figurative & semi-abstract paintings and collages. She is located in Studio 35 – 111 Valetta Road, W3 7TB.

Website: leonoratrafford.com

Instagram: instagram.com/leonoratrafford/

You can also follow Artists at Home on InstagramFacebook and Twitter.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Artists at Home: Helga Stentzel

See also: Artists at Home: Allegra Mostyn-Owen

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

August 2021 books

What’s new and good to read this month? Annakarin Klerfalk has a look at what’s on offer and chooses A Slow Fire Burning, The Fair Botanists and Mrs March are all out in August.

A Slow Fire Burning

Paula Hawkins is best known for her international bestseller The Girl on the Train. In her third thriller, A Slow Fire Burning, she shows that tragedies don’t happen in isolation and the title itself reveals that the characters have something that has been burning inside them for years.

The book is set in North London, where a young man’s body is discovered on a boat on Regent’s canal. The murder case seems straightforward at first but as more characters are introduced, connections, secrets and loyalties are revealed between them.

Fiona Sharp said: “No spoilers in my reviews, so all I am going to say is hold on to your head, it’s all about to get caught in a spiral of crimes, victims, criminals over many years. Who can be trusted? Certainly one to keep your head spinning as you read.”

A Slow Fire burning is published by Transworld on 31 August.

The Fair Botanists

Sara Sheridan is a Scottish activist and writer in most genres, although her prefrence is historical fiction. Her latest book, The Fair Botanists, asks the question: Could one rare plant hold the key to a thousand riches?

Elizabeth arrives in Edinburgh, in 1822, and all she wants is to put her past behind her. Newly widowed, she stays with her aunt Clementina and discovers the beautiful Botanical Garden, where the Agave Americana plant is set to flower. Elizabeth is asked to record the rare plant’s bloom and that’s when she meets the young, passionate woman Belle Brodie.

Frances Quinn reviewed it as “Historical fiction at its best, full of atmosphere, with beautifully drawn characters and a thoroughly intriguing story.”

Hodder & Stoughton will release The Fair Botanists on 5 August.

Mrs March

Mrs March is best described as “Shirley Jackson meets My Sister the Serial Killer” and I can confirm that the author, Virginia Feito, has written a darkly funny debut full of suspense.

Mrs March is an Upper East Side housewife  who is proud of her husband, George, a talented novelist. His latest work is set up to be another bestseller and they couldn’t be happier about George’s achievements. But when their housekeeper reads it, she comes up with the idea that the protagonist in the book is Mrs March herself – and to make things worse, she is a sex worker.

Mrs March’s life is ripped to pieces and she flees, but not towards freedom. Her new journey leads to paranoia and she stumbles into a psychosis. More secrets are revealed, each one darker than the last.

Elisabeth Moss said: “I read Mrs March in one sitting and was so capured by it… As a character (Mrs March) is fascinating, complex, and deeply human.”

Mrs March is published by HarperCollins on the 5 August.

Annakarin Klerfalk

Anna is a literary agent based in Chiswick who is keen to hear from authors trying to get their books published. Contact her on anna@intersaga.co.uk. She used to run the Waterstones bookshop in Chiswick. You can read more about her and Intersaga here.

intersaga.co.uk

See more of Anna’s book choices here

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Meet the Makers – Made Kind

Image above: Caroline and Anita from Made Kind

Caroline and Anita from Made Kind

As part of our ‘Meet the Makers’ series, meet Caroline and Anita from Made Kind.

Made In Kind’s natural hand wash and lotion, soap bars and soy candles are available in the Chiswick House Shop, open daily 10.00 am-4.00 pm, 10% discount on Thursdays for holders of a Chiswick Calendar Club Card. Jo Finn has been talking to Caroline and Anita about their products.

Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you make:
We’ve been friends for over ten years and both of us started out as fashion buyers and merchandisers for high street brands. Working in this industry opened our eyes to the impact fast fashion has on the environment. It’s definitely changed the way we think about what we buy, particularly since having children. We create natural, plant-based cleaning and wellbeing products, free from harmful chemicals that damage the environment inside and outside our homes.

How did you get into making your product?
We’ve always talked a lot about the effects of harsh chemicals on our children’s health, which we believe were the cause of regular headaches and outbreaks of eczema. We’ve also felt increasingly uncomfortable with the amount of plastic packaging that we use and supposedly recycle, but a lot of which still ends up in the ocean. All of this fed into our idea for safe but effective natural cleaners in non-plastic bottles – and bottles that look beautiful on a kitchen counter too!

Image aboe: Soy wax candle from Made Kind

Which of your products are available in Chiswick House Shop?

We hand pour our soy candles in Twickenham. You can find two scents in the Chiswick House Shop: Unwind and Awaken, blended to fill your home with therapeutic fragrance.  Also, our best-selling hand wash and hand lotion enriched with essential oils and natural botanicals. We also sell our honey and beeswax natural soap bar – the ultimate waste free product! 

What are you working on at the moment?
We’ve just launched two new natural body washes in different scents, lavender and geranium and orange blossom and grapefruit. To reduce plastic waste these come in refillable aluminium bottles that can be refilled with our one litre pouches.

What do you love about Chiswick House and Gardens?
Chiswick House and Gardens has such a wonderful atmosphere, a magical place to escape the stress of our busy lives. It’s so important to take time out and feel the benefits of nature, and Chiswick House and Gardens is the perfect place to relax and spend quality time with friends and family. 

What’s your top Chiswick tip?
Giffords Circus in July is a must see! 

Caroline and Anita are busy on social media and share everything they’re doing @madekind. Their website has their full range of products and some interesting journal articles regarding how to live a healthier life, toxin and plastic free.

Images above: Madekind Unwind soy wax candle;

Club Card Thursdays at Chiswick House

Chiswick House is a member of The Chiswick Calendar’s Club Card scheme and offer holders of our Club Card a 10% discount on tickets to the House and Kitchen Garden and 10% off anything from the shop on Thursdays. Valid until 31 October, Clubcard holders simply need to show their card in the Shop to receive the discount or use the code CHGT-CHISWCLUB-10 when booking House tickets online. Valid on Thursdays only.

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Yeats sculpture hits fundraising target

A sculpture celebrating the Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet WB Yeats, has reached its target of £136,439 and is now scheduled for completion in June 2022.

Artist Conrad Shawcross was commissioned to create a design for a piece of art work and organisers, led by poet and broadcaster Cahal Dallat, have already received planning permission from Hounslow planning officers. A page on the crowdfunding platform SpaceHive was set up in February to raise funds, attracting support from high-profile celebrities, local residents and arts organisations.

The sculpture of Yeats, who lived in Bedford Park with his family as a young man, is planned to go outside St Michael & All Angels’ Church, on the corner of Bath Rd.

Local support

Names such as Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, poet Scarlett Sabet, actors Kevin McNally and Phyllis Logan, and Washington-based Yeats scholar, Joseph Hassett, joined a wide array of donors that also included Marie Heaney (wife of the late Seamus Heaney, Yeats’s successor as Ireland’s national poet and another Nobel-Prize winner), broadcaster and journalist Jeremy Vine, rock musician and campaigner Bob Geldof, poet and former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, National Theatre actor Ciarán Hinds and many others.

Organisations such as London’s Royal Academy, the Irish Embassy in Grosvenor Place, Hounslow Council’s “Thriving Communities” scheme and The Josephine Hart Poetry Foundation all contributed funds.

A significant contribution was made in the final days of the campaign by Dukes Education, which owns the Chiswick and Bedford Park and Orchard House schools, helping the project to reach its target just before Tuesday’s deadline.

Kit Thompson from Dukes Education said:

‘All of us are pleased that children will see, on their way to school, such a vivid and public reminder not just of another local schoolboy who went on to write much-loved poetry and win a Nobel Prize, but of how Bedford Park’s atmosphere of culture and creativity fostered, and continues to foster, young people’s development.

‘We are excited to see this amazing artwork come alive in the community. We look forward to working with the project on this great celebration of literary and visual arts, now and in the future.’

Image above: Cahal Dallat

Organiser Cahal Dallat, who is himself a poet and a resident of Chiswick, told The Chiswick Calendar:

‘I’m so grateful, our supporters in this process have been amazing. I always knew we could do it, but even still the last few days have been really exciting knowing that we can now finally get things into action.’

The Chiswick Calendar gets a special mention from Cahal, for promoting the fundraising early and often. Although the original crowdfunding deadline of 11 May was extended due to delays at the planning stage, the two-month extension had given the project committee more time to have conversations surrounding the project’s “Phase Three” which begins almost immediately.

Next steps

Dallat told the Chiswick Calendar that he would be meeting with Shawcross and their engineering partners on Thursday to organise the groundwork contracts. The sculpture is scheduled to be unveiled on Monday 13 June 2022 as a celebration of the poet’s 157th birthday.

Dallat has also outlined a complete education/arts/heritage experience wrapped around the artwork as focal point attracting visitors, local and international, adults and children, to ‘Discover WB Yeats in Bedford Park’.

The unveiling will also see the launch of a smartphone/app version of the long-running Land of Heart’s Desire literary walk (with Google directions, images, info, talks and Yeats readings by celebrity actors), educational Yeats-poem workbooks for children, families and school-parties, plus future poetry readings and talks, and a promotional video telling the world the Yeats/Bedford Park story through Conrad Shawcross’s artwork and Bedford Park’s history and legacy.

Images above: Conrad Shawcross; artists impression of the sculpture

Dallat explained to The Chiswick Calendar that the WB Yeats Bedford Park Artwork Project didn’t want a statue of the great writer, but rather an art work that captured his spirit and illustrated how growing up in Bedford Park had inspired him.

Called Enwrought Light, by Conrad Shawcross, it was the line from Yeats’ poem He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven which caught the artist’s imagination, in particular the lines:

Enwrought with golden and silver light
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half-light

For more information on the project see Dallat’s guest feature here, and Torin Douglas’s contribution here.

Image above: 3 Blenheim Road in Bedford Park, the Yeats’ family home from 1888 to 1902; W.B. Yeats portrait by George Charles Beresford

See also: Chiswick Flower Market

See also: Top Ten things to do in Chiswick

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Paula Rego exhibition at Hogarth’s House

Image above: Paula Rego in her studio. Photograph by Nick Willing.

Hogarth’s House, which is managed by the London Borough of Hounslow, is hosting a special exhibition by artist Dame Paula Rego DBE RA, described in The Times this year as “Britain’s Greatest Female Artist”.

The free entry exhibition, of some 38 works, will run until November 26th, 2021, at Hogarth’s House in Chiswick. Opening times 12.00 – 5.00 pm, free entry, no need to book. The House is open Tuesday to Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays

Paula Rego is particularly known for her paintings and prints based on storybooks. The works on show include original printing plates made by the artist and The Wine Series – six never-before-exhibited prints which have been given to Hogarth’s House.

Councillor Samia Chaudhary, Hounslow Council’s Cabinet Member for Leisure Services said:

“This is an honour for the Council and Hogarth’s House. We are so proud to be able to host the work of such an important artist at one of our most important cultural sites. This exhibition will draw visitors from around the world and present local people with the chance to see this fascinating work in their own borough for free. It’s very exciting for Hounslow to have this hand-selected show of the artist’s work at the same time as there is a major Rego retrospective at the Tate Britain.”

The exhibition includes a range of works from throughout Rego’s career and explores her admiration for Hogarth’s work and its influence on her own. Hogarth has always been one of Dame Paula’s favourite artists and he has been big influence on her own work.

She has said:

“Hogarth is a very English painter of what goes on. He paints it all. He tells it in the form of a narrative so there are usually four or five pictures, like a comic, depicting various stages of people’s relationships and how things were. Hogarth shows everything. He’s a wonderful painter of chaos and cruelty. He creates extraordinary images. In spite of the cruelty, there’s also a great deal of tenderness for the people in Hogarth’s pictures. He’s a curious mixture, which I find very startling, and that’s what I like.’

Images above: The Crow (1994); After Hogarth (2000)

A range of work from throughout Paula Rego’s career

The pieces in this exhibition have been generously loaned by The Cristea Roberts Gallery. This is the first special exhibition on display at the House after the completion of the Mulberry Garden project which has seen the garden redesigned and a new learning space, the Weston Studio, added to the site.

Dame Paula Rego was born in Portugal in 1935 and now lives in London. She is recognised as one of the most significant artists of her time, whose extraordinary imaginative power has played a key role in redefining the possibilities of figurative art. She has turned to folk tales and nursery rhymes for her subjects, as well as to stories from her native Portugal and the injustices of sexual politics. Honoured by the Queen with a Damehood in 2010, she is the subject of a major retrospective this year at Tate Britain.

The earliest prints in the exhibition are etchings, taken from the artist’s Nursery Rhymes series of 1989. The three etchings entitled After Hogarth relate to the end of the story of the disastrous marriage told in Rego’s large-scale triptych. There are also five plates from Pendle Witches made in 1996, inspired by the trials and executions of a group of women from the Lancashire village of Pendle who, in 1612, were accused of witchcraft.

The Crow series of 1994 consists of four prints, all of which are shown here and there are also three prints from her painfully direct Untitled series of 1999-2000. These are shown together with a selection from a set of lithographs that she made in 2001-02, to illustrate Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre of 1847.

Image above: Hogarth’s House

The Wine series donated to Hogarth’s House

To mark this exhibition, Dame Paula has given Hogarth’s House a series of six works, The Wine Series. This series was originally commissioned by a wine company to be reproduced on wine labels. However, when they saw the finished works, all made with a true Hogarthian spirit, the company had second thoughts and they were never produced.

The works are on public display here for the first time. Four are in the exhibition itself and two are hung in the permanent galleries in the House next to Hogarth’s Beer Street and Gin Lane.

Hogarth’s House is the former home of painter, engraver and satirist William Hogarth who owned the House from 1749 until his death in 1764. It remained in his family’s hands for the rest of the eighteenth century.

Hogarth is known as the Father of English Painting and his influence has been felt by everyone from JWM Turner to Igor Stravinski, Peter Blake and Grayson Perry. Hogarth’s House has been open to the public since 1904 and displays a comprehensive collection of his works as well as information on his life both in the House and within his social circles.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Specialist workshops to mark Chiswick Flower Market’s one year anniversary

See also: July 2021 Gallery of pictures from the Flower Market

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Devonshire Rd reopened to vehicular traffic

Image above: Devonshire Rd – New signes installed Monday 26 July 2021

Devonshire Rd has been reopened to through traffic between the hours of 8.00am and 5.00pm, and will be closed to traffic overnight from 5.00pm to 8.00am except for access, following consultation with shopkeepers and members of the public. And as Johnny Nash once said, there are more questions than answers…

As the Chiswick Calendar rang round shopkeepers and restaurateurs on the day the planters were being removed and the signs changed, there was uncertaintly and a little confusion. So after a call to LB Hounslow Member of Cabinet for Transport, Cllr Hanif Khan, with reference to Hounslow’s traffic officers, here, hopefully are the answers you seek.

Q: Can I drive down Devonshire Rd now?

Yes you can, between the hours of 08.00am and 5.00pm. After 5.00pm you will only be able to do so for ‘access’.

Q: What does ‘access’ mean? 

If you live in the one way bit of Devonshire Rd, or in Prince of Wales Terrace and your car is registered to that address, you will be able to access your property by car at any time. Taxis and Ubers will also be allowed to pick up / drop off, as will delivery vehicles. ‘Access’ means that they can stop outside the address they are delivering to.

Q: What about access for the businesses?

Access for loading and unloading in the loading bays: the loading bays are exempt from the restrictions, as they will now operate ‘at any time’. The loading bay signs will be changed to reflect this.

Q: What about parking for customers?

There will be some parking available during the day until 5.00pm. Access to disabled parking after 5.00pm remains, but there will be no parking otherwise after 5.00pm.

Q: What about the restaurants which want to use parking bays for outside seating?  

There are five parking bays available for outdoor dining, between nos. 8 to 22 Devonshire Rd. These will be suspended as parking bays and available for outdoor dining both during the day between 08.00 am and 5.00pm and in the evening after 5.00pm. Other restaurants not in this bloc will only be able to use the parking bays outside their restaurant for seating after 5.00 pm.

Q: What about residents of the Glebe Estate and Devonshire Rd south of the one way bit?

They will have to find alternate ways to access their property by car between the hours of 5.00pm to 8.00am

Some 10,000 individuals took part in the consultation, both in writing and in a series of online engagement events organised by the Council, including events aimed specifically at businesses. Following the independent reviews, the Council announced a number of changes to Streetspace in May and promised further engagement with regard to the trials on Bath Road, in Hounslow, and Devonshire Road in Chiswick.

The changes which are now being brought in are intended as a compromise, to accomodate competing interests. Opinion in Chiswick was split when the decision to partially reopen the road was announced. Leading the charge to get the road reopened for vehicles was Cllr Joanna Biddolph.

READ ALSO: Devonshire Rd set to reopen for traffic during the day

On social media @ChiswickHighRd posted sarcastically, in reference to climate change and our reliance on cars:

‘Huge congratulations to @JoannaBiddolph for getting car traffic back into Devonshire Rd. In other news, flooding related to climate change closes 2 London hospitals. Chiswick High Rd shops are still mopping up last week’s floods’.

Paul Campbell commented: “Powerful images of the environmental damage caused by Chiswick Conservatives. Every vote for one of them next year is a vote for global warming”.

Images above: Gone are the planters from the parking bays; going soon are the loading signs – loading will now be ‘at any time’

Reaction from businesses in Devonshire Rd

Chris Couch, who manages Tribe Rugs at the Chiswick High Rd end of Devonshire Rd, told us:

“I think it’s a good compromise in terms of common sense so both types of business (hospitatlity and others) can function well. I think it’s a victory for common sense”.

Tony in W4 Bathrooms told us the road closure hadn’t really been the problem that they anticipated:

“It wasn’t really bad for us before, but this will make it a bit easier”.

Grace, working in Chiswick Pets at the other end of the shops, said:

“We have found it more difficult with the road closure on top of the Coronavirus. It has definitely hindered the business. People have stopped buying in large quantities – especially dog and cat food. They’re buying it online instead”. (They don’t sell online).

“Also fewer people are coming down the road to have a look at the shops and get to know us”.

Hazel Gardner, owner of the gallery Frivoli, said:

“I cannot understand why close it at 5.00pm when most of the shops are still open and residents don’t go to bed then either”.

From those in the hospitality trade, Kate Frobisher at Urban Pantry told us she was in favour of pedestrianisation of the road:

“more from an aesthetic point of view than anything, but I don’t feel strongly enough about it to campaign for it”.

She doesn’t have outside seating in the road

“but if it was an option we’d like it, as we are always turning people away”.

Image above: Casa Dino can only put tables outside in the parking bays after 5.00pm

“This is unfair and it’s ruined my lunchtime business”

Dino Kastrati, who owns Casa Dino, is furious. The tables and chairs and planters and little bit of astroturf he’d put in the parking bay outside his restaurant at no. 38 have been removed.

“It’s so unfair” he told us. “It’s ridiculous and it’s ruined my lunchtime business.

“They told me I could l put tables out after 5.00pm but what I am going to do if someone parts there at 4.30pm?

The Chiswick Calendar asked Hounslow’s Assistant Director of Traffic & Transport, Jefferson Nwokeoma, to explain the policy.

“I’m afraid that we cannot provide outdoor dining spaces for every business that needs one. And in the interests of safety and practicality, we took the view that restricting a cluster of parking spaces is preferable to a sporadic approach. As such, the spaces outside 8-22 Devonshire Road are the only parking spaces that will be retained for outdoor dining”he told us.

Image above: Vinoteca can use the parking bays outside all day and all evening

Detailed answers from LB Hounslow

The following are questions put to the Council by Cllr Joanna Biddoph, with detailed answers from Member of Cabinet for Transport, Hanif Khan.

Access

Q: What is the logic for the timing of no-traffic given that there will be no outside dining during the night?

A: The timing of the restrictions is not just for the benefit of the eateries, we have also taken into account the feedback we received from residents, many of whom want less traffic on Devonshire Road. Businesses close at different times of the day as such the timing of the restriction is based on widely accepted working hours, with an additional hour in the morning, hence 8am-5pm. We will continue to monitor the efficacy and adequacy of the timing throughout the experimental period.

Q: Why is it access only until 5.00pm and not 6.30pm to coincide with businesses closing then loading cars/vans as they leave, including customers of Capital Motors who need to collect their cars in the evenings?

Businesses close at different times, therefore we have based the timing on widely accepted working hours, plus an additional hour in the morning. We will continue to monitor this throughout the experimental period. Customers of Capital Motors will be able to access the businesses.

Q: Where is the consideration for Glebe Estate residents in the 08.00–17.00 timing?

A: Residents of Glebe Estate, like all other members of the public, shall be subject to the access restrictions. They will not be exempt.

Q: Why can’t residents use Devonshire Road to access their homes at all times of the day and night, which would be a significant step forward?

A: This goes against the object of the experimental traffic order, which is to reduce traffic on Devonshire Road.

Q: Why does Devonshire Road need to be closed overnight, from end of outdoor trading to 8.00am?

A: To reduce the volume of traffic passing through Devonshire Road.

Q: Will all access restrictions be removed for the majority of the months of the year when our weather is not conducive to drinking/dining outside so all vehicles can be driven into the Glebe Estate and down the south of Devonshire Road?

A: The experimental traffic order is not seasonal. While the restrictions will be beneficial to some businesses, it will also benefit residents, many of whom want less vehicular traffic on Devonshire Road.

Image above: Planters being removed

Cycling one-way only

Q: Will Devonshire Road remain a one-way street at all times of the day on every day of the week so that cyclists have to continue to use the Ingress Street/Annandale Road route when travelling north back up to Chiswick High Road (ie: cyclists will not – for safety reasons – be allowed to cycle both ways up and down Devonshire Road, something that the cycling zealots have been trying to get permission to do). Does the council recognise that the more ‘pedestrianised’ Devonshire Road becomes, the more dangerous cyclists riding the wrong way up a one-way street are to pedestrians?

A: To the best of my knowledge, there is no one-way exemption for cyclists, nor is there a contra-flow provision in place under the current measures.

Image above: Changing the layout

Enforcement

Q: If the council intends to carry on disregarding the opinions of Glebe Estate residents, how will the post-17.00 restriction be enforced? More spy-cars or a permanent camera? If the latter then Glebe Estate residents must be offered a white list option, as in parts of Grove Park.

A: The Council intends to enforce the restriction using permanent cameras. As Glebe Estate residents have alternative routes to their homes during the hours of restriction, they are not entitled to an exemption from the measures.

Q: What plans are there to move loading bays to where they are needed so that shops can benefit and cafes/restaurants that do not have parking spaces in front of them are not disadvantaged?

A: There are far more businesses on Devonshire Road than there are loading bays, as such it is not possible to provide loading bays in front all businesses that need them. But we have done our utmost to optimise the location of the loading bays.

Image above: Outdoor drinking and dining in Devonshire Rd

Outdoor drinking and dining

Q: Will outdoor drinking/dining apply every evening, at weekends, during summer months, all year even during months when the weather makes it impossible?

A: This is not a matter for the traffic department. Businesses are at liberty to operate as they see fit, within the terms and conditions of their trading licence.

Image above: Parking is permitted between 08.00 am and 5.00 pm

Parking

Q: Will the free 30-minute stop-and-shop parking be reinstated as before, as it has been on Turnham Green Terrace?

A: The payment terms and conditions will be reinstated as before.

Protecting residents from noise and other disturbances

Q: What time should outdoor drinking/dining end to ensure residents are not inappropriately disturbed by noise from outside drinking/dining (one restaurant stops outdoor trading at 10.00pm)?

A: This is not a matter for the traffic department. We would expect businesses to operate within the terms of their trading licence. Any violation of these terms should be duly raised with the Council’s licensing and regulatory department for investigation.

Q: What time should music, whether live or recorded, end to protect residents, particularly in hot weather when windows and doors might be open?

A: This is not a matter for the traffic department. We would expect businesses to operate within the terms of their trading licence. Any violation of these terms should be duly raised with the Council’s licensing and regulatory department for investigation.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Diluted sewage ‘geyser’ errupts at Hammersmith Bridge

See also: Gap opens up along the tow path at Strand on the Green

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Episode 62: Lonsdale Skinner: a cricket career blighted by racism

Cricket authors (and obsessives) Peter Oborne and Richard Heller launched a podcast early in 2020 to help deprived listeners endure a world without cricket. They’re no longer deprived of cricket, but still chat regularly about cricket topics with different guests each week – cricket writers, players, administrators and fans – hoping to keep a good line and length but with occasional wides into other subjects.

Lonsdale Skinner was Surrey’s wicketkeeper-batsman in the early 1970s and also played cricket in the same role for his native Guyana in the West Indies. Since 2013, he has been chairman of the African Caribbean Cricket Association which campaigns for fair treatment and greater representation of African Caribbean people throughout English cricket. As guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller on their cricket-themed podcast he gives powerful first-hand testimony of the impact of the racism he encountered in his English cricket career and expresses his deep scepticism over official efforts to overcome enduring discrimination and prejudice.


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Lonsdale describes his early cricket upbringing in Guyana, often playing with grown men and learning to take the occasional knocks and bruises. His family moved to England and he contrasts the cricketing opportunities offered by his two south London secondary schools: very poor in a secondary modern, far better in a comprehensive, which had a cricket team but no regular schools matches. He soon progressed to playing for London schools representative sides, but racist attitudes kept him out of smart white clubs. He evokes vividly the club cricket he did play, for the African Caribbean wandering Carnegie Club, of which he is now chairman. 2-6 minutes

In his teens he had many sessions at Alf Gover’s Cricket School, a major nursery of talent for Surrey. He says that Gover personally never recommended an African Caribbean player to the county, but one of his coaches did recommend him instead. 6-8 minutes (He claims that Surrey at this time in the early Seventies managed to overlook two West Indian teenagers being trained at the school – Andy Roberts and Viv Richards.) 8-9 minutes

He tells the story of attending a medical at Surrey, aged 17, with another teenager, Bob Willis – and a doctor asking him but not Willis whether he had a sexual disease. 9-11 minutes It reflected the stereotyping of young black men at the time. Although he performed successfully for Surrey he endured racism from some players in the dressing room, and suspicion and ignorance from committee members and decision-makers, who had little or no empathy with African Caribbean people, especially in the role of wicketkeepers. 11-14 minutes

Finally, he says, a display of racism towards him by Surrey’s then coach Fred Titmus (witnessed and protested by Jonathan Agnew) made him leave the county. 18-21 minutes

Lonsdale explores the persistent under-representation of black players in English county cricket. He suggests that even before the postwar arrival of the Windrush generation, counties were ignoring a substantial black English population. 21-25 minutes

He describes his recent involvement in efforts to improve opportunities for African Caribbean players in English cricket. 25-27 minutes He praises Surrey’s recent ACE programme 15-17 minutes but expresses little faith in the ECB’s recent initiatives on diversity. He cites the non-implementation of the recommendations made in its 1999 report “Bowling Out Racism”, claims that as of July 2020 the ECB had no African-Caribbean employees [a claim which the ECB refutes, see below], and emphasizes the scarcity of top-class African-Caribbean coaches (partly addressed by a recent bursary initiative.) 27-35 minutes

Finally, Lonsdale calls for an explanation of the closure in the early 2000s of Haringey Cricket College, a major source of talented African Caribbean cricketers. He suggests that if England’s cricket authorities had wanted more such players they would have funded it and kept it in being. 35-37 minutes

 

We invited the ECB to be interviewed. They declined but gave us a statement instead. We asked them:

  1. The most up-to-date number of African Caribbean employees at the ECB and their current roles:
  2. The ECB’s best estimate of the percentage of African Caribbean coaches in English cricket and what steps it has taken to increase this;
  3. The ECB’s best estimate of the percentage of African Caribbean administrators and managers in English cricket and again, what steps it has taken to increase this;
  4. How the ECB monitors African Caribbean participation in English cricket at all levels;
  5. How the ECB’s response to the under-representation of African Caribbean people in English cricket compares with its response to that of people of South Asian origin. Was the latter speedier and more focused, as other African Caribbean representatives have suggested besides Lonsdale?
  6. What did happen on each of the recommendations in the 1999 ECB report “Clean Bowl Racism” As you will know, the perception that these were ignored and forgotten is a major contributor to the scepticism of Lonsdale and others about the ECB’s current Commission for Equity;
  7. Although this was not an ECB responsibility, any information it can provide on the closure of Haringey Community College, which was such a great nursery of African Caribbean cricketers. (Others besides Lonsdale have suggested to us that its closure was proof that English cricket did not want African Caribbean cricketers to break through.)
  8. The terms of reference of the Commission on Equity, its membership and staffing, and its timetable if there is one;
  9. How it proposes to gather evidence? Will it be able to look at past issues, such as the fate of the Community College, or new allegations of racism, present or past?
  10. What procedures will be followed for assessing and implementing its recommendations? How would they be enforced if counties or other parties ignored them?

 

Response from the ECB

We have nine employees in our London office who identify as Black or Black bi-racial.”

“Based on the data that we do have we believe the number of African Caribbean coaches is running at about 2-3 percent of total coaches. We appreciate that is slightly below the number of African Caribbean registered players.  We are also aware that we have other underrepresented groups specifically – female coaches, South Asian coaches and coaches with a disability.

“In response to this issue, we have implemented the following actions to support these underrepresented groups (Black, South Asian, Female and Disability Coaches).

  1. Foundation coach support
    Free places on all courses this summer available to everybody from any minority group.
  1. Bursary programme.
    Over 3,000 bursaries available to underrepresented groups on Foundation courses delivered via the counties. This funding has been guaranteed for four years.
  1. Scholarship programme.
    100 places for under-represented  groups to support coaches for a minimum of two years to enable them to achieve Advanced coach status and a career in cricket with mentor support and financial support. This funding has been guaranteed for the next four years.
  1. Free places at the National conference and membership of the coaches association.
    25% reserved for African Caribbean coaches.
  1. National support programme.
    To support under-represented groups with coaching feedback and personal action plans plus networking into cricket environments.
  1. Creation of Special Interest groups within Icoachcricket.
    Lead by representative groups like NACC and ACE within the CA to support coaches with a specific interest in African Caribbean coach development.
  1. Specialist and Advanced bursaries.
    Funding to support coaches from under-represented groups on both courses- as a result we have already achieved 25% African Caribbean representation on the Specialist course. The Advanced course is also much higher but I do not have the exact figures to hand this evening. In 2020-21 all these bursaries were provided for African Caribbean coaches only.
  1. Coach developers bursaries
    We have increased the number of free places available on this course and have over 25% from underrepresented groups.
  2. Mentor course bursaries
    We have now run three cohorts of this programme which provides free places for all participants, of which 50% are for under-represented groups and 25% are for African Caribbean coaches.

“There is much more work under way that goes beyond the specific questions you’ve asked (the launch of the anti-discrimination code, our change of governance structure across the game to mandate more diversity in leadership), but this is a significant topic and you were very precise in your questions.

“The “Clean Bowl Racism” report was written in 1999 and so provides us with insights and data of a world over 20 years ago. While many of the aspects of the report were actioned, we fully accept that the game still has challenges with discrimination to this day, and we need to make it more diverse and inclusive. However, we are fully focused on tackling the issues that are in front of us now and ensuring we create a plan which delivers real tangible change, on the ground, over a long period of time.”

The ECB said that it lacked the knowledge to comment on Haringey Cricket College and on other issues it did not wish to anticipate future intended announcements.

We have added for reference this link to the current Inclusion and Diversity section of the ECB website https://www.ecb.co.uk/careers/inclusion-and-diversity and this one to the ECB’s announcement of its Commission for Equity in cricket https://www.ecb.co.uk/news/2050758/cindy-butts-appointed-as-chair-of-the-independent-commission-for-equity-in-cricket

Get in touch with us by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com, we would love to hear from you!

Listen to more episodes of Oborne & Heller

Previous Episode – Episode 61: “Caught Eagle bowled Eagle” and other highlights from a political cricket lover

Listen to all episodes – Oborne & Heller on Cricket

Peter Oborne, Richard Heller

Peter Oborne has been the chief political commentator for the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, a maker of several documentaries and written and broadcast for many different media. He is the author of a biography of Basil D’Oliveira and of Wounded Tiger, a history of Pakistan cricket, both of which won major awards.

Richard Heller was a long-serving humorous columnist on The Mail on Sunday and more briefly, on The Times. He worked in the movie business in the United States and the UK, including a brief engagement on a motion picture called Cycle Sluts Versus The Zombie Ghouls. He is the author of two cricket-themed novels A Tale of Ten Wickets and The Network. He appeared in two Mastermind finals: in the first his special subject was the life of Sir Gary Sobers.

Oborne & Heller cricketing partnership

Jointly, he and Peter produced White On Green, celebrating the drama of Pakistan cricket, including the true story of the team which lost a first-class match by an innings and 851 runs.

Peter and Richard have played cricket with and against each other for a variety of social sides, including Parliament’s team, the Lords and Commons, and in over twenty countries including India, Pakistan, the United States, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Australia, Zimbabwe, New Zealand and Morocco.

The Podcast is produced by Bridget Osborne and James Willcocks at The Chiswick Calendar.

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Diluted sewage “geyser” erupts at Hammersmith Bridge

A “geyser” of ‘waste water’- diluted sewage – erupted on the north bank of Hammersmith Bridge on Sunday (25 July), following heavy rainfall across London.

The jet of water was filmed shooting well over 100ft into the air out of an overflowing storm drain, before falling back onto the surrounding area or dissipating into a fine mist close to pedestrians crossing the bridge.

Filming the incident, Twitter user Thury Bjork said:

“This is crazy! #HammersmithBridge right now. Reminds me of #Geysir in #Iceland. Apparently this also happened two weeks ago when we had this much rain falling in such a short period of time.”

Members of the public speculated about the cause of the spurt of water on social media, with one claiming it was a burst pipe.

A Thames Water spokesperson told The Chiswick Calendar:

‘The vent point is from a storm sewer which also takes away excess surface water from roads and streets. It was working as it should and was at full capacity last weekend due to the torrential rainfall, meaning air pressure built up in the system which needed to be vented.

‘This resulted in waste water being pushed out – wastewater is water from the sewers which is very heavily diluted by the rain.’

Above: Twitter post showing the geyser – Credit: Thury Bjork

Severe flooding occurred across London, yet no sewage overflow notifications

Theo Thomas is the Chief Executive of the London Waterkeeper charity which fights for fishable, drinkable and swimmable water.

On the Hammersmith geyser, Theo said: ‘We’ve seen the intense rainfall of recent weeks put the sewer and drainage systems under great pressure. London has paved over green spaces 22 times the size of Hyde Park in a generation. This combination means the infrastructure is under greater pressure and is less resilient than we need it to be.’

Theo has been campaigning for an automated system which tracks overflowing storm drains and is widely accessible and disseminated online. Prior to the heavy rainfall yesterday, Theo complained that there were no alerts on Thames Water’s manual notification system (@ThamesCSOAlerts).

He added: ‘It feels like Mogden Sewage Works & Hammersmith Pumping Station should be overflowing to the Thames after this rain. No update on the feed though. That could be because it’s a manual system, not automated. Unlike Copenhagen, where they’ve had real-time alerts for almost 20 years.’

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Raw sewage in the Thames is ‘unacceptable’

See also: Gap opens up along the tow path at Strand on the Green

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Specialist workshops to celebrate Chiswick Flower Market’s one year anniversary

Chiswick Flower Market is approaching its first anniversary and to celebrate the occasion there are a number of bespoke, plant-based workshops available over the anniversary weekend, 4-5 September.

Treat yourself or buy one as a present for a mate.

Micro greens and winter growing with Chiswick House gardeners

Learn about vegetable and salad growing with the gardeners from Chiswick House. It may be the beginning of autumn, but there’s plenty that can be grown ahead of the winter months, for harvest now and into next year.

Saturday 4 September at 10.30 am in the Boston Room of George IV.

Book tickets

Lifelike Flowers Wreath & Candle Ring workshop

Immerse yourself in a floral wonderland, surrounded by the finest everlasting blooms and greens in this two-hour indoor wreath making workshop. Taught by international expert florist, Berta Strobl, learn about the art of preserving flowers and how to make your own wreath, using quality preserved and dried flowers.

Saturday 4 September at 2.00 pm in the Boston Room of George IV.

Book tickets

Caley Brothers Mushroom growing workshop

Love mushrooms? Like to grow some yourselves? Come and take part in this fun workshop with kids as a whole family experience at the Chiswick Flower Market. Make up your own mushroom box and take it away with you. Within three weeks you will be harvesting your own mushrooms at home.

Sunday 5 September at 10.00 am in the Boston Room of George IV.

Book tickets

London Terrariums Tinyjohn Workshop

If you’d like to know more about terrariums – what makes these miniature ecosystems survive on their own – join London Terrariums’ popular Tinyjohn workshop. You will make your own Terrarium to take away with you and watch it grow over the next few months and years, as well as learning the history and science of a garden in a jar.

Sunday 5 September at 11.30 am in the Boston Room of George IV.

Book tickets

Image above: Chiswick Flower Market, June 2021; photograph Frank Noon

Chiswick Flower Market is held on the first Sunday of the month on Chiswick High Road’s Old Market Place, outside the George IV. Billed ‘the Columbia Road of the West’, it offers an interesting  range of live plants, cut flowers and horticultural accessories.

READ MORE: Chiswick Flower Market

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: July 2021 Flower Market Gallery of pictures

See also: Flower Market Gallery from June 2021

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Chiswick Flower Market anniversary: Michael Perry’s ‘Barakura’ style container workshop

Take part in Chiswick Flower Market’s first anniversary weekend by learning how to make the best out of your containers using Japanese ‘Barakura’ style planting, with Michael Perry.

Michael Perry – TV’s ‘Mr Plant Geek’ is a hortpreneur, speaker and gardener who appears on ‘This Morning’ and ‘Stephs Packed Lunch’.

Join him at Chiswick Flower Market for a 90 minute container master class. The workshop starts with a half hour demonstration, followed by guidance and advice while you create your own container.

 

The Barakura style turns on its head all you have previously learned about planting a container. More like flower arranging, regard it as creating a container installation, using all your favourite plants.

Barakura mixes annuals, perennials and shrubs in the same container and will evolve over time.

The ticket price does not include the container, the compost or the plants. You will need to bring a container with you or buy one at the flower market (plenty of choice) and buy your plants and your compost at the market. Michael will be there to guide you.

More info and where to buy tickets

The workshop being held on Sunday 5 September between 2.00pm and 4.00pm at The George IV pub, 185 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 2DR.

To buy tickets you can follow the link below:

eventbrite.co.uk/e/michael-perrys-barakura-style-container-workshop

 

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: July 2021 Flower Market Gallery of pictures

See also: Flower Market Gallery from June 2021

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Chiswick Flower Market anniversary: London Terrariums Tinyjohn Workshop

Take part in Chiswick Flower Market’s first anniversary weekend by learning how to make a terrarium with London Terrariums.

Join us at Chiswick Flower Market for our ever popular Tinyjohn workshop. You will make your own Terrarium to take away and watch grow over the next few months and years, learning the history and science of these miniature ecosystems and how they survive so well on their own.

You will be making our Original Tinyjohn, h – 20cm, d – 11cm. We will start with a short introduction explaining the history and science that goes into building a terrarium, from the different plants you can use to why activated charcoal has become essential for us. Then it is up to you guys to get your hands in there and build your own!

We will supply you with a Tinyjohn Jar which you will fill with various Fittonia and Ivy and an arrangement of pebbles and moss.

All contents, jar’s and tools are supplied, we will send you home with a bag to pop your terrarium in and also a care guide with our details if you have any further questions.

We sterilise our tools before and after the workshop. The Boston Room at George IV is well ventilated and has washing facilities. You will be required to bring a mask to the workshop and we will provide hand sanitiser.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to get in touch prior to the workshop. Email us at hello@earlofeast.com.

More info and where to buy tickets

The workshop being held on Sunday 5 September between 11.30am and 1.00pm at The George IV pub, 185 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 2DR.

To buy tickets you can follow the link below:

eventbrite.co.uk/e/london-terrariums-tinyjohn-workshop

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: July 2021 Flower Market Gallery of pictures

See also: Flower Market Gallery from June 2021

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Chiswick Flower Market anniversary: Caley Brothers mushroom growing workshop

Take part in Chiswick Flower Market’s first anniversary weekend by learning how to grow your own mushrooms with Caley Brothers.

Love mushrooms? Like to grow some yourselves? Come and take part in this fun workshop with kids as a whole family experience at the Chiswick Flower Market. Make up your own mushroom box and take it away with you. Within three weeks you will be harvesting your own mushrooms at home.

Everything required for the workshop will be provided.

In the workshop, which last one hour, we will be exploring the amazing world of edible mushrooms; show you how you can grow your own mushrooms at home; chat about the varieties of edible mushrooms you can get locally, play some mushroomy games and answer any questions you may have about cooking with mushrooms.

The £35 cost covers the cost of one box and includes a £5 voucher to spend at our stall. The price is per box rather than per person or group, so a family of four might pay for one box to make together for £35, or you could choose to make two boxes to take home for £70.

About the Caley Brothers

We are three siblings in Surrey growing Fresh Oyster mushrooms and creating Grow your own kits, developing mushroom products.

We are passionate about eating delicious, nutritious food. Home grown produce is a huge part of that. Growing seeds, planting potatoes, and even the odd mushroom kit in a damp cupboard sit fondly in our childhood memories.

Email: enquiries@caleybrothers.co.uk

Or visit our website: caleybrothers.co.uk to find out more.

More info and where to buy tickets

The workshop being held on Sunday 5 September between 10.00am and 11.00am at The George IV pub, 185 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 2DR.

To buy tickets you can follow the link below:

eventbrite.co.uk/e/caley-brothers-mushroom-growing-workshop

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: July 2021 Flower Market Gallery of pictures

See also: Flower Market Gallery from June 2021

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Chiswick Flower Market anniversary: Lifelike flowers wreath & candle ring workshop

Take part in Chiswick Flower Market’s first anniversary weekend by learning how to make a beautiful wreath out of everlasting flowers.

Immerse yourself in a floral wonderland, surrounded by the finest everlasting blooms and greens in this two-hour indoor wreath making workshop. Taught by international expert florist, Berta Strobl, learn to make your own wreath using quality preserved and dried florals.

Not just for Christmas, these multiple use indoor floral wreaths can be used all year as wall hangings, table décor, candle ring holders and more.

This exciting, hands on workshop can be enjoyed by everyone from beginners to more experienced. Learn about the preservation and drying process – a sustainable and innovative new technology in the floral industry and how you can incorporate these eco flowers into your home.

Made to last, these maintenance free, eco-friendly flowers, can be enjoyed for a couple of years without the need to water.

With an exquisite choice of colours and textures, the flowers available will be a range of our most popular preserved hydrangeas, beautifully scented eucalyptus, gypsophila, sea lavender and much more. All materials provided.

About Lifelike Flowers

Lifelike Flowers is an independent floral studio based in Chiswick. We specialise in everlasting flowers; preserved, dried and faux. Beautiful, bespoke arrangements for home, business and luxury lifestyle. Our flowers are ethically sourced, 100% natural and biodegradable. At the heart of the business is a conscious effort to minimise our environmental impact and work on creating sustainable and eco-friendly floral pieces that are made to last.

About your trainer

Specialist florist Berta Strobl has over 15 years’ experience in the industry. Growing from London, to national and international luxury everlasting flower brand, Berta’s floral designs have been featured in Homes and Interiors and Super Yacht Owners Guide.

More info and where to buy tickets

The workshop being held on Saturday 4 September between 2.00 and 4.00pm at The George IV pub, 185 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 2DR.

To buy tickets you can follow the link below:

eventbrite.co.uk/e/lifelike-flowers-wreath-and-candle-ring-craft-workshop

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: July 2021 Flower Market Gallery of pictures

See also: Flower Market Gallery from June 2021

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Mind Matters – Being able to talk about trauma

The word trauma is one that is being increasingly used, understood but also misunderstood. Often there is something really powerful when someone realises that the feelings they are struggling with are those of feeling traumatised. Once identified it is possible to find a way forward.

In this blog post we look at trauma, ASD – Acute Stress Disorder and PTSD – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. In psychology, a PTSD diagnosis is applicable to people presenting symptoms once a month has passed since the traumatic event.

A whole range of emotions can be triggered by an event that for many connects to key life concerns such as security, belonging, identity, relationships and hope for the future to name a few. Misunderstanding exists around what is a traumatic event and to understand what might be understood as a traumatic event what you really need to do is focus on the person who had the experience. It is not the event itself that causes the trauma but it is the impact of the event on the person that is key.

Unfortunately there is such scope for judgement around this and it is often the case that traumas go untreated because the sufferer fears the embarrassment or shame that might come from another person’s adverse reaction. So often when someone struggles with something it results in negative and critical self-talk for example, someone might think to themselves, ‘it didn’t kill you, you should count yourself lucky’. Or faced with someone who appears to be reacting irrationally to an otherwise ‘small’ event it is common for a person to say something like ‘you are over-reacting’.

It is also common for people to manage traumatic events and for them to find themselves triggered by an event much later in life. Sometimes something happens that connects in some way with a previous trauma and that results in a reaction which in relation to the later event does appear irrational or illogical but can make sense when in the context of a previous trauma.

If you are wondering about whether you are experiencing trauma after an event, take some time to think about whether you have started to change how you are living on a day to day basis. Has how you experience or spend your days changed? Are you spending more time following the news / social media, are all your relationships as they were before, are you eating and exercising or have you slipped into some bad habits?

If the answer to any of these is yes then the key is regaining balance. If you are doing things that add to your stress and anxiety levels then either think about reducing the negative activities or add in other positive things to counteract the effects. This is important because if you do not take corrective action then you could end up with a stress or anxiety disorder.

There is a growing confusion around trauma and how it impacts people. Trauma triggers are identified as exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury or sexual violation and the person will have directly experienced the event, witnessed it, learnt of it concerning a close family member or friend or, have been exposed to the details of the event.

Faced with a traumatic incident it is normal for a person’s survival instincts to activate, so “fight, flight or fright” are the primary physiological responses combined with difficult thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations. However, it is the symptoms that present following the event which are used to consider whether someone may need treatment.

In the weeks immediately following a traumatic event, it would be usual to diagnose an Acute Stress Disorder or ASD. Sufferers with ASD will have the same symptoms as those with PTSD but not everyone who suffers trauma and ASD will go on to have PTSD.

The symptoms are grouped into four clusters and include reliving the event (in dreams or through flashbacks), having distressing memories, thoughts or feelings as reminders of the event, then a range of cognitive experiences including memory loss, distorted thinking, wanting isolation and finally “arousal”. So being hyper-vigilant, experiencing sleep problems and/or reckless or self-destructive behaviour, one example might be the use of alcohol.

If you have struggled with your feelings and there is the possibility of them being connected to an event, do not rush to discount trauma on the basis that it was an insignificant event. In reality it may well be that you do not yet realise it’s significance! If you are struggling and think you might be suffering with recent or historical trauma then treatment is possible.

Nicholas Rose
Psychotherapist, Counsellor, Couples Counsellor and Coach

UKCP registrant, MBACP (accred), UKRCP
PGDip, MA, Adv Dip Ex Psych

Nicholas Rose & Associates
Counselling, psychotherapy and coaching for children, adults, couples and families.

nicholas-rose.co.uk

Read more blogs by Nicholas Rose

Read the enxt in the series – Mind Matters – Knowing when to give up

Read the previous one – Mind Matters – Talking about vaccine hesitancy?

See all Nicholas’s Mind Matters blogs here

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Next phase of cycling and pedestrian upgrades to start in Hammersmith

Image above: Cycleway along King St, Hammersmith

LB Hammersmith & Fulham are to upgrade the cycle route along King Street.

The red and white plastic barriers that currently divide the cycle land from the rest of the traffic in the stretch between the Lyric theatre and Goldhawk Rd, are to be replaced with new wands and rubber kerbs. The upgrade will also see new islands for bus stops and more green spaces created.

The works are expected to be completed by the end of the year. It will cost more than £1million and will be fully paid for by Transport for London, say Hammersmith & Fulham:

‘The improved cycle lane will run on the northern side of King Street running from Lyric Square to Macbeth Street. It will then change to the southern side of King Street passing the new Civic Campus development until Goldhawk Road. Cyclists can travel in both directions in this lane.

‘In the meantime, the red and white barriers will also be removed from Hammersmith Gyratory.

‘The route will also feature upgraded pedestrian crossings designed to allow for much better access for Disabled residents. We have worked closely with our local Disabled Residents Team (DRT) and Disabled Residents Working Group (DRWG) to design these changes, and recently visited similar schemes in Hounslow to discuss what would work best in Hammersmith’.

Image above: Cycleway along King St, Hammersmith

The works have the status of a semi-permanent scheme, introduced under a trial traffic order to help maintain and upgrade the safe cycle route that was created last year.

‘Meanwhile the full, permanent scheme is still being developed. It will only be introduced once Hammersmith & Fulham Council has heard from residents, analysed traffic and usage data and fixed any issues or problems with this latest interim scheme’ the Council says.

Image above: Councillor Wesley Harcourt

‘Our goal is to make getting around in H&F better and safer for everyone – no matter how you travel. We’re committed to a final scheme to replace this trial. We will look at the data and listen to residents to develop the best Safer Cycle Pathway that we can’ said Cllr Wesley Harcourt, H&F Cabinet Member for the Environment.

Jane Wilmot OBE, co-chair of the Disabled Residents Working Group for the Safer Cycle Pathway, said:

‘We’re delighted to be working together with H&F in trying to provide a positive experience for blind, visually impaired and Disabled residents who face barriers in using the Safer Cycle Pathway.’

Future plans – A4

Once this interim scheme is completed, feedback from residents will feed into the final design of the Safer Cycle Pathway.

The council have also negotiated with TfL to fund a complementary scheme of improvements for a cycle highway along the A4 to make it ‘ideal for faster and experienced commuting riders’.

The improved cycle highway alongside the A4 will be a much better fit for those riders who simply want to get from A to B as quickly and safely as possible, they say.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: LB Hounslow sign off on changes to Cycleway 9

See also: Ruth Mayorcas named one of Cycling UK’s top 100 women in Cycling

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Man transporting machine guns through Chiswick handed 9 year prison sentence

A man who was carrying two Skorpion machine guns in his backpack close to Chiswick Park Underground station has been sentenced to nine years and nine months imprisonment.

David Longhor, 20, of Villiers Road Southall, was sentenced on Wednesday 21 July for two counts of possession of a firearm with intent; two counts of possession of a prohibited weapon and possession of ammunition without a certificate.

The Metropolitan Police seized the weapons and ammunition and arrested Longhor in March this year. He was under surveillance as he left his home, took a train to Ealing Station and then boarded a District Line train to Chiswick Park tube station.

He was stopped by armed officers who found two Skorpion machine guns inside Longhor’s backpack and two magazines of ammunition – both containing 20 bullets.

He was taken to a west London police station for questioning and was charged the following day. Longhor claimed the firearms were not his when officers found them, but pleaded guilty in court.

Images above: one of two seized Skorpion machine guns; and two seized magazines of ammunition

Tackling gun crime is a ‘top priority’, says Met

Detective Inspector Jim Casey, from the Met’s Specialist Crime Command, said:

“To find one weapon like this is rare. To find two at the same time is almost unheard of! Luckily, weapons of this type do not rear their ugly heads often, and most of the time it’s thanks to the proactive work Met officers are undertaking to keep lethal weapons out of the hands of criminals.

“Tackling violence, including gun crime, remains our top priority and we will continue to pursue criminals involved in shootings and transporting guns and ammunition around the Capital. The public can help us in our efforts by reporting any knowledge or information they have about criminals involved in high harm offending by calling the police or Crimestoppers.”

crimestoppers-uk.org

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: LB Hounslow sign off on changes to Cycleway 9

See also: Police release video of armed arrest in Chiswick

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

LB Hounslow sign off on changes to Cycleway 9

LB Hounslow has signed off changes to Cycleway 9 proposed by Transport for London. Amongst other improvements, they now plan to add bus shelters at stops along the High Rd and to introduce more places for taxis and other vehicles to pick up and drop off passengers.

At a Cabinet meeting on 20 July, Cabinet Members approved the discontinuation of the current Experimental Traffic Order (“ETO”) and trial relating to the Temporary Cycleway 9 located on Chiswick High Road, between Goldhawk Road and Heathfield Terrace and approved making a new ETO (C9 2021) ‘to trial a range of measures resulting from data and responses to C9’.

Image above: Cycleway 9 on Chiswick High Rd; photograph James Willcocks

Is this the end for OneChiswick’s Judicial Review?

Where this leaves the legal action by OneChiswick Ltd is unclear. They have initiated a Judicial Review of the Council’s decision to install the the cycle lane, which is due to be heard in the autumn.

TfL consulted on proposals for a permanent version of Cycleway 9 in 2017. It was signed off by Hounslow Council in September 2019. Before that could be constructed the pandemic hit, the Government gave local councils emergency powers to install Streetspace schemes and TfL installed a temporary version of the cycle lane, which differs in several respects from the planned version.

OneChiswick’s legal action is based on the initial Experimental Traffic Order. Now that has been discontinued, it may be that OneChiswick are not able to pursue the Judicial Review. We have asked them for a comment.

Read the detail of the new changes to the cycle lane in our story dated 10 July.

READ ALSO: TfL propose changes to Cycleway 9

Conservative councillors continue to oppose C9

Hounslow’s group of Conservative opposition councillors, all but one representing Chiswick, presented a report to the Cabinet outlining their objections to Cycleway 9 and calling on Cabinet members to reconsider it.

‘The impact of the cycleway on the lives of residents, businesses and the many other users of Chiswick High Road has been huge’ they say.

‘It is the opinion of the Conservative Group of Councillors that the recent review of the scheme by the Overview and Scrutiny Committee (OSC) was inadequate….

‘Cabinet members must ask themselves whether the information being presented to them is complete and sufficiently free of bias’.

Chiswick’s councillor noted that the Cabinet was being asked to consider either continuing C9 in its existing form or amending or modifying it, but they were not being asked to consider scrapping it altogether.

Image above: Cycleway 9 on Chiswick High Rd; photograph James Willcox

Are more people cycling?

They note that the ‘modal shift’ anticipated by planners – the idea that the public will leave their cars behind and either walk or cycle more – has yet to materialise.

Cabinet Member Cllr Guy Lambert, who says he cycles the route most days, told The Chiswick Calendar that, anecdotally, he had certainly noticed more people using the cycle lane.

“Research shows that this stuff takes time. It takes a while for people to change their habits, but there is another new bike shop opening on the High Rd”.

Cllr Sam Hearn, the Conservative Group’s spokesman on transport, said in his submission:

‘The report notes that there has been a reduction in commuter journeys during lock-down and that the use of public transport has fallen. When confidence in the safety of public transport’s revives we can be certain that a proportion of commuter cyclists will return to travelling by tube, train and bus.

‘None of the changes contained in the new experimental traffic order will facilitate modal shift in anyway. Please look at the detail.

‘Without modal shift the argument for a segregated cycleway is fatally weakened. It becomes just a prestige trophy project whose limited benefits must be measured against the substantial damage it does directly and indirectly to businesses and the lives of road users who, for one reason or another, are unable to make their journeys by bike’.

Air pollution

In its report, Transport for London claimed air quality had improved in Chiswick High Rd since the introduction of Cycleway 9 in December 2020.

‘Data from an air quality monitoring station in Chiswick High Road opposite Windmill Road also shows an overall improvement in air quality, with levels of nitrogen dioxide, nitricoxide and particulate matter that are consistently lower than before the cycle lane was installed’.

But opponents of the cycle lane point out that air quality is not being measured on other key roads nearby.

READ ALSO: TfL and LB Hounslow claim C9 is a success

The Conservative Group of councillors say:

‘One of the most worrying things about the papers submitted to cabinet members is the insistence that cycleway 9 will improve air quality. There is only one air monitoring station on the whole route of the cycleway 9 and that is located away from the vehicle lanes.

‘A clue as to why TfL are not particularly interested in measuring air quality is contained in the report produced for TfL by its specialist air pollution consultants at the time of the consultation on original cycleway scheme.

‘The consultants were quite clear that the cycleway will have little or no impact on air quality. They instead predicted that air pollution will simply be moved around the area as drivers find alternative local routes’.

Image above: Cycleway 9 on Chiswick High Rd; photograph James Willcox

Cycle Safety

Cllr Hearn says the issue of cycle safety was raised at the Oversight and Scrutiny committee.

‘Members of the OSC asked that more work be done to clarify the statistics before they were reported to cabinet. It is regrettable that this appears not to have been done’.

Cycle lane ‘here to stay’

Cllr Lily Bath, who chaired Tuesday’s Cabinet meeting, told the Evening Standard:

“Obviously it has been a very emotive subject. This is just the beginning and it’s not the end. This is a live scheme. This will allow further impact and further feedback”.

In discussion on Twitter, @ChiswickHighRd Tweeted:

‘It’s time for everyone to accept tha the cycle lane, C9, 10 years in the discussion / consultation is here to stay.

Time to improve it, but time to stop wasting time and money arguing about whether it should exist or not’

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: TfL propose changes to Cycleway 9

See also: TfL & LB Hounslow claim C9 is a success

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Man in the Middle 71: De Pfeffel’s Day of Freedom Just Went Wrong

Man in the Middle is the fictional diary of a Boomer coping with the demands of an ageing mother with dementia, his millennial children and his own impending obsolence. Bowed down by Brexit, Covid and self-pity, all he wants is more ‘me time’.  Will he succeed? Or is he destined to be stuck forever in No Man’s Land in the war between the generations?

If you’d like to begin at the beginning and missed the first instalment, you can read
No. 1: The Letter here

No 71: De Pfeffel’s Day of Freedom Just Went Wrong

July 19. Freedom Day. Mid-morning. I’m staring at our bedroom ceiling tracing the cracks in the plaster growing out from the overhead light like the emaciated arms of an octopus. I’ve been doing this for more than an hour, weighing up what to do with Freedom Day, Boris de Pfeffel Johnson’s wonderful gift to the Nation.

I know I should be grateful Bojo has given me back the chance to exercise Personal Responsibility, but I’m not feeling very boosterish yet. Perhaps it’s the thought that it’s going to cost hundreds of pounds to fix the maze of cracks on the ceiling that’s dampening my spirits or maybe it’s because I’ve got a love hate relationship with personal responsibility.

Personal responsibility is great when there’s easy option to take but tricky when there isn’t. Which is why I outsourced the management of my Personal Responsibilities to my wife years ago. She makes the decisions while I enjoy the benefits. It’s similar to the Blind Trusts used by public figures to make money while they pretend they don’t know they are making money.

Other than personal responsibility, what exactly it is de Pfeiffel says I can do today that I couldn’t do yesterday? I make a mental list. Number one: I can go to a nightclub. But what’s the benefit in that?

I haven’t been to a disco since I met my wife on a small wooden dance floor in a basement nightclub in Chelsea at the end of the Age of The Bachelor (circa 1690 AD) where I bamboozled her with my (then) flexible hips and a full head of hair. Unfortunately, I also perjured myself by swearing I ‘loved to dance’ and owned the complete works of Abba. Going to a nightclub now would only stir up memories for her which might trigger a psychotic episode or a call to the divorce lawyers. Besides, I’ve got a groin strain from playing bowls too vigorously last week and wouldn’t be able to do myself justify under the strobes.

So, what else does Freedom Day actually do for me?

‘You can order your drinks at the bar,’ a friend while sipping a hipster lager called something like `Thyroid Balm’.

Is that freedom?

Compulsory table service could be the greatest legacy of Lock Down and should remain on the statute books along with face masks in public spaces. My rationale?

First, ordering at the bar is lost drinking time. Table orders mean punters can focus on what they’re good at: drinking. Two, men make more trips to the bar than women. Compulsory table service evens up the booze ordering burden between the sexes. Three, ordering at the bar causes high blood pressure, especially among male Boomers.

Why?Because young bar staff (which now is all bar staff) prefer to serve young people before Boomers, even if the Boomer has been standing at the bar since before breakfast and the young person has only just come into the pub. This is especially true if the young person is attractive e.g., has several ear piercings and false eyelashes. Keeping compulsory table service would reduce Ageism and the risk of strokes. Why can’t the Government see this?

I should be getting up, but my pyjamas whisper to me: ignore the siren calls of your shirts and shoes to get suited and booted. My duvet says: don’t rush away, it’s warm here. The pillow says: the pub won’t be open for another hour.

I snuggle a little flatter onto the mattress.

My wife is coming up the stairs, her flips flops clapping like a teacher calling a class to attention. I must get out of bed before she sees me. I should be doing something which requires me to be vertical, not horizontal, but I’m not sure what. Maybe it’s just a guilty conscience?

Luckily, like all experienced husbands and good-for-nothings, I know how to look busy faster than Superman can change his suit. I swing my legs out of bed and, in a flash, I’m pretending to do yoga, standing upright by the bed with my arms and fingers stretching up to the ceiling in an approximation of the tree position.

‘What are you doing?’

‘Yoga,’ I say.

I breathe out, bring my palms together at my chest and whisper ‘namaste’ to her, bowing slightly.

‘Are you packed yet?’

Packed?

Oh, so that’s what what Freedom Day is for. I remember now. We’re off to Worcestershire for a holiday. Specifically, to stuff our faces in the eateries of Ludlow: ‘The Kettle & Limescale’; the infamous ‘Cream Crackered’, a novelty savoury biscuit shop, and the ‘French Lieutenant’s Pantry’, which is rumoured to be in the running for a Michelin star in 2035. My personal responsibility was to be packed for a noonish departure.

‘I’ve sorted my holiday reading.’

I point to a pile of paperbacks on the bedside table. It’s a lame distraction strategy and she sees through it.

‘They’ve been there for months. You haven’t done anything, have you?’

She looks me in the eye.

‘I don’t want a rerun of Menorca,’ she says, firmly.

‘Nobody wants another Menorca,’ I say, thinking of that blighted holiday and my pivotal role in it.

‘I could do with some help packing the car.’

‘Down in 15.’

‘Not in pyjamas.’

‘Battle fatigues, of course,’ I reply.

My son and daughter aren’t coming to Worcestershire. Despite that, the kitchen table is covered with cardboard boxes full of provisions. We’re taking enough to make a regiment of Doomsday Preppers happy to face the Apocalypse. I’m worried this will mean too much cooking at the holiday home and not enough out and about in Ludlow and the local pubs. My wife is even taking a bottle of Worcester sauce.

‘Coals to Newcastle,’ I say holding up the bottle of Worcester sauce.

‘Eh?’ she says.

‘Surely, they have Worcester sauce in Worcestershire?’ I ask.

‘Don’t get smart, get packing,’ says my wife.

After half an hour, the car is full. I’ve started to take responsibility. Not for much. But it’s a start. If I do the bulk of the driving, I may even recover the brownie points I lost lazing around this morning. Is that a little Boris Bounce I can feel surging through me or just the thought of lunch?

I walk into the sitting room. My son is standing in the window.

‘You’re up early,’ I say.

‘Don’t come near me,’ he says, sharply.

Now and again, he pretends he doesn’t like me. Sometimes, he really doesn’t like me. It’s a father and son thing. We both grit our teeth and hope it’ll pass.

‘Everything OK?’ I ask.

‘I’m positive,’ he says.

‘It’s so important at your age,’ I say. ‘With Brexit, Covid and climate change there’s so much for young people to feel down about.’

‘No, you idiot. I’ve tested positive for covid.’

My wife is in the doorway of the kitchen.

‘We can’t go,’ she says. ‘I’ve checked the web site.’

‘But we’re double jabbed?’

‘Even so, we have to isolate for ten days.’

‘Even though it’s Freedom Day?’ I ask.

‘It’s our responsibility to others,’ says my wife. ‘Let’s get on with it.’

‘On with what?’

‘Unpacking the car and claiming on the holiday insurance I asked you to buy.’

Holiday insurance?

Oh, cruel Lord of Catastrophic Holidays, why pick on me? It was my responsibility to buy holiday insurance. I didn’t. It’s Menorca, all over again.

Read more blogs by James Thellusson

Read the previous one – Man in the Middle 70: Father’s Day

See all James’s Man in the Middle blogs here

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

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Meet the Makers – Chiswick Chillies

Image above: Chiswick Chillies range 

Caitlin McCall from Chiswick Chillies

As part of our ‘Meet the Chiswick Makers’ series we meet Caitlin McCall from Chiswick Chillies. Her signature Hot Sauce and the Hot Chilli Relish are available in the Chiswick House Shop, open daily 10am-4pm, (10% discount for Chiswick Calendar Club Card members on Thursdays).

Jo Finn has been talking to Caitlin about her sauces.

Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you make:
We’re a local start-up business: we grow chillies in our small urban garden and greenhouse, and we make chilli sauces to family recipes, using only natural ingredients. 

How did you get into making your product?
One summer, when our garden was temporarily out of bounds, we planted a few chilli seeds in pots on a west-facing windowsill. To our surprise, they grew and produced a ridiculous number of chillies. The following year, we thought we’d try it again, experimenting with new varieties. And so it began.

Ten years later, we had a greenhouse, and more chillies than we knew what to do with. So we invented our own super-hot sauce – it helps that my husband is a foodie! Our daughters wanted a chilli ketchup, and soon we also had our own BBQ Sauce and sweet chilli jams, playing with recipes and finding chilli combinations chosen for their flavour and heat.

A couple of years ago, I started selling our sauces in local delis and shops, and the business grew. But the kitchen table is still the centre of Chiswick Chillies: I rely on my husband’s recipes and his culinary flair; one of my daughters designs and draws our labels; and all my girls pitch in to help with everything from bottling sauce to teaching me how to put stickers on an Instagram story. 

Images above: the colourful variety of Chiswick Chillies

Which of your products are available in Chiswick House Shop?
Currently, our signature Hot Sauce and the Hot Chilli Relish are on the shelves of the Chiswick House Shop.

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m experimenting with chilli-based cordials: at the moment, rhubarb and chilli is my favourite, so watch this space!

What do you love about Chiswick House and Gardens?
Our girls have grown up with the pleasure of having Chiswick House and Gardens on our doorstep, it has been a constant feature of our family life: from sunny afternoon picnics to frosty Boxing Day outings, the summer festivals and winter light shows, walking the dog, admiring the camellias. We visit in all seasons but particularly look out for the cygnets in Spring, and I love the camellias in the Conservatory. We remember the old Café with affection and enjoy the new one now. We never forget how lucky we are to have such a fabulous resource so close to home.

What’s your top Chiswick tip?
Chiswick empties in August, it’s wonderfully peaceful – and you can always get a table at a restaurant last minute! 

Find out more about Chiswick Chillies at chiswickchillies.co.uk or by following them on Instagram @chiswickchillies.

Images above: the wide range of products offered by Chiswick Chillies; part of the preparation process

Club Card Thursdays at Chiswick House

Chiswick House is a member of The Chiswick Calendar’s Club Card scheme and offer holders of our Club Card a 10% discount on tickets to the House and Kitchen Garden and 10% off anything from the shop on Thursdays. Valid until 31 October, Clubcard holders simply need to show their card in the Shop to receive the discount or use the code CHGT-CHISWCLUB-10 when booking House tickets online. Valid on Thursdays only.

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Record breaking month for house sales

Image above: Five bedroom Victorian terraced house currently on the market with John D Wood & Co

Guest blog by Julian Masson

The property market for sales in the second quarter of the year was extremely busy as buyers and sellers across the country took advantage of the extension to the Stamp Duty holiday. Across our John D Wood & Co offices we recorded a record-breaking June, selling more properties than any June over the past decade. In fact, the number of properties sold across the business in June 2021 was greater than the total for June 2018, 2019 and 2020 combined.

This trend was reflected in our Chiswick office where we saw offers agreed, exchanges and completions increase dramatically leading up to the Stamp Duty deadline. Since the pandemic, the market in Chiswick has continued to perform well. We have experienced a continued increase in buyers relocating from central London locations with many people moving for space, both internally and externally, seeking to accommodate a more flexible working approach. This in addition to the consistent rotation of people upsizing and downsizing in Chiswick.

Purchasers have had to be quick off the mark, often competing with a number of other buyers in similar or better positions. This has resulted in some properties selling over the asking price or even selling prior to launching on the open market. Most recently, we sold a remarkable six-bedroom family house ‘off-market’ (whereby the property has not yet launched online) which achieved competitive bidding and sold for just under £4,000,000. Likewise, we have recently agreed a smaller terraced house off-market, on the borders of Bedford Park which is under offer to a chain-free cash purchaser. This has become a common trend in Chiswick, so it is crucial for buyers to register their search criteria, even if that agent may not have a property of interest online as they may miss out.

Over the past few weeks, we have noticed a slight slowdown in activity levels, presumably as people wait for the dust to settle following the Stamp Duty holiday deadline, thus taking a more considered and careful approach when viewing properties. This slight lull was expected after the manic rush, and we believe the high levels of interest will swiftly return in the coming weeks. The vaccination roll-out and the gradual easing of the lockdown restrictions coupled with the return of the warm weather will no doubt add momentum to the property market. We are still registering a healthy number of motivated purchasers every week and provided the property is marketed and priced correctly, they are still attracting a great deal of positive interest.

The lettings market over the past few months has also performed well with most of what we take on letting within days of launching. We have witnessed high levels of new applicants registering their search criteria but a lack of rental properties coming on to the market. With fewer instructions and more people searching, we are hoping to see a rise in prices over the coming months, especially as we enter the peak summer market. As before, those with outside space will have a better chance of securing a higher rental value in a quicker timescale.

Julian Masson is Branch Manager and Head of Sales at John D Wood & Co. in Turnham Green Terrace

John D Wood & Co.
68 Turnham Green Terrace,
Chiswick, London, W4 1QN
Tel: 020 8995 9394

Club Card offer

John D Wood & Co sponsors The Chiswick Calendar and are members of our Club Card scheme. If you’re thinking of selling your house, John D Wood & Co. offers our Club Card members a 35% discount on their standard sole agency fee. See more about their Club Card offer here: John D Wood & Co. Club Card offer.

Do I need to see a Chiropractor, Osteopath or Physiotherapist?

Guest blog by David Harvey, DC, MChiro

This is something all manual therapists will have to answer at some point or another; I have certainly been asked this question a fair few times.

I was faced with this question initially when I was in secondary school — during my GCSE years I made the decision to study chiropractic at university. When I told my teacher, she asked me out of genuine interest:

“What is the difference between a chiropractor and an osteopath?”

Like many others, she was suffering from lower back pain at the time. In fact, 4 out of 5 adults in the UK will experience lower back pain at some point in their lifetime, according to research.

This question was difficult to answer on the spot as a 15-year-old, but I would like to take this opportunity to provide some insight 12 years on, including studying at the Welsh Institute of Chiropractic, and 5 years of clinical experience, from that point.

With so many different professions, techniques and treatment modalities out there, it can often be difficult to know who to actually go and see for your specific problem, and when is the right time to do so. In this ‘Information age’ self-diagnosis and exercise prescription, based on a quick google or youtube search for your symptoms is not uncommon, but can be very misleading, and even dangerous in some cases. An outline of the similarities and differences between them will help you to make the right decision and get the service you need when you need it most.

To understand who to see and when you should see them, you must first be able to define each treatment modality individually, so that the similarities and differences between them are highlighted. If you are unsure, it is always best to seek professional advice.

What is Chiropractic?

Chiropractic is a healthcare system, based on the diagnosis and treatment of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, especially those of the spinal column, which cause dysfunction by affecting the nerves, which control both muscles and organs.

The best way to understand the term is to define the word itself. The prefix “Chiro-“ comes from Greek origin, and literally means ‘of the hand or hands’; and “-practic“ refers to a certain practice or experience/skill.

So in other words, a chiropractor is somebody who uses their hands to help relieve problems with the bones, muscles and joints. This will usually involve some spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), in combination with soft tissue work (STW), such as stretching or massage.

BUT the defining characteristic of chiropractic, in contrast to other professions, lies in its philosophy. The aim of any treatment is to improve the function of the nervous system.

In the UK, Chiropractors are governed and regulated by the General Chiropractic Council (GCC). Chiropractors need to complete an approved chiropractic degree, register with the GCC and meet the requirements of ‘The Code’ in order to practise in the UK. These criteria are essential to ensure that, in line with other health professionals, chiropractors are treating patients safely and to a consistently high standard.

Chiropractic is not widely available on the NHS, but it is provided in some areas. You do not need to see your GP before making an appointment with a chiropractor, but it’s best to seek some advice if you are unsure about what type of treatment may be best for you.

What is Osteopathy?

Osteopathy is a system of diagnosis and treatment for a wide range of medical conditions. It works with the structure and function of the body and is based on the principle that the wellbeing of an individual depends on the skeleton, muscles, ligaments and connective tissues functioning smoothly together.

Its name also derives from Ancient Greek, with “osteo-” referring to “bone”. The suffix “-pathy” also comes from Greek, and relates to curative treatment of a specific kind.

Osteopaths work to restore your body to a state of balance, where possible without the use of drugs or surgery. Osteopaths use touch, physical manipulation, stretching and massage to increase the mobility of joints, to relieve muscle tension, to enhance the blood and nerve supply to tissues, and to help your body’s own healing mechanisms. They may also provide advice on posture and exercise to aid recovery, promote health and prevent symptoms recurring.

All osteopaths in the UK are regulated by the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC).

Similarly, Osteopathy is not widely available on the NHS, nor is a GP referral required to see an Osteopath.

What is Physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy is a science-based profession and takes a ‘whole person’ approach to health and wellbeing, including the patient’s lifestyle. Physiotherapy aims to restore movement and function when someone is affected by an injury, illness or disability. It may also be used preventatively, in an attempt to reduce your risk of injury or illness in the future.

The term derives from Greek, with the word “Phusis” meaning nature, with the suffix “therapeia” meaning healing, however, the use of medicines, prescriptions, and injection therapy are within the scope of the UK physiotherapy profession.

Treatment sessions will typically involve some education/advice, movement/exercise, and some manual therapy (e.g. massage, mobilisation). Other techniques may also be utilised, such as dry needling, ultrasound, or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS).

To practise physiotherapy in the UK you must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), the UK’s regulatory body for health and care professionals. Physiotherapy is available through the NHS or privately. To have physiotherapy on the NHS, you may need a referral from your GP.

It is not uncommon for clinics and practices to be multidisciplinary, meaning they have several academic disciplines or professional specialisations working under one roof. Even where this is not the case, if you were to see a clinician who believed your condition or problem was beyond the scope of what they are able to help with, they would be likely to refer you to somebody better suited to your needs.

Since there is such a crossover in the technique of these three professions as well as the conditions they are able to address, the decision of who to see should be more heavily influenced by the level of the individual practitioner, rather than the profession itself; a good practitioner in any field will trump a bad one, regardless of their discipline. If you have a friend or family who has had positive experiences with their practitioner, for example, this may be a good place to start — if they were able to get good results, it stands to reason that you would too.

For more information on chiropractic, osteopathy, or physiotherapy, visit the websites of the respective governing bodies:

gcc-uk.org – General Chiropractic Council

osteopathy.org.uk – General Osteopathic Council

csp.org.uk – The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

David is the chiropractor at Health Shak in Chiswick

1 Acton Lane, Chiswick, W4 5RA – opposite Sainsbury’s and a few doors down from the party shop
Tel: 07570 609348
healthshak.co.uk

Club Card offer

Health Shak is a member of The Chiswick Calendar Club Card scheme and offers 20% off your Initial 3-Part Consultation (Normal price £120).

See more details of the Club Card offer here: Health Shak Club Card offer

 

Ruth Mayorcas named one of Cycling UK’s top 100 women in Cycling

Image above: Ruth when she won ‘best newcomer’ in the Hackney Wheelers Glamorous bike ride 

Cycling UK’s 100 Women in Cycling list celebrates ‘inspirational women who are encouraging others to experience the joy of cycling’. Ruth Mayorcas, who campaigns for safe cycling in Chiswick, has been picked as one of the 100 this year.

Every year the cyclists’ touring club highlight 100 exceptional women who promote cycling and encourage others to take part.

‘We celebrate inspirational women who are leading by example in this wonderful and life-enhancing activity. Women from all walks of life and every corner of the cycling world have been nominated, from mountain bikers and endurance cyclists to community group leaders, cycling school-run mums and industry entrepreneurs’.

Ruth campaigns relentlessly for safe cycling. She attends the London Assembly, conferences and council meetings, always advocating safe cycling, and in Chiswick championing Cycleway 9. She has taken part in demonstrations and protests (‘die-ins’) with the Stop Killing Cyclists campaign, alongside campaigning with London Cycling Campaign.

She also stood, unsuccessfully, for Labour in Chiswick in the last local council elections. She has attracted a lot of criticism locally from opponents of Cycleway 9, some of it personally abusive, but doesn’t let that put her off advocating for what she believes in.

Image above: Ruth Mayorcas

Learning about cycling in Amsterdam

She discovered an alternate view on cycling as a normal way of getting about a city while she was living in Amsterdam in the 1970s. It crystalised the idea that riding a bike can be normalised and made safe for all and motivated her to get involved in the Safe Routes to Schools campaign when she came back to London.

Ruth said:

“I passed my Cycling Proficiency age 11 but was fairly hopeless and didn’t really cycle until (age 23) living in Amsterdam in 1976 where it was so easy to control the bike and felt safe – I imported a Dutch Dames Fiets and cycled to work as much as I could. I cycled with my son in a kiddie seat, then alongside but it was not until joining EFR cycle coaching I gained the confidence to cycle longer distances and big hills!!

“I absolutely love cycling, it is such a great way to get about and share my love with as many people as possible – especially women who may feel it is not for them or are put off by what to wear or with feeling unsafe.

“I have campaigned for Cycleway 9 in Chiswick for the last 25 years, thrilled we have it and encourage especially women to use it. I taught my son to ride, rarely used a car, and he has a love of cycling as do I”.

I always hope that being seen at the age I am using a bike for shopping, socialising and holidays, other women will feel empowered to do likewise

Ruth Mayorcas

“I have a Dutch partner and we spend much of our time cycling in the Netherlands where it is just such a normal activity. I always hope that being seen at the age I am using a bike for shopping, socialising and holidays, other women will feel empowered to do likewise. I have become very proactive in raising awareness of how poor cycle infrastructure deters people, especially those with mobility issues.

“I am a key part of an online event called Ideas With Beers with Brian Deegan and Robert Davies where I bring the view of the older non-professional woman into focus”.

Image above: Ruth when she stood for election to LB Hounslow in 2018 

“Irrepressible and charming”

Ruth was nominated by Simon Lambourn, who said:

“Ruth is an irrepressible, persuasive and knowledgeable champion of normal, everyday cycling for all. She does not aspire to be a ‘hard rider’ but espouses everyday cycling wearing normal clothes as a natural part of life. Time spent in the Netherlands has increased her conviction that riding a bike needs to be – and can be – normalised and made safe for all: she is charming, eloquent and forceful even when confronting ingrained car-centric opposition.

“She is extremely well known, well-informed, and well-connected in her local area of West London and London as a whole”.

She was also nominated by her son Jack, who said:

“I can think of no better role model for what cycling could, and should be for most people. Since I can remember, my mum has been a passionate advocate for cycling for all. Not seeing it as a sport, or as something you need to prepare for, but just as a healthy and practical mode of transport.

“Away from campaigning and advocacy, the sheer number of miles Ruth covers is impressive in and of itself. Averaging around 500 miles a month this year, people are often gobsmacked when I tell them the distances she has covered”.

Image above: Ruth Mayorcas on a country bike rike

Cycling now a mainstream activity

Ruth told The Chiswick Calendar:

“I am thrilled to have been nominated, then selected for this fantastic scheme which is about enabling women from all backgrounds to feel that cycling is for them. As it says in my biog I started cycling in NL and continued here and was amongst a huge cohort of other women cycling.

“In the 80s sadly this dropped off such that only the very determined and mostly male were seen on bikes. I have long been an advocate for bike use for all for shopping, the school run, to work and to socialise.

“Now we have Gear Change (a white paper from government regarding Active travel) and cycling is returning to a mainstream activity – I just love seeing so many children cycling with their parents and feel sure this will continue to grow”.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: TfL and LB Hounslow claim C9 is a success

See also: TfL proposes changes to Cycleway 9

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Hogarth Club – Keeping the masks and the bookable swimming lanes

Image above: Hogarth Club pool

The Hogarth Centre has gone through several incarnations since March 2020.  First they opened up with outside activities only – tennis for example. They’ve moved lots of gym equipment outside and built separate pods in the open air. They started offering exercise classes by Zoom and made the cafe takeaway only. They also divided the swimming pool into lanes and made them bookable for half hour slots.

That’s an innovation which their clients reallly liked, says Sales and Marketing Director Tim Slater; they appreciate the freedom of having a lane they can call their own and use of the swimming pool has gone up by more than 300%, so they’re keeping the bookable lanes. They’re also keeping the wearing of masks inside the club and keeping the gym equipment and booths outside.

“We will require people to wear masks when they’re not exercising” he says. “We want to make the most vulnerable members feel comfortable.”

Images above: Hogarth Club

In December 2020 gyms were given separate status from the hospitality industry, with whom they’d been bracketed before. They don’t just provide fun, but have a positive contribution to make to people’s physical health and fitness – that is after all the point of them – as well as their mental health.

The gym equipment that’s still inside is either at least two metres from the next thing, or separated by a glass screen, and that’s how they will stay, says Tim. They are also keeping the social distancing arrangements in the changing rooms – vulnerable people come dressed ready to exercise and use the locker rooms. Anyone else uses the changing rooms, but no longer have to book a time to use them. They will just be asked to maintin social distancing.

The cafe has reopened and members will no longer have to stick to a one way system inside the club. Staff will continue to wear masks inside the club until further notice.

Image above: Hogarth Club pool

Reopening the sauna

They have since April 2021 been allowed to open their steam room and sauna, but haven’t until now, choosing to remain on the side of caution. They are about to open the sauna – rather ironically in the week when just sitting in the living room at home feels like entering a sauna – because the temperature of 70 – 90 degrees will kill off the virus. The sauna will be available for one person, or two from the same household. But they are not opening the steam room, as it’s not hot enough to kill off the virus.

In an email to members this week, they reiterated their ethos for the post July 19 era:

‘Please remember: others may be vulnerable for reasons you may not see, or may be close to someone who is high risk – a parent, a partner, a child, a housemate. We ask that you be safe, be considerate and be understanding of other Club users, to help make The Hogarth a welcoming place for all’.

Club Card offer

The Hogarth Club is a member of The Chiswick Calendar’s Club Card scheme, offering Club Card holders a reduced joining fee of £99 on all categories and, if you join the club on ‘Compact membership’, you will also receive an extra special offer of two months for price of one.

Benefit from free personal training sessions, a myriad classes, racquet sports and relax in the pool and spa during the hours 12-4pm weekdays and after 6.30pm on weekends. Other unique offers on different types of membership are also available to Club Card Holders. Ask on joining.

When you join up and come in for the first time as a member, enjoy a complientary smoothie in the cafe.

Contact the membership sales team at enquiries@thehogarth.co.uk and be part of something special! Tel: 0208 995 4600. Just tell them you’re a Club Card holder and take your card when you go along for the first time.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: End of Covid restrictions

See also: Gap opens up along towpath at Strand on the Green

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

End of Covid restrictions

Monday 19 July marked a controversial landmark in the seventeen month fight against Covid – the end of the legal mandatory use of face masks. In England, limits on how many people can meet or attend events were lifted, nightclubs were allowed to reopen, theatres permitted to return to full capacity, and table service is no longer be necessary in pubs and restaurants.

Some individuals – and the battered entertainment and hospitality industry – have been enthusiastic about the new rules. But what was originally dubbed “Freedom Day” by the Government has come under fire from medical experts both in the UK and abroad.

They warn of the danger of “letting Covid rip” at a time when many people are not double-vaccinated, and therefore not fully protected. There have been predictions that infections could rocket to 100,000 or even 200,000 per day.

Many members of the public also have concerns. The Economist recently said that a poll it commissioned from Ipsos MORI showed that:

“two-thirds think masks, social distancing and travel restrictions should continue for another month. A majority would support them until covid-19 is controlled worldwide, which may take years. “

Over the past week, the Government has become less gung-ho, with Boris Johnson saying he still expects face coverings to be worn busy places and on public transport. Even as I write this. Boris has announced that full vaccination will be a condition for being allowed into nightclubs from the autumn.

So what can you expect while travelling, shopping and visiting entertainment venues in Chiswick?

Image above: Turnham Green Terrace station; photograph Jon Perry

Public Transport

Transport for London: The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, was quick off the mark, insisting that face coverings will be required on TfL services as “a condition of carriage”, unless you have a medical reason for exemption. Enforcement officers will be deployed to oversee this rule.

Mainline rail service from Chiswick: The rules are less strict if you’re travelling by mainline train, with face coverings not being enforced. Train operators have argued that trains have windows and are better ventilated than the Underground. Over the weekend, South Western Railway’s website said:

“we will remove advice about social distancing and will expect passengers, out of respect for others, to wear face coverings in crowded places.”

Uber taxis and Uber branded ferries – face masks will continue to be required for both drivers and passengers. Uber has said anyone flouting these rules repeatedly:

“will permanently lose their access to the Uber platform.”

Image above: Library picture of a medical centre

Doctors, Dentists and NHS healthcare sites

Guidance from Public Health England, sent to all hospitals, GP surgeries, dental practices and pharmacies makes it clear that the “optional mask” policy does not apply to healthcare settings. Peter Lwin, Practice Manager of Holly Road Medical Centre just off the High Road, says:

”We’re especially keen on insisting on the wearing of masks when a patient is insisting they want to see doctor or nurse, because of physical contact.”

He says other Covid protocols which will continue include reduced seating in waiting rooms and doctors initially consulting patients over the phone before deciding who needs to have a physical examination.

High Road supermarkets and chains

The Government says it “expects and recommends” that people wear masks in crowded indoor spaces.

Bookshop Waterstones and Boots the chemist say they’ll be encouraging people to continue wearing masks, as are our three High Road supermarkets, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose and Tesco. However, Sainsbury’s has stipulated that its staff will be allowed to choose not to mask up if they are working behind screens.

The award-winning frozen food business, COOK, on Chiswick Lane, will also continue to ask people to wear masks. It will continue to provide a supply of fresh masks for customers who might have forgotten to bring one along.

The Chiswick High Road interiors shop, Decorexi, Tweeted:

“please continue to wear your masks…to protect our shoppers and staff. Thanking you all in advance for considering others.”

Images above: The Roebuck pub on Chiswick High Rd

Pubs

Fullers, whose Chiswick pubs include the Bell and Crown, the George IV, the Old Pack Horse and The Pilot, says it’s aiming for “spontaneity and flexibility.” A spokesperson said:

“if you want to wear a mask, pre-book, or be served at your table, that’s fine – but equally we will welcome you if you want to stand at the bar or just turn up on the off chance of bumping into some old friends. The same is true for our teams too – so it will be up to them if they want to wear a mask or not and we will fully support whatever decision they take.”

Josh at the Roebuck emailed customers to say the pub was aiming at striking the “right balance” between loosening up the restrictions and ensuring continued safety and wellbeing. He said they’lll continue to sanitise tables between use, “are still mindful of the spacing of our tables”, and will ensure good ventilation. The email adds that:

“some of our crew and customers alike will choose to carry on wearing a face covering, which we respect.”

Image above: Chiswick Playhouse above the Tabard pub

Entertainment

The new Chiswick Cinema on the High Road is intending to sell tickets from 23 July without socially distanced seats.

Chiswick Playhouse: This small 90 seater venue, currently basking in the glow of a four-star review from The Guardian for its latest production, new musical From Here, was due to return to full capacity audiences on Monday 19 July.

Social distancing is required in the foyer and stairwell and theatregoers are asked to use the NHS Track and Trace app on entry. Increased cleaning protocols remain in place and fogging machines are being used before and after performances to sanitise the theatre. However, face masks will be worn at the audience’s discretion.

Riverside Studios in Hammersmith had also been hoping to lift social distancing measures and move to full capacity audiences. Last week it announced that it was selling extra tickets for the forthcoming Mischief Movie Night In and an August production of The Browning Version directed by, and starring, Sir Kenneth Branagh.  But it’s now been announced that The Browning Version run has been cancelled after “Covid-enforced absences” prevented people from attending rehearsals.

In a Tweet, Riverside said “We’re gutted at the news that the BROWNING VERSION has had to cancel their planned August season. We wish the affected cast members well, and a speedy recovery. If you bought tickets to the show you don’t need to do anything – all purchases will be refunded over the coming week”.

On Monday, theatre staff confirmed by phone that it’s hoped that “Mischief Movie Night In” will go ahead this week, but will probably be at half capacity.

The venue also put out a Tweet announcing:

“We have decided to maintain social distancing in all of our cinemas for the time being. We’re committed to being a safe and comfortable venue – and if that means sacrificing a few extra ticket sales, we’re OK with that trade-off”.

In another email sent last week, Riverside Studios said its staff would continue wearing masks and would encourage customers to do the same. It would be keeping many Covid protocols in place, including deep-cleaning. Staff are being tested daily.

Image above: Outdoor gym

Gyms

Virgin Active which operates the Riverside and Chiswick Business Park Gyms says:

“From 19 July, you’ll no longer be required to wear a face covering in club, however we ask that you respect members who still want to wear them. Similarly, we ask that you respect distance between our other members to make social distancing possible for those who want it.

“Our team will continue to wear masks around (the) club to keep you and our other team members safe.”

Virgin Active says there will be “more space” in kids’and outdoor pools, more outdoor loungers will be added and all pool floats will be brought back. All lockers are being reopened, and tables and chairs reintroduced into lounges to give people more space to relax after their workouts.

The Hogarth Club on the other hand, will require people to wear masks when not actually exercising. Their cafe is now open again and they have decided to keep the pool divided into lanes which are bookable for half hour slots. They are also reopening their sauna, but not the steam room because at 70 – 90 degrees, the sauna is hot enough to kill the virus.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Lib Dems ask SWR to keep mask wearing on trains

See also: Sadiq Khan launches massive campaign to get Londoners back on the Tube

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Fabulous food for back garden get togethers

Images above: Asparagus, pea, radish and mint salad; Crudites platter with Green Goddess Dip

From Jules the Foodie

Now that the weather is finally looking like summer and social distancing restrictions have been lifted, many people are beginning to have friends round for a drink and some food in the back garden.

Juliet Kane, aka Jules The Foodie – julesthefoodie.com – does fabulous freshly cooked food which is both delicious and nutritious (which the editor of The Chiswick Calendar can vouch for personally by the way, this is not just PR hyperbole).

Having launched her deliver-straight-to-your-home food delivery business in Chiswick last year, her baseline offer is all the ‘fridge fill’ dishes on her website, topped up with weekly specials – different dishes each week – for those who have signed up to her menu mailout.

In addition to that, her bespoke catering for events is now coming into its own. When I say ‘events’ it could be a big do, like a wedding, but it might also be a small affair. The point is, you don’t have to do the cooking yourself. She will either bring you dishes ready prepared for you to heat up and serve, or if you prefer, come and oversee the serving in your kitchen.

All her food is prepared in her professional kitchen, just off Turnham Green Terrace.

Sample menu

Images above: Indian vegetable and lentil samosas; Greek Mezze menu delivery a set menu to choose from for a Greek inspired evening

Savoury bites – ideal for a starter, canapés or snacks

Indian vegetable & lentil samosas
Greek feta & spinach filo rolls
Roast sweet potato & black bean cakes with tomato salsa
Mini baked potatoes with sour cream & chives
Caramelised red onion & parmesan puffs
Smoked salmon rolls with dill & caper cream cheese
Tuna & potato cakes with spring onions & wasabi mayo
Spiced lamb kofta with mint yoghurt

Images above: Seared tuna Nicoise salad; Roast wasabi salmon with pac choi & rainbow rice noodles

Main courses

-Burrata with roast Romano peppers with white beans, tomatoes & kalamata olives & mint
-Caramelised red onion & summer vegetable tart with parmesan & herb crust
-Panzanella salad with marinated tomatoes, basil & with goat’s cheese bruschetta
-Slow roast aubergine wedges with tahini, pomegranate & feta with lemon & dill dressing
-Beetroot & chick pea falafel with tatziki & toasted pumpkin seeds
-Seared tuna steak Niçoise platter with new potatoes, olives, free range egg & green beans with Kalamata olives
-Sesame baked salmon fillet with marinated fennel & watercress salad
-Coronation chicken salad with golden raisins & garam marsala & mango dressing
-Goat’s cheese & butternut squash & asparagus tart
-Parma ham & goat’s cheese & cherry tomato skewers with rocket pesto dressing
-Smoked mackerel, dill & potato cakes with caper mayonnaise & rocket salad
-Spanish potato & onion tortilla with aioli & padron peppers
-Tuna & potato cakes with spring onions & wasabi mayo, watercress
– Marinated Thai prawns with pickled cucumber, Chinese leaf, chilli & mint salad
– Seared Macken’s fillet of beef with capers, parmesan shavings, rocket & mustard dressing (£2 supplement)

Images above: Roast cauliflower, cous cous salad with baby spinach, coriander & caramelised red onions; Feta salad

Salads

-Roast butternut squash & barley salad with mint, crumbled feta & radish
-Puy lentil, soy roast aubergine & parsley salad with balsamic dressing
-Rainbow slaw with radish, sesame & soy dressing
-Roast cauliflower, spinach, toasted pumpkin seeds & roast shallots with creamy tahini dressing
-Greek salad with Kalamata olives & oregano
-Penne salad with roast red onions, peas & basil dressing
-Smoked paprika chick peas with roast red pepper, rocket & pomegranate dressing
-Roast vegetables with goat’s cheese & basil dressing

Images above: A fresh tray of chocolate brownies; Jules at work in the kitchen

Puddings

-Cacao, cashew & coconut bites
-Raspberry & frangipane tart with lemon mascarpone
-Molten dark chocolate brownies with orange crème fraîche & marinated strawberries
-Lemon posset jars with ginger crumble
-Orange & polenta cake with fresh raspberries & Greek yoghurt

Images above: ‘Cheesewick, specially created for Chiswick Cheese Market; British Award winning Cheese Grazing board

Jules trained at Leith’s School of Food & Wine at 16, she gained experience at some of London’s best restaurants including Le Gavroche and Bibendum and has travelled the world cooking. She  was lucky enough to be mentored by the ‘godfather of modern British cookery’, Alastair Little. Born and brought up in Chiswick, she now has her own family here.

She was most recently Operations Director at Crucial Food based at the Hogarth Club, before setting up her own food delivery business. She is also one of the group of women who run the Chiswick Cheese Market. Jules’ role is to ‘curate’ the market by talking to potential stall holders and finding out about their produce, putting together an interesting mix of difernt types of cheese which complement those on sale already in Chiswick.

Contact Jules on 07773 344473 or by email at hello@julesthefoodie.com

Sign up for her weekly specials menu on her website.

julesthefoodie.com

Club Card member

Jules The Foodie is a member of The Chiswick Calendar’s Club Card scheme. Holders of a Chiswick Calendar Club Card receive an extra little something with each order (minimum order £30 for local delivery): two free molten chocolate brownies or a taster bag of homemade granola.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Cheese Market

See also: Top Ten Things To Do in Chiswick, west London

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.