Man jailed for raping and filming woman in Ealing

Image above: a Metropolitan Police officer, convicted rapist Hubert Greliak

A man has been sentenced for 18 years for raping and sexually assaulting a woman in Ealing while filming the offences on his mobile phone.

Hubert Greliak, 33, was also handed a restraining order against the victim, Julianna Terlizzi, at Isleworth Crown Court on Tuesday (12 April). He will serve 13-and-a-half years in prison with the remaining time on licence.

Greliak was previously found guilty of rape and assault by penetration at the same court on 7 January following a trial. In January 2020, Juliana – who has waived her legal right to anonymity, reported the sexual assault to police. The Local Safeguarding team immediately launched an investigation.

Once Greliak was arrested and his phone was seized, he refused to hand over the pin code. Greliak was charged in March 2020 with sexual assault, theft and failure to comply with a section 49 notice requiring him to provide his pin code.

Meanwhile the victim’s hard drive was sent off for testing and in February 2021 it revealed evidence of her rape. Greliak was further charged with rape. At the time Juliana was attacked she was in a relationship with Greliak. She said he drugged her, and he was convicted at Isleworth crown court for then raping her and filming the attack.

Greliak was bailed by the police and breached his bail conditions. The Met’s Predatory Offender Unit, a proactive safeguarding team who tackle high harm offenders, set to out find and arrest him, resulting in Greliak being fitted with an electronic tag.

Met accused of missing earlier opportunities to charge Greliak

Other women have come forward and spoken to the Guardian newspaper giving their accounts of being similarly abused by Greliak. They say the Met missed a number of opportunities to charge him sooner.

These women, who reported their own experiences to the police, say Greliak is a serial attacker and allege the force mishandled their claims. At least two women came forward and made statements to the police after Greliak’s arrest in 2020. One said she had been put off after her contact with the Met and another said police just seemed to give up on her case, with one officer making an offensive remark.

Juliana tracked down other women through social media who made claims against Greliak, stretching over 11 years. The women fear Greliak may remain a danger to women after his release from prison.

Juliana spoke to Greliak’s past girlfriends and partners and found 10 others who she said complained about his behaviour, with allegations ranging from rape and assault to controlling and abusive behaviour. One woman who alleges she was raped during a five-year relationship with Greliak says police mishandled her case.

Image above: Juliana Terlizzi – who has waived her legal right to anonymity (taken from YouTube)

Victim says Met “treated her like a criminal”

Juliana told the Guardian she became convinced as her case progressed that her attacker was breaching his bail conditions but she said police did not take her seriously:

“They said I was overreacting, overthinking things. They said I should go to the doctor and get medication.”

When it was proved she was right Greliak’s bail was revoked.

She said she was asked to give detectives access to her phones, computers and social media:

“The police treated me as a suspect and made it almost unbearable for me to support the case moving forward. It was almost as if they wanted me to give up and drop the case, which had a huge impact on my mental health.”

The Met said the victim who pressed charges was supported by specialist officers and partner agencies throughout the investigation – the specialist officer from the Sexual Offences Investigation Team was also thanked by the victim. The Judge awarded the investigating officer a Judge’s Commendation for his ‘diligence and professionalism’ throughout the trial.

Met praises victim’s bravery & insist survivors will be ‘taken seriously’

Detective Inspector Julian Crabb from West Area Command Unit Safeguarding Team said:

“We are absolutely committed to tackling all forms of violence against women and girls and are dedicated to achieving criminal justice outcomes for victim-survivors as we have in this case.

“The victim bravely went through the ordeal of a trial and thanks to both her compelling evidence and the work of the investigation team, we were able to put this man behind bars for a long time.

“Greliak is a dangerous and manipulative individual. He has showed no remorse or guilt for his disturbing and destructive actions. I sincerely hope the victim can begin to achieve closure and focus on the future.

“Investigations into rape and sexual assault are often complex, and I am pleased the investigating officers’ actions were commended by HH Judge Hammerton. I hope this gives survivors of sexual violence the confidence to come forward and report to police.”

The Met urge anyone who has been a victim of sexual assault to report it directly to police on 101 or via their website (met.police.uk/ro/report/ocr/af/how-to-report-a-crime/).

The Met say survivors’ allegations will always be taken seriously by officers and victims will be fully supported.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: LB Hounslow gives homeless camp on Turnham Green five days to disperse

See also: Four arrested in oil tanker protest at Chiswick roundabout

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Noble Yeats winning the Grand National is an omen says Cahal Dallat

Image above: Grand National winner Noble Yeats in Sam Waley-Cohen’s final ride – picture BBC Sport

Noble Yeats and Nobel Yeats

It’s an omen! Seeing a horse called “Noble Yeats” win the Grand National can only be seen as a good omen in the year in which a sculpture designed to celebrate the Nobel winning poet and his connections with Bedford Park is erected outside St Michael & All Angels Church, says Cahal Dallat.

It is also a timely reminder that William Butler’s younger brother Jack was no slouch himself. Somewhat overshadowed by his sibling, Jack became a famous painter, whose work featured horses.

Cahal Dallat, founder / organiser of the WB Yeats Bedford Park Project has written a guest blog for The Chiswick Calendar about the Other Yeats. Cahal will be giving a lecture at St Michael and All Angels on Wednesday, 20 April at 7.30 pm (free public event, no booking required, all welcome) on the Yeatses and how the Yeats project is going.

Images above: “The Gypsy Jockey” by Jack B Yeats; portrait of the artist

The Other Yeats

By Cahal Dallat

Last Saturday’s Grand National win by fifty-to-one outsider “Noble Yeats” is evidence the Yeats name is never far from the news and that the tall house with its regulation Bedford Park picket fence at No. 3 Blenheim Road produced not one, but two, outstanding geniuses.

National winner “Noble Yeats” (b. 2015) was sired by a horse called “Yeats” (b. 2000) named after Willie Yeats’s young brother and famous painter, Jack, who attended Chiswick School of Art (where ArtsEd is now situated) and did his first drawings for the suitably alternative-ish/Bedford-Park-ish Vegetarian magazine.

Jack would move into Expressionism in the 1920s and become Ireland’s leading 20thcentury artist, and the first whose paintings sold for over a million pounds: Reverie (1931), for example, sold for £1.2 million in 2019.

Like many migrant families, when times were tight (as father, John Butler Yeats, struggled to find work as a portrait painter), the Yeats children often found themselves shuffled off to live with grandparents in Sligo.

Image above: Jack B Yeats, “The Jockey”

Jack, the youngest, spent much more time there and became fascinated by fairs, circuses and the races at Strandhill. So much so that, back in London and trained as an artist, his work continually featured horses, both in his illustrator phase and as he moved into bleaker and more surreal landscapes and settings that had echoes of the bleak postwar vision portrayed in drama by his friend Samuel Beckett and in sculpture by Alberto Giacometti.

Jack would also become the first person to win an Olympic Medal for Ireland (though he was born in London!) as the modern Olympic Games initially featured an “arts and culture” segment like their Ancient Greek predecessors.

The winning painting, The Liffey Swim, together with his portraits of racing, boxing and acrobatics remind us that Jack was the sportsman of the family, taking a completely different strand of his West of Ireland heritage from Willie, who preferred the landscape, legends and lore of their mother’s home county of Sligo.

Image above: From the later Expressionist period: Jack B Yeats “From Portacloy to Rathlin O’Beirne” (Hunt Museum,
Limerick)

“Outsiders” all

So the younger Yeats would have been delighted to see “Noble Yeats” pass the winning post on Saturday as a fifty-to-one outsider rather as he and his older brother felt themselves very much “outsiders” in London…

Outsiders, at least until they came to Bedford Park and found a community and a neighbourhood where radical, progressive artistic ideas were the norm and where the creative imagination was nurtured.

A community which is now not only honoring Willie’s world-famous literary achievement with London’s latest, dazzling, literary landmark and a total arts/educational/heritage wraparound visitor experience and smartphone Yeats Walk, but celebrating the first-garden-suburb’s fostering of an Irish exile family that produced two geniuses and contributed so many of our late-twentieth and early-twenty-first century ideas a hundred years before their time.

Image above: The Woodstock Road house where the Yeats family moved when young Willie (WB Yeats) was enrolled at Godolphin in Hammersmith, which was a boys’ school in the 1870s/1880s

What did WB Yeats ever do for Bedford Park (and vice versa)?

I will be giving lots more on the amazing history of Bedford Park, and WB Yeats, and the Yeats family, next Wednesday night, (20 April) with a lecture and update on the project, introduced by Fr. Kevin Morris, Vicar of St. Michael and All Angels, the Yeatses’ family parish church from 1879.

The lecture, with Yeats readings from poet Anne-Marie Fyfe, isn’t just for anyone who wanted to know more about Nobel-Prize-winning poet Yeats, a local schoolboy from an Irish migrant family who went on to outstanding international literary fame and major cultural importance in the first half of the twentieth century…

…it’s also for those who want to know why Yeats matters to Bedford Park so much more than the many other writers and artists (Irish, Scottish, Indian, Ukrainian, French, American and – of course – English) who inhabited and frequented the unique housing/community experiment that became the world’s first garden suburb.

What did WB Yeats ever do for Bedford Park (and vice versa)?” 7.30 pm, Wednesday 20 April, St Michael and All Angels Church, Bath Rd.

Info on: www.wbyeatsbedfordpark.com

Contact: cahal.dallat@wbyeatsbedfordpark.com

Image above: Computer Generated Image of Enwrought Light by Conrad Shawcross RA, inspired by WB Yeats, which will honour the poet, just yards from his childhood home and beside the path on which he walked daily to school, here at the entrance to Chiswick’s unique Bedford Park garden-suburb/artist’s colony

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: What’s On for Children over Easter

See also: Easter at Hen Corner – the chicks are hatching

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Ruth Cadbury MP calls on Government to close loophole causing ‘soaring energy bills’

Image above: Ruth Cadbury MP

The MP for Brentford and Isleworth, Ruth Cadbury has written to the Government’s Energy Minister Greg Hands to take urgent action to fix a loophole, which means that some leaseholders in residential flats could face soaring energy bills.

While people living in residential houses are protected by the ‘Energy price gap’, experts warn 500,000 leaseholders and tenants living in some blocks of flats are not covered as they are deemed as living in a ‘commercial building’ with a communal energy supply. This means that many residents, including those living in Hounslow, have faced soaring energy bills without any cap.

While wholesale prices continue to climb steeply, the UK’s price cap on energy bills stops companies from immediately passing those costs on to their domestic customers, but there is no such protection for commercial rates.

Campaigners around the UK have been calling on Ofgem to urgently review the situation and revisit the definition of ‘Domestic Customer’ since January 2022. A campaign by Birmingham based Ginger Energy, which operates across the UK, started a petition in the hopes of forcing Ofgem to rethink the definition. As of yet no decision has been announced.

You can view the petition here: change.org

Image above: Energy crisis artwork used by Ginger Energy

Leaseholders and tenants face “an even greater rise” in their energy bills

Speaking after sending her letter to Greg Hands, Ruth Cadbury said:

‘‘The soaring price of energy bills is having a huge impact on so many residents. I was shocked to hear from leaseholders and tenants locally who are now facing an even greater rise in their bill due to a loophole in the Governments energy price cap.

“I’ve written directly to the Government to urge them to fix this loophole and ensure that people locally are protected from skyrocketing prices.

“However, I still believe the Government need to go further to tackle the high cost of energy bills. I’ve called on the Government to introduce a windfall tax on oil and gas producers, who’ve made a record profit over the last year. Higher energy bills, rising food costs and stagnant wages mean that so many families locally are struggling to make ends meet. We need to see urgent action from the Government to address this.’’

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Man jailed for raping and filming woman in Ealing

See also: Chiswick’s new Vinyl shop opens Friday 15 April

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist).

Click here to support us.

Chiswick In Pictures launch at the Clayton hotel

We had a fantastic turnout last week for the launch of The Chiswick Calendar’s Chiswick In Pictures exhibition at the Clayton Hotel Chiswick.

Fear not if you could’t get there, as the exhibition is on until Sunday 8 May, featuring the work of 15 local artists who have chosen Chiswick and west London as their inspiration:

Anna Kunst, Arabella Harcourt-Cooze, Carol Tait, Frank Noon, Hugh Bredin, Isobel Johnstone, Jane Price, Jennifer Griffiths, Jill Spearman, Madeleine Marsh, Naila Hazell, Nick Raikes, Rachel Busch, Rennie Pilgrem and Sandy Wall.

Come and browse the oils and watercolours, prints, photographs and mixed media creations in the atrium of the hotel at any time until Sunday 8 May, as the hotel is open 24/7, so you can go when you like.

Our thanks to Spismith and the Clayton hotel for providing the booze and the space.

See all the artists taking part in the exhibition here: Chiswick in Pictures exhibition 2022.

If you would like to buy a picture, please email Bridget at bridget.osborne@gmail.com or text 07738 752466.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Rock & Rose opening in Chiswick High Rd Tuesday 19 April

See also: Chiswick’s new Vinyl shop opens Friday 15 April

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Chiswick Cheese Market – What’s new at the Easter market

Chiswick Cheese Market takes place on Easter Sunday. Abigail Barlow, one of the organisers, shares her tips from the previous market on what to look out for at this one.

New in at the Chiswick Cheese Market

By Abigail Barlow

It was a beautiful day at The Cheese Market on Sunday 20 March and we had a full house of traders both regular and new.

Among the new …

Image above: Queso de Untar Cremoso’ 

Roi brought some fantastic Spanish cheeses with him and I was lucky enough to be able to buy one of the ‘Queso de Untar Cremoso’ – these white rinded spheres contained the most unctuous delishousness I have ever encountered.

It’s a sheep cheese made with thistle rennet so you get some complex floral aromas as well the incredible taste. Not too strong, just well balanced and perfect for dipping with bread sticks.

Image above: Yorkshire Pecorino

I also tried the Yorkshire Pecorino from James Grant – the very knowledgeable owner of No. 2 Pound St. This sheep’s cheese was aged for eight months and tasted nutty as well as having some nice acidity and piquancy. Really very good indeed on a cheeseboard or grated onto pasta.

Image above: Cornich Jack

Lastly I bought a piece of Cornish Jack from new trader – Deli No. 5. This is an Emmental style cheese made by artisan cheesemakers near Port Isaac. It was supple and milky with a slight sweetness balanced by a fruity tang. I will be buying it again!

Image above: Join the big hunt at Chiswick Cheese Market

Join the big hunt at Chiswick Cheese Market

The next market is Sunday 17 April – Easter Sunday – come and buy your Easter cheeseboard early – we open at 9.30am. As it is Easter, there will be an Easter activity for children. Join the big hunt among the cheese stalls, with a prize for every completed entry.

PS

HUGE thank you to all who bought from our pre-loved cookbook stall – we raised £500 for the Ukraine DEC appeal.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: What’s On for Children over Easter

See also: Easter at Hen Corner – the chicks are hatching

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Rock & Rose opening in Chiswick High Rd Tuesday 19 April 

Image above: Rock & Rose, Richmond

Lorraine Angliss, who runs the popular Annie’s restaurant at Strand on the Green and Little Bird cocktail bar and restaurant in Grove Park, is opening her third Chiswick venue – the biggest of them all – in Chiswick High Rd on Tuesday 19 April.

She is opening Rock & Rose at 270-272 Chiswick High Rd, where Bill’s restaurant used to be, as a sister restaurant to her Rock & Rose restaurant in Richmond.

“We are just having a soft launch” she told The Chiswick Calendar, “we have decided to open without a party or anything special, just open quietly evenings only for the first week and lunchtime and evenings the week after.”

Image above: Cocktail bar at Rock & Rose

The new restaurant will share the vision of Rock & Rose in Richmond:

“to create a stylish, glamorous restaurant and cocktail bar where customers and comfort are a priority and offers a sense of excitement for customers so that they feel very special.”

In all Lorraine’s restaurants she creates a very stylish atmosphere with lots of bright, bold colours, flowery fabrics, velvets, tassles, an eclectic mix of furniture and cut flowers, representing her own unique, feminine and flamboyant style.

The food will be very similar to that at Rock & Rose in Richmond: Mediterranean and Asian influenced dishes and interesting cocktails.

House specials in the spring 2022 menu include Fresh Cornish Crab Risotto, Slow Roast Pork Belly, Monkfish and Tiger Prawn Curry, Calves Liver and Chicken Milanese. See the whole menu here: Rock & Rose menu

Image above: Rock & Rose furnishings

Lorraine set up Annie’s, her first restaurant, 20 years ago on Thames Rd, offering a chic but cosy, eclectic decor with lots of velvet and flowers in evidence reflecting her personal taste and crowd-pleasing food. The neighbourhood restaurant quickly became a hit on a site where several other restaurants had failed.

She went on to open Rock & Rose in Richmond, another restaurant in Barnes which has since closed and Little Bird, a cocktail bar on Burlington Lane in the row of shops opposite Chiswick station.

Image above: Lorraine Angliss outside Little Bird in Grove Park

She learned the restaurant trade from her family in Spain and managed the Rolling Stones’ restaurant Sticky Fingers in High Street Kensington. The Stones opened Sticky Fingers in 1989, decorating it with rock and roll memorabilia.

They sold it to Maxwell’s Restaurant Group in 2000, with Bill Wyman retaining a share, but it closed in June 2021 after 32 years of trading.

Image above: Rock & Rose furnishings

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Lorraine Angliss profile

See also: Owner of Annie’s opens Rock & Rose in Chiswick High Rd

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Episode 85: Suing the ECB? Former board member and Somerset chairman Andy Nash suggests how to resist its destruction of English cricket

Cricket authors (and obsessives) Peter Oborne and Richard Heller launched a podcast early in 2020 to help deprived listeners endure a world without cricket. They’re no longer deprived of cricket, but still chat regularly about cricket topics with different guests each week – cricket writers, players, administrators and fans – hoping to keep a good line and length but with occasional wides into other subjects.

After a varied and highly successful business career, Andy Nash was chairman of Somerset County Cricket Club for ten years full of achievement on and off the field. He became a non-executive director of the England and Wales Cricket Board,  but resigned dramatically and publically over fundamental issues. As the guest of Peter Oborne and Richard Heller in their latest cricket-themed podcast he forensically dissects the ECB’s errors and failures in running English cricket – and tells fans how to oppose them.


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Andy first relates a Somerset fairytale. He told it to a crowd of children of 7 upwards from the county’s age-group teams in the “players’ pathway” and their families and they were awed by the true story of the farmer’s boy, Harold Gimblett.  Rejected before the end of his trial with the county, he was then summoned into the side to a distant ground as an emergency replacement. After missing the early bus from his home village, he hitched a lift on a milk lorry, reached the ground late, was thrust in at number 8 after Somerset had crumbled to 107 for six – and scored a century in 63 minutes with faultless strokeplay. Somerset won the match. The following year, 1936, he played three Test matches for England. After over 350 other matches for Somerset, he remains by some distance its highest first-class run-scorer.

To Andy, Gimblett’s story represents the essence of English county cricket and gives children a timeless lesson, not to be branded as a failure and believe in their ability. He mentions later Gimbletts: the talent Somerset has uncovered by strongly-developed local scouting networks all over the South-West of England, including Marcus Trescothick, Jos Buttler and, recently, the all-rounder Lewis Goldsworthy from Camborne, Cornwall, one of the most economically-deprived areas in Europe.

He suggests that Somerset’s efforts highlight the importance of county cricket in providing pathways for talented cricketers: it takes responsibility for this in Devon and Cornwall, and shares Dorset with Hampshire CCC and Wiltshire with Gloucestershire CCC. For this reason alone he passionately opposes the ECB’s apparent intention to reduce the number of first-class counties. This would definitely reduce the chance of discovery in the English game for both men and women. He fiercely attacks the franchise system apparently sought by the ECB and expressed in the Hundred. Franchises do not develop talent or grounds and infrastructure: they simply exploit those developed by others as long-term investment. He suggests that there is no evidence that English fans follow franchises in any sport rather than historic teams rooted in localities. He notes that the Indian Premier League and the Australian Big Bash are beginning to falter.

He explains his motives for resigning from the ECB, especially over its apparent ambition to limit first-class cricket to major English cities. He demolishes, on demographic grounds, the frequent comparisons made between this plan and the Australian Sheffield Shield.

He cites the 2016 proposal for a two-tier T20 competition between the counties with promotion and relegation. It could have continued the success of T20 in winning new audiences and revenues for the counties and inducing fans to migrate to longer forms of the game. It would have obviated the need to create the Hundred, bypassing the counties in favour of synthetic teams with no local identity. He repeats his description of the Hundred as a “wrecking ball” for the English game, one which has undermined the county-based T20 Blast competition and, above all, forced the first-class County Championship into the margins of the English season, in months when pitches and weather conditions tend to be at their worst and potential spectators have the least leisure and motive to watch. The devaluing of the County Championship had generated an unprecedented run of failure in English Test cricket – still far and away the game’s biggest source of following and revenue and investment capital.

He suggests that the ECB’s prime strategy is to centralize control of the game whatever the consequences. Clearly they would prefer to concentrate cricket into eight ECB franchises in preference to eighteen autonomous counties. The ECB’s ambitions had been abetted by interested parties in the media, but he noted that David Lloyd had recanted his support for the Hundred on leaving Sky Sports, and many other respected figures in the game were passionately opposing the assault on county cricket. There was no evidence for success of the Hundred and growing awareness of its weakening of English cricket which the ECB was charged with protecting.

He explains the murky structure and responsibilities of the ECB as a limited company with a constitution. Although the eighteen first-class counties owned a substantial block of the shares they rarely acted as one. Given the devastating effect of Covid on their revenues, some were understandably attracted by the ECB’s project of a cull in their number and the hope of a larger share of the game’s future media revenues. He notes that many of the larger counties, with Test grounds, were carrying the biggest current debt.

He speculates that the ECB’s ambitions towards counties would face litigation and be tested in the courts against its constitutional duties towards English cricket. Fans were already showing far greater activism in their counties and were seeking to mandate their club chairs to preserve the game. If they succeed with enough counties the ECB would be blocked.

He describes his experience giving evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Culture, Media and Sport in 2019, for an inquiry unfortunately overtaken by the election that year. The reconstituted Select Committee had understandably refocused on issues of racism and diversity in the game, and helped to expose the ECB’s response, weakened and confused by its competing responsibilities for regulating the game and promoting it. He thought that the ultimate beneficial outcome would be an independent Regulator.

Far from culling the first-class counties, the ECB should consider increasing them to 24, in three divisions. This would entail killing the Hundred. The ECB and others believed in the myth that county cricket was dying, but overlooked their huge and growing following on social media and through streaming. He cited Somerset’s figures, not only within the county but through the wide geographic spread of the South West. All the county game needed was appropriate support and marketing – yet the ECB had almost totally ignored the opening of the County Championship programme on 7 April. By historic standards, this was grotesquely early and would increase players’ risk of injury. In a greatly shortened programme (in five instalments) some counties could find their hopes of the Championship virtually extinguished before May.  The season offered nothing to Taunton spectators in the holiday month of August except a few 50-over games from which Somerset would lose nine of their best players, and other counties were similarly affected. He calls for the Championship to be restored throughout the season and suggests how it could be interweaved with T20.

Andy concludes with confidence that the ECB’s obsessions with centralizing and monetizing the game can be resisted and that English cricket’s wider values can be restored. He anticipates an explosion if, as thought to be imminent, the ECB signs a ten-year media deal centred around the Hundred. This could be the trigger for litigation. He suggests means of resistance for fans against the ECB: joining a county club and making their views known to its chair; writing to their MP or the Minister of Sport; joining the Cricket Supporters Association and follow County Cricket Matters (founded by previous guest Annie Chave).

Like other previous guests he is challenged to name the current Minister of Sport. The outcome is revealed at the end of the podcast.

Get in touch with us by emailing obornehellercricket@outlook.com, we would love to hear from you!

Listen to more episodes of Oborne & Heller

Previous Episode – Episode 84: Some searing yorkers at wreckers of cricket

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Peter Oborne & Richard Heller

Peter Oborne has been the chief political commentator for the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, a maker of several documentaries and written and broadcast for many different media. He is the author of a biography of Basil D’Oliveira and of Wounded Tiger, a history of Pakistan cricket, both of which won major awards.

Richard Heller was a long-serving humorous columnist on The Mail on Sunday and more briefly, on The Times. He worked in the movie business in the United States and the UK, including a brief engagement on a motion picture called Cycle Sluts Versus The Zombie Ghouls. He is the author of two cricket-themed novels A Tale of Ten Wickets and The Network. He appeared in two Mastermind finals: in the first his special subject was the life of Sir Gary Sobers.

Oborne & Heller cricketing partnership

Jointly, he and Peter produced White On Green, celebrating the drama of Pakistan cricket, including the true story of the team which lost a first-class match by an innings and 851 runs.

Peter and Richard have played cricket with and against each other for a variety of social sides, including Parliament’s team, the Lords and Commons, and in over twenty countries including India, Pakistan, the United States, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, France, Greece, Australia, Zimbabwe, New Zealand and Morocco.

The Podcast is produced by Bridget Osborne and James Willcocks at The Chiswick Calendar.

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

See also: Chiswick Calendar Blogs & Podcasts

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

What’s On for Children over Easter

Looking for ideas for what to do with children during the Easter holidays?

George IV Petting Zoo

The George IV is transforming its courtyard into a Petting Zoo on Easter Sunday (17 April), courtesy of the Vauxhall City Farm.

Children can handle rabbits, guinea pigs & goats. The pub also offers its regular Kids Table in the games room. The event is free but bound to be popular, so if you would like to eat it’s best to book a table. NB George IV offer 20% off all food and drink to holders of a Chiswick Calendar Club Card.

Book your table here.

Easter hunt at the Chiswick Cheese Market

Image above: Chiswick Cheese Market

It’s the Cheese Market on Sunday and they too have an Easter activity for children. Join the big hunt among the cheese stalls, with a prize for every completed entry.

Easter at Hen Corner

Image above: Easter at Hen Corner

Join Hen Corner in their Easter celebrations. Children explore the garden looking for signs of new life and celebrate… You will be welcomed with drinks and home-made treats then after your introductions it’s time to explore the garden, meet the chickens, hunt for eggs then get creative in the conservatory.

Activities may include:

  • Making your own Hot Cross Buns
  • Hunting for eggs (real and chocolate) in the garden
  • Easter craft activity
  • Hugging a hen

Tickets £20. There are tickets left for the morning of Monday 18 April. Sara offers Chiswick Calendar Club Card members a 10% discount. To take advantage of the discount, email her at Life@Hen Corner.com. Otherwise just book online on her website.

hencorner.com

Chiswick House Gardens, Bizzy Buddies holiday camps

Image above: Bizzy Buddies Easter camp at Chiswick House

Chiswick House Gardens has Bizzy Buddies Easter Camp, offering boys and girls aged 3 – 16 football, tennis, dodgeball and tag rugby as well as arts activities.

With lots of throwing, running, catching and jumping, Bizzy Buddies provide a fun-filled day of sporting activities.

Book tickets: class4kids.co.uk

Image above: Arts and Crafts Camp

The same group also offer an Arts and Crafts Camp for boys and girls aged 3 – 16, with painting, drawing, clay modelling and Easter themed crafts.

Book tickets: class4kids.co.uk

Dance workshop for children with Ballet4Life at the Riverside Studios

Image above: Ballet4Life Dance workshop for kids

Ballet4Life is running a dance workshop for children at Riverside Studios on Wednesday (13 April). They will deliver an enjoyable mix of Ballet, and Creative & Contemporary Dance, providing a fun and inspiring foundation for kids to explore movement and self-expression. This class is perfectly suited to 4-8 year old.

Discover animal homes in Richmond Park

Image above: Deer in Richmond Park

Friends of Richmond Park and Holly Lodge Education Centre is organising a drop in event at Richmond Park on Thursday (14 April) to teach children about animal homes in the park. Discover animal homes in Richmond Park.

This is a free event with lots of artefacts to discover. Children will be able to have a go at making their own nest, filled with a seasonal treat and then they will be able to go and discover more with Bingo card in hand.

Held from the green next to Broomfield Hill car park (entry only through Kingston Gate), anyone can drop in between 10.00 am and 12 noon.

Easter egg hunts at Osterley Park

Image above: Easter eggs at Osterley Park

Osterley Park has a nature trail for children to follow, with chocolate at the end. Thursday 14 – Monday 18 April, from 10am to 5pm. Make your way along the trail and find nature-inspired activities for the whole family. £3 per child – includes a trail map, pencil and a chocolate egg at the end. No need to book.

Redbeard’s holiday camps at Osterley Park

Image above: Redbeard’s holiday camps in Osterley Park

Osterley Park also hosts Redbeard’s holiday camps for children aged 5 – 11, which involve green woodworking, primitive fire lighting, woodland arts and crafts, tracking, foraging, natural cordage making, and den and shelter building.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Trail at Kew Gardens

Image above: Eric Carlyle’s Very Hungry Caterpillar

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Trail at Kew Gardens invites you to join The Very Hungry Caterpillar this Easter and follow an enchanting trail through the Gardens.

Embark on a transformational journey to becoming a beautiful butterfly, based on Eric Carle’s much-loved book, and wind through sculptures of juicy fruits and a cosy chrysalis along the way.

Easter egg hunt at Syon House

Image above: Syon Park Easter egg trail

Syon House is opening it’s doors on Good Friday, Easter Saturday, Easter Sunday and Easter Monday and they are hosting a range of Easter activities.

The activities planned are suitable for all ages. They start at 11.00 am, continuing to 5.00 pm and involve going on a hunt around Syon House and it’s gardens to find the trail of Easter eggs and toy chicks by using the clues that have been left behind.

Duck trail at the London Wetland Centre

Image above: Duck trail at the London Wetland Centre in Barnes

The London Wetland Centre in Barnes also has an Easter trail for children, who have to find a number of bright yellow ducks around the wetlands site.

London Wetland Centre is home to a wide variety of duck species, from the brightly coloured Mandarin to adorable whistling ducks. Ducks are particularly wonderful at this time of year with male ducks displaying their bright breeding feathers.

Tickets for the duck trail are free with a ticket to the site.

Book tickets: digitickets.co.uk

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Easter at Hen Corner – the chicks are hatching

See also: Beavers could be reintroduced to SW London

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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Easter at Hen Corner – the chicks are hatching

There’s nothing that says Easter quite like fluffy chicks hatching. It’s a big responsibility because it doesn’t always necessarily go to plan, but Sara Ward at Hen Corner in Brentford has this year committed to incubating her chickens’ eggs in her local church for all to see.

They are hatching now. She has published a video showing them pecking through the shells and struggling out of their confinement, and very cute they are too. They are to be found at St Paul’s Chutch, Brentford.

‘Chick Club’ is 10.00- 10.30  Tuesday and Wednesday morning (12 and 13 April) when you can go and see them and hear about how they are kept. Alternately you can take part in the Easter Sunday morning service at the church at 10.30am, where the chicks will be playing a leading role.

parishofbrentford.org.uk

A few places left to hug a hen on Easter Monday

Sara lives The Good Life, running a smallholding with her husband at an end of terrace house in Brentford, from which she runs courses in chicken and bee keeping, bread / sausage / cheese / fresh pasta and sundry other cookery courses. Hen Corner is a member of The Chiswick Calendar’s Club Card scheme.

Easter at Hen Corner is always popular, as children explore the garden looking for signs of new life.

You will be welcomed with drinks and home-made treats, then it’s time to explore the garden, meet the chickens, hunt for eggs then get creative in the conservatory. Activities may include making your own hot cross buns and Easter crafts. The session will end with a hot cross bun and you will be sure to have something to take home with you.

There are still some spaces left for Easter Monday, (18 April) in the morning from 10.30 – 12.30. Usual price is £20 per person for the session (all children must be accompanied by a paying adult).

Sara offers Chiswick Calendar Club Card members a 10% discount. To take advantage of the discount, email her at Life@Hen Corner.com. Otherwise just book online on her website.

hencorner.com

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Hear the People Sing – Concert to celebrate 150 years of St Paul’s Church, Grove Park

See also: Beavers could be reintroduced to SW London

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Chiswick’s new Vinyl shop opens Friday 15 April

Image above: ‘Vinyl bought and sold’ sign at Bookcase London

Underground Vinyl

Chiswick’s new Vinyl shop ‘Underground Vinyl’ is due to open this Friday (15 April) in the basement of the independent book shop Bookcase London at 268 Chiswick High Rd.

“We are so excited” Jessica Bloom told The Chiswick Calendar.

“It feels like a million years we’ve been doing this and we’re excited to show everyone what the hard work and disruption has been for.”

Image above: Bookcase London interior

Bookcase has emptied out its basement, put in a staircase and redecorated so Giulia Tonci Russo can open the record shop.

“There will be a bit of eveything” says Jessica, “classical, pop, R&B, ’60s, ’70s, predominently second hand.”

They had a surge of interest when The Chiswick Calendar first published the story they would be opening a Vinyl shop and were looking for second hand records. Every day since they’ve had a sign up in the shop they’ve had more people coming in.

Images above: Giulia Tonci Russo; Underground Vinyl bag

Giulia will be the day to day manager. Before this she has run an Italian magazine called ‘1977’:

‘Because it’s the most interesting year for cinema and music. That’s the year David Bowie brought out Heroes and Low, part of the Berlin trilogy. It’s the year Stevie Wonder won a Grammy [for Songs in the Key of Life] and Star Wars came out.’

She has a Masters in Music Business Management, from Westminster University. When the idea of the shop was first mooted, she told The Chiswick Calendar:

“I want to promote young independent labels and create a community around the shop where people meet and talk about music.”

Image: Listening booth at Vinyl Underground

Jessica has been posting in social media over the past few weeks that they were in the “vinyl countdown” to opening.

“We don’t have Easter by Patti Smith”, she says, “but we do have two singles by Eddie Rabbitt”.

Read more on this story on The Chiswick Calendar website

See also: Bookcase Chiswick on the look-out for second hand vinyls

See also: Rock & Rose opening in Chiswick High Rd Tuesday 19 April

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Andrea’s film review – Jimmy Savile: A British Horror Story

Jimmy Savile: A British Horror Story ⭐️⭐️½   Review by Andrea Carnevali

TV star Jimmy Savile charmed a nation with his eccentricity and philanthropy. But sexual abuse allegations eventually exposed a shocking unseen side of his persona. Available to watch on Netflix.

On a normal day (let alone a weekend) I would never have chosen to watch anything on Savile to be completely honest. Just the sight of the man alone creeps me out beyond belief.

But it just happens that I’m currently working on a TV series which is all about the moments in history when the BBC became the news, instead of broadcasting it, so I guess this two-part documentary (nearly three hours which I’ll never get back) however bleak and unwelcome, felt like homework that I had to do.

I’m finding it quite hard to talk about it because I know some of the people who worked behind the scenes (people who incidentally are all spectacularly talented), but mostly because I strongly believe it feels wrong to use such a national tragedy for what’s essentially just “Netflix entertainment”, without any real lessons to learn.

The series is of course handsomely crafted and meticulously researched, but to me the biggest problem was the actual concept of documentary itself and what it chose to focus on.

It’s clearly aimed at people outside the UK, possibly Americans, who have very little (if not zero) knowledge about Savile himself. But even with that in mind, I found very problematic how it spent the best part of the first two hours pretty much going through the honours and glories or the man, without hearing a single testimony from any of the victims.

In fact the first episode could almost be mistaken for one of those obituary pieces they usually release when a “standard” celebrity dies. Of course today we are watching it with the “privilege” (so to speak) of hindsight.

The knowledge of what we know, even if just the headlines, helped by gloomy music, horror-like sound effects and creepy freeze frames, film burns and other visual tricks, put us in a position to juxtapose the celebratory images we see on the screen. with the bleak reality.

Unfortunately much too often the documentary makes no effort to break that spell, to stop the charade and to shout “hold on a second, while this man is being so revered by everyone, he’s also abusing around 400 hundreds victims, some as young as five!”.

We all know that’s where we are heading, but unbelievably the revelations (the “horror” from the title) are relegated to the second half of the last episode.

Before we get there we have to sit through a slow succession of example after  example of how enraptured the nation was by this monster (all presented in a slightly confused chronology): his close friendship with Margaret Thatcher and Prince Charles, his many appearances with all possible celebrities from the Beatles to the Pope, his 40+ years on television from Jim’ll Fix it to Top of the Pops, to the countless guest appearances, as well as his charity work, his MBE and so on.

The film is full of repetitions and after a while one story of his successes looks much like the next one. I could have done with a quick five minute montage at the front to do all the work that the first two hours did.

In fact if you look at the trailer for the series, it does a great job at conveying all that in just a couple of minutes. That man doesn’t really deserve such detailed analysis of his work. Also, what about his life before his all that fame?

Once the revelations finally do come, the documentary feels rushed, avoiding any psychological analysis or any specifics, not so much on his crimes, but on how he was able to get away with it beyond the fact that he was basically too huge.

The documentary fails to answer crucial questions, like the BBC mishandling for a start, and to acknowledge the danger of the silence from all those people who suspected something, those who brushed it under the carpet and those who pretended they didn’t see anything.

This is an important story, but only if we use it to learn from it. Learning about Savile’s accolades is pretty pointless at this stage.

I think there is a more insightful and useful documentary to be made, not so much about Savile and his crimes, but about how we can prevent this shameful history to repeat itself again.

Andrea Carnevali is a Bafta winning film maker who lives in Chiswick.

Jimmy Savile: A British Horror Story is available to watch on Netflix.

See all Andrea’s film reviews here: Film reviews by Andrea Carnevali

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

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To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here 

Brentford 2 – 0 West Ham

Image above: Home are the heroes… and it’s hugs all round

This is getting to be a habit for the Bees. Thumping London rivals from the top six in the division, that is.

For the second consecutive weekend, highflyers were despatched comprehensively as Thomas Frank’s first-team pool of players snaffled three points to distance themselves further from the relegation zone lurking down below. Oh joy – no wonder the jubilant crowd at the Community Stadium on Saturday seemed so reluctant to go home.

West Ham, the team I supported in my youth, has thrived under the managership of David Moyes, even if the glory days of Bobby Moore, Martin Peters and Geoff Hurst are long gone. Today the Hammers are in sixth place in the Premier League and competing in Europe, with dreams of a Champions League place yet to fade and die.

But it’s a fickle old game, football, with many a hiccup on the way to success and equally so on the road to failure.

Image above:  Lap of honour and the place is jumping to Brentford’s winning anthem ‘Freed From Desire’

Witness from the kick-off on Saturday, when the mischievous Brentford faithful gave visiting centre-back Kurt Zouma a torrid time whenever he touched the ball. Zouma, you may recall, had made the national news bulletins when appearing to confuse a pet cat with a training football. What a catastrophe, one that Brentford’s wittier patrons were anxious to ensure was not forgotten.

When injury determined that after 29 minutes he had to be withdrawn from the fray to be replaced by Issa Diop, he might well have felt some relief to escape the taunts as well as frustration at possibly missing his club’s vital Europa League quarter-final clash with Lyon this week.

The Bees had the visitors on their collective back foot from the start. Brian Mbeumo unleashed a fizzer of a shot that was turned away by Lucasz Fabianski at full stretch – one of Bryan’s several might-have-been moments in the first half – and Christian Eriksen’s artful free kick lacked the venom to trouble the keeper.

Image above: Eriksen hypnotises the opposition

At the other end, David Raya was rarely exerted by a visiting attack in which hotshot Michail Antonio seemed out of sorts. But with Brentford’s chances lacking execution, the reward of League points remained no more than a promise.

That changed just three minutes after the interval, when the Old Firm of Mbeumo and Ivan Toney produced the goods that have been characteristic of their partnership in this first Premier season after years of trying. A throw-in that found Toney saw him provide a cultured flick for Mbeumo to run on to and rifle a low drive past Fabianski.

Image above: Ivan Toney meaks the break

Missing from the scoresheet for far too long, the Frenchman celebrated with a mixture of elation and relief. Much back-slapping from other team members was accompanied by Eriksen’s supportive demonstration of delight.

After 63 minutes the Old Firm proved it really was back in business when Rico Henry’s long, high cross was volleyed back into the goalmouth by Mbeumo and there was Toney to head powerfully home.

West Ham, with the volume of ‘Forever Blowing Bubbles’ increased encouragingly by their supporters, pulled up their socks and set out to rectify the situation. Said Benrahma, fondly remembered from his time at Brentford, was substituted for Manuel Lanzini to weave his magic (‘Said wants to come home’ sang the Bees’ crowd), but it wasn’t enough.

Eriksen’s dominance of the Brentford midfield, Kristoffer Ajer’s immaculate performance and stand-in skipper Christian Nørgaard’s authority throughout, plus a defence that grows in stature with every game – unwell captain Pontus Jansson’s absence was barely noticed by Frank’s revised jigsaw of a back four – stood out in a team oozing confidence as it saw off the Hammers for the second time in the season.

Image above: Flying high: The Bees’ skipper challenges Fornals in the air

Next up, Watford away from home, whose automatic promotion from the Championship has disappeared from sight, to be replaced by a real and present danger of relegation for the Hornets.

Unlike many of Chelsea’s snooty supporters the previous week, most West Ham fans stayed loyally until the bitter end of the match. Good for them, although their choral contribution of ‘Blowing Bubbles’ had achieved little.

‘The bubbles burst,’ said my mate Charlie.

Brentford: Raya; Ajer (substitute Roerslev 83), Zanka, Pinnock, Henry (sub Roerslev 83); Janelt, (sub Jensen 69), Ericksen, Nørgaard; Mbeumo (sub Canós 78); Toney, Wissa.

West Ham: Fabianski; Coufal, Dawson, Zouma (sub Diop 29), Cresswell; Soucek, Rice; Bowen, Luzini (sub Benrahma 57), Formals’; Antonio (sub Viasic 66).

Bill Hagerty is a contributing editor of the Bees United supporters’ group

Photographs Liz Vercoe.

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

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Mind Matters – Is therapy in mainstream drama and TV a good thing?

In the twenty years since I started in the therapy profession, the stigma around counselling and psychotherapy has significantly reduced and over the last few years it has become a routine part of everyday film and drama.

You would think that as a therapist I would welcome this move into mainstream culture but overall, when I reflect on what I’ve seen I am left thinking that all too often therapy remains misunderstood and depictions in mainstream media only serve to perpetuate unhelpful myths and stereotypes.

The confusion of terminology doesn’t help; for example there is counselling, therapy, psychotherapy, psychology, and psychiatry and the words used for someone who goes to therapy. ‘Client’ and ‘patient’ are the two words in common usage and personally I feel uncomfortable with both.

I prefer to trace back the word patient to its Latin origin, when patien was a word used for someone enduring suffering. For me therapy is a conversation between someone currently enduring suffering and someone experienced in how to better understand the suffering; because when we understand the origin of suffering the possibilities for change are revealed.

All too often the therapist is depicted as someone who is able to offer amazingly insightful and life changing analyses, suggesting they know their client / patient better than they know themselves. This is problematic because it suggests that if you are struggling, you give an account of your problem to a therapist who, like a doctor, will be able to give you specialist knowledge.

Image above: DI Steve Arnottt required to see a psychologist to keep his job in BBC’s Line of Duty; photograph BBC

The reality of therapy is borne out by research that shows when therapy finishes both the therapist and client will most often have different views of what the therapy was about and where and when change occurred. Therapists have differing ways of exploring suffering, but it is the insight or change or perspective that comes from the patien themselves which facilitates change.

Another depiction is that therapy is needed when people don’t talk about their feelings. True talking about feelings doesn’t always come easily for many people but ultimately it is our understanding of our feelings such that we are able to think clearly that is most important. Whether feelings are expressed is of far less importance than whether they are understood and acted upon skilfully.

I’m also often fascinated and often dismayed by the way therapists are portrayed, sometimes they turn out to be the villains, completely chaotic, unboundaried, or cold and aloof sitting sternly with a notebook and pen, whilst at other times they are egoistic and decisive advisors, but rarely do I see them portrayed as someone simply engrossed by their patiens suffering with compassion, patience, curiosity and concern.

In writing this reflection I realise that what concerns me most is that unrealistic depictions create expectations that are unhelpful. A felt sense of trusting, relaxed connection enables both patien and therapist as equals to work through the suffering and this cannot easily be achieved with unhelpful expectations.

If you have found this article interesting and would like me to critique specific depictions in film and tv drama, then please let me know.

Nicholas Rose
Psychotherapist, Counsellor, Couples Counsellor and Coach

UKCP registrant, MBACP (accred), UKRCP
PGDip, MA, Adv Dip Ex Psych

Nicholas Rose & Associates
Counselling, psychotherapy and coaching for children, adults, couples and families.

nicholas-rose.co.uk

Read more blogs by Nicholas Rose

Read the next in the series here – Mind Matters – Looking after the mental health of children and young people

Read the previous one – Mind Matters – Finding friendship in Chiswick

See all Nicholas’s Mind Matters blogs here

Read a profile of Nicholas here

Read more on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Staveley Road – Park Road permanent barrier completed

Images above: The completed Staveley Road/ Park Road modal filter; photograph Abundance London)

The controversial permanent barrier at junction between Staveley Road and Park Road has been completed, replacing the ugly plastic temporary barrier which itself had been a point of fierce contention amongst residents.

The completion of the modal filter (a measure that allows the passage of some modes of transport but not others) draws a line under the long and often fierce debate over whether the barrier should stay or be removed. Pedestrians can now diagonally cross at the road’s old junction and cyclists are able to cut through the barrier.

In 2020, two pedestrian islands were removed along Staveley Road and were replaced with a set of temporary traffic lights and a temporary pedestrian crossing. The changes were part of the wider ‘Low-traffic Neighbourhood’ schemes which have been introduced in various places across Chiswick.

Traffic planners at LB Hounslow council said the change was to stop motorists using Staveley Road as a rat-run from the A316 to and from the A4 and to lower pollution levels in the area as a whole.

Traffic surveys showed that 70% traffic through the residential area just drives straight through. Staveley Rd is a residential street which had high volumes of traffic and drivers also routinely sped down it.

The Council’s solution was to put a diagonal barrier across the Staveley Road junction with Park Road, which made it impossible to drive the whole length of either road.

Initially introduced as a trial, the Council said they would be ‘carefully monitoring’ the scheme to judge whether it had been a success. By forcing drivers to take a detour the route has ceased to be a shortcut and residents on Staveley Rd broadly agree the area is now a quieter place to live in.

Opinions still divided

Supporters of the scheme celebrated the completion on Twitter. One said:

“Every time I cycle this way I can’t help but reflect on how unsafe I used to feel, the dangerous close passes by speeding drivers, now it is so much safer. Thank you @LBofHounslow

TV Broadcaster, Chiswick resident and cycling enthusiast Jeremy Vine said:

“Wonderful this. Stopping literally thousands of cars cutting through. Property prices in these streets will jump.”

Some still see the barrier as an enduring mistake and continue to mistrust LB Hounslow’s official traffic figures, one Chiswick resident called Janice said:

“The fools at the LBH who designed this have no regard for the disruption they have caused. Traffic has just been displaced to run along the congested A316. Their figure of 6,000 cars going down Staveley Road is not backed up by reliable figures. They pluck figures out of the air”

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: May local elections – List of candidates for Hounslow published

See also: Cllr Joanna Biddolph apologises for abusing her position and leaking confidential security information

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

 

Political campaigning in Chiswick goes digital

Images above: Labour’s Hanif Khan and Conservatives’ Ron Mushiso campaigning in Chiswick Gunnersbury ward

Nothing will replace knocking on doors in all weathers as the mainstay of political campaigning. Showing your face as a candidate and being available to debate issues on the doorstep is essential to win hearts and minds in local elections.

Chiswick candidates have been doing that for weeks, but two have also embraced the digital age with videos.

Cllr Hanif Khan, a Cabinet member of Hounslow Council, responsible for guiding policy throughout the pandemic, is standing for the first time in Chiswick with two Labour colleagues in the newly redrawn and renamed Chiswick Gunnersbury ward, which until this election has been known as Turnham Green ward.

Here is his video pitch to voters:

Chiswick residents need a voice within the Council, says Labour

Cllr Hanif Khan’s message to voters is that Chiswick needs change. Referring to Labour’s current 50 seat majority on Hounslow Council he says:

“It’s been unfair that many residents have been left to fend for themselves and have not had a voice in the Council.”

Cllr Ron Mushiso, who has represented Turnham Green ward for the past four years, has answered with his own video for Brentford Today and TV Debate not Hate website:


Watch Cllr Ron Mushiso’s “A day in the life of canvassing”:

Chiswick’s markets coopted into Conservatives’ ‘vision’

“We as councillors are behind every single market, every single local driven initiative or any business that brings footfall to Chiswick” says Ron. “We’re fully behind the markets. We’ve said so in our manifesto and we’ve said so in our vision for Chiswick.”

That is good to hear. Ron and fellow councillor Ranjit Gill have been volunteer marshals at the Flower Market for months, but their colleague Cllr Joanna Biddolph has never been seen there, despite claims to be spearheading a Chiswick High Rd Task Force.

The Chiswick Flower Market was the idea of local resident Ollie Saunders. It was established by a group of local residents, including the editor of The Chiswick Calendar, with no political affiliation whatsoever and no input from local councillors.

It was backed from the very first by Leader of Hounslow Council Steve Curran, who enabled it to set up, and has brought more than 60,000 visitors to the High Rd in the time it has been open.

The two other Sunday markets which opened subsequently in Chiswick High Rd – the Antiques Market and the Chiswick Cheese Market were also set up independently of Chiswick’s councillors and have no political affiliation.

While the Antiques market is a purely commercial venture, the Cheese Market is entirely the work of local residents who run it voluntarily for the good of the community.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: May local elections – List of candidates for Hounslow published

See also: Cllr Hanif Khan selected to fight for Labour in Chiswick Gunnersbury

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Hounslow Conservatives publish local election manifesto

Image above: Hounslow’s 2022 Conservative candidates

Hounslow’s Conservative Party has published its manifesto for the upcoming local elections in May, presenting 50 pledges for ‘a cleaner, greener and better borough’.

The manifesto commits to ‘building quality homes instead of tower blocks, reversing Hounslow Labour’s policy of year-on-year Council Tax rises, reviewing controversial traffic schemes, and cleaning up the borough’s local politics to ensure the Council works for and listens to residents and local businesses’.

In Chiswick Gunnersbury, incumbent councillors Joanna Biddolph, Ranjit Gill and Ron Mushiso will be standing for reelection.

Candidates in Chiswick Homefields ward include local Tory activist Jack Emsley. Incumbent councillors Gerald McGregor and John Todd will be standing for reelection.

In Chiswick Riverside, incumbent councillor Gabriella Giles is standing for reelection, along with former Hounslow Conservative Group Leader Peter Thompson and Sebastian Wallace – co founder of a venture capitalist investment fund company. Sam Hearn, who has represented Chiswick Riverside for 16 years, is retiring.

Image above: (L) Conservative candidate Jack Emsley (right) canvassing with Cllr John Todd (second left) and Tory activists; (R) Cllrs Ranjit Gill and Joanna Biddolph canvassing in Chiswick on Sunday (10 April)

Conservatives promise to reverse Council Tax rises & review borough traffic schemes

All local Conservative candidates are making ten key commitments to residents. A Conservative led council pledges to:

  • ‘Reverse Hounslow Labour’s policy of year-on-year council tax rises and review its changes to the borough’s Council Tax Support Scheme
  • ‘Review the controversial low traffic neighbourhoods and work with TfL to revise and improve safer cycling infrastructure to ensure it works for the community
  • ‘Create a safer borough by increasing levels of streetlighting and the number of local police officers
  • ‘Clean-up local politics by reducing the number of councillors who receive ‘special responsibility allowances’ and review the council’s ‘strong leader’ structure
  • ‘Put residents at the heart of local decision making by increasing the number of public forums and making councillors more accountable by publishing real-time data on how much case work they complete and how many meetings they attend
  • ‘Improve the air we breathe by re-joining the London Air Quality Network and investing in better air quality monitoring to help us make informed policy decisions to tackle pollution levels
  • ‘Champion Hounslow’s riverside heritage by backing local rewilding projects, defending flood plains from inappropriate overdevelopment and keeping riverways clean and tidy
  • ‘Build quality homes for residents that are fit for growing families, instead, they say, ‘of Hounslow Labour’s continued focus on cramped tower blocks’
  • ‘Support marginalised groups by working with business groups, forums and local businesses to improve access to career growth opportunities and apprenticeships for members of disadvantaged communities
  • ‘Invest in the local economy by funding local markets and supporting retailers against crime and antisocial behaviour.’

“We need a council that puts residents first” says Conservative Group Leader

Councillor Gerald McGregor, Leader of the Conservative Group on Hounslow Council said:

“As our borough emerges from the past two years, we need a council that puts residents first and supports our community to make a clean, green recovery.

“After listening to residents from across the borough, we are excited to present our 50 pledges for a better Hounslow.

“From improving the air we breathe to reversing Hounslow Labour’s shameful policy of year-on-year Council Tax increases, we look forward to the opportunity to give residents the better borough that they deserve.”

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Ealing’s Liberal Democrats launch local election manifesto

See also: Cllr Joanna Biddolph apologises for abusing her position and leaking confidential security information

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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Hounslow Labour Party launch local election campaign

Image above: Hanif Khan campaigning in Chiswick Gunnersbury on Sunday (10 April)

Hounslow’s Labour Party have launched their election campaign in the run up to the local elections in May.

Launching their 62 candidates for election across Hounslow, the party said their policies will make for “a greener, cleaner, safer and thriving borough.”

Labour have fielded Hounslow’s Cabinet Member for Transport, Councillor Hanif Khan in Chiswick Gunnersbury. Hanif is joined by Uday Nagaraju and Emma Yates. They say the three candidates will mount a strong campaign that will make the Conservatives’ Chiswick heartlands competitive for Labour.

Former Deputy Mayor, community activist and leading Labour voice, Mukesh Malhotra, is leading the Labour charge in Chiswick Homefields, joined by solicitor Olivia Uwechue and Saroosh Khan.

Councillor Mel Collins, one of Hounslow’s longest-serving councillors, will be looking to make history as the first Labour representative in Chiswick Riverside this century. He will be supported in this by his fellow candidates Gurbachan Atwal and long-term Hounslow Resident Amy Croft.

Labour’s candidates offer ‘decades of experience’ 

Labour’s candidates, who, they say, ‘together bring decades of experience leading Hounslow Council’ will be standing on the following six key pledges:

  • A Greener Hounslow
    Hounslow Labour say they will plant 20,000 more trees, reduce carbon emissions by 50% and invest £5m to ensure our parks and open spaces remain among the best in London.
  • A Healthier Hounslow
    They have committed to improving the borough’s air quality by providing safe walking and cycling routes, developing their 15 minute neighbourhoods and rolling out more than 2,000 additional electrical vehicle charging points.
  • A Cleaner Hounslow
    They say they will reduce rates of fly tipping by at least 25% by introducing the Special Waste Service across the borough and investing £2m in pavement improvements.
  • A Thriving Hounslow
    Labour say they will introduce the ‘Hounslow Young Person Guarantee’ – a guarantee of support, education, training or employment for all the borough’s young people up to age 25.
  • A Safer Hounslow
    They have committed to creating safer neighbourhoods by investing over £15m in tackling anti-social behaviour on Hounslow’s streets and implementing an early intervention approach to reduce serious crime among young people.
  • A Liveable Hounslow
    They say they will build 1,000 council homes and buy 1,000 more social rent homes for the borough’s residents and invest £300m in improving the quality of the borough’s council estates.

Hounslow residents are “horrified by Boris Johnson’s incompetent and out of touch government”

All Labour candidates “stand on a proud record”, argue Hounslow Labour, citing the building of around 1,300 new council homes and 3,200 more affordable homes by May 2022 and investment of over £2m to fix potholes. They  have the best roads of any London borough according to the LOTAG State of the City survey 2020.

The candidates also point to their record on improved waste and recycling, with recycling rates increased from around 29% to over 35%.

On jobs, they have helped create 4,000 new apprenticeships and training opportunities; and “protected residents from Conservative austerity with no cuts to key services,”

They also say they have improved parks, leisure centres and libraries.

Cllr Salman Shaheen, candidate for Isleworth and Chair of Brentford & Isleworth Constituency Labour Party, said:

“The Labour Party is standing a full slate of candidates across Hounslow, giving every voter in the borough the chance to vote for a party that is working day in day out to build communities we can all be proud of, making our streets cleaner and safer, tackling the climate emergency head on, supporting jobs and local businesses, improving education, protecting vulnerable residents, and building thousands of council homes.

“Across the borough, we are hearing from residents who tell us they support our work locally and are horrified by Boris Johnson’s incompetent and out of touch government. On May 5, Hounslow’s people get the chance to show Johnson what they think.”

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Ealing’s Liberal Democrats launch local election manifesto

See also: Cllr Joanna Biddolph apologises for abusing her position and leaking confidential security information

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Hounslow Greens and Lib Dems announce electoral pact

The Green Party and the Liberal Democrats have announced that they have agreed a mini-electoral pact in the borough of Hounslow.

They are not fielding candidates against each other in two wards in the borough – Chiswick Gunnersbury and Brentford West. The Liberal Democrats have selected Helen Cross, Will Francis and Johanna Guppy to contest Chiswick Gunnersbury whereas Stephen Clark and Tony Firkins will contest the two seat Brentford West Ward.

Hounslow Green Party confirmed that Jon Elkon, Martin Bleach and Astrid Hilne will stand in Chiswick Homefields, and Bill Hagerty, Elanor Lewis-Holme and Andrea Black will stand in Chiswick Riverside.

The two parties came to the decision in the hope of ‘breaking the two-party monopoly’ in Hounslow. There currently are 50 councillors representing Labour on Hounslow Council and 10 representing the Conservatives.

Parties say electoral system is ‘deeply flawed’

A statement issued by the two parties says:

“The deeply flawed first past the post voting system used in the local elections in Hounslow favours the two largest political parties and penalises alternative parties, Hounslow Liberal Democrats and Hounslow Greens have agreed to stand aside in two wards in May’s local elections.

“Both parties believe that this is the best way to break through the two-party monopoly which first past the post inflicts on Hounslow. Both parties agree that Hounslow Council is less representative, and its decision-making is poorer, for not having the benefit of Liberal Democrat and Green voices in the Council Chamber.

“However, this agreement in Brentford and Chiswick does not imply support for each other’s policies locally or nationally.

“Both parties would like to thank all those who voted for them in the past in these wards and hope that their supporters in Gunnersbury and Brentford West will understand that the constraints of the electoral system have forced a difficult choice to get more diverse voices on Hounslow Council. Both parties will continue to fight hard to change the outdated electoral system.”

See also: May local elections – List of candidates for Hounslow published

See also: Political campaigning in Chiswick goes digital

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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May local elections – List of candidates for Hounslow published

Image above: sign to a polling station in Chiswick

The full list of candidates for the upcoming 2022 local elections in the London Borough of Hounslow has been published.

On 5 May, voters will have the opportunity to choose their representatives for the next four years. In LB Hounslow, a total of 172 candidates will be battling it out for 62 seats across 22 wards. This is a change from the last election where there were 60 seats available in 20 wards.

The Labour Party is putting forward 62 candidates, while the Conservative Party is offering up 61 candidates. There are also 26 Green candidates and 20 Liberal Democrats standing for office. Riverside Conservative councillor Sam Hearn, who was reelected for a fourth term in 2018, is retiring from representing Chiswick this year.

Streetspace measures put to the test

The election will be the first major test of pubic opinion in Chiswick since the Labour-run council implemented various controversial Streetspace schemes, Cycleway 9 and Low-Traffic Neighbourhood schemes, which has polarised residents.

Hounslow has been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, with many job losses resulting from the drop in traffic through nearby Heathrow Airport. The effectiveness of LB Hounslow’s pandemic recovery schemes and its general leadership during the pandemic will likely be scrutinised by voters across the borough.

Labour think they have a chance in Chiswick

Currently there are 50 councillors who were elected representing the Labour Party and 10 Conservatives. National polling and voting patterns at the time of the Mayoral elections May local elections – List of candidates for Hounslow published increase the proportion of seats it holds. All nine seats in Chiswick are held by Conservatives.

In Chiswick 52% population voted for Labour Mayor Sadiq Khan in the London wide elections last year.

READ ALSO: Chiswick voted for Sadiq Khan in the Mayoral elections

Image above: redrawn map of Hounslow’s wards in 2022

Green – Lib Dem pact

The Green Party and the Liberal Democrats are not fielding candidates against each other in two wards in the borough – Chiswick Gunnersbury and Brentford West, in the hopes of strengthening their chances to get their candidates elected.

List of candidates

The list of candidates for Chiswick is as follows:

Chiswick Gunnersbury Ward: Joanna Biddolph (Con); Helen Cross (Lib Dem); Will Francis (Lib Dem); Ranjit Gill (Con); Johanna Guppy (Lib Dem); Hanif Khan (Lab); Ron Mushiso (Con); Uday Nagaraju (Lab); Emma Yates (Lab)

Chiswick Homefields Ward: Martin Bleach (Green); James Charrington (Lib Dem); Mark Cripps (Lib Dem); Leigh Edwards (Lib Dem); Jonathan Elkon (Green); Jack Emsley (Con); Astrid Hilne (Green); Saroosh Khan (Lab); Mukesh Malhotra (Lab); Gerald McGregor (Con); John Todd (Con); Olivia Uwechue (Lab)

Chiswick Riverside Ward: Gurbachan Athwal (Lab); Andrea Black (Green); Melvin Collins (Lab); Amy Croft (Lab); Guy de Boursac (Lib Dem); Gabriella Giles (Con); Bill Hagerty (Green); Elly Lewis-Holmes (Green); Charles Rees (Lib Dem); Peter Thompson (Con); Sebastian Wallace (Con).

For the full list of candidates for the whole of Hounslow, see here: hounslow.gov.uk/info

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Cllr Joanna Biddolph apologises for abusing her position and leaking confidential security information

See also: LB Hounslow makes it into Private Eye’s ‘Rotten Boroughs’ column

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

Four-car collision on A4 near Sutton Court Road

Image above: Police at the site of the collision on the A4 – from TfL

There were traffic jams across Chiswick on Saturday (9 April) after several cars collided on the A4 near Sutton Court Road.

Four cars were involved in the pile-up which occurred at around 5pm on the westbound lane opposite the Porsche garage. One of the cars involved turned on its roof and caught fire. The police said the two people who were in the car are believed to have left on foot.

One woman involved in the crash was taken to hospital, but has since been discharged. Reportedly at least one person had to be cut out of their car by firefighters.

The A4 was strewn with debris and remained closed for several hours afterwards.

Collisions often take place in the area which has been described as an accident ‘blackspot’.

No arrests were made following the incident.

Any witnesses or drivers with dashcam footage of the collision are asked to call police on 101 or tweet @MetCC quoting CAD 4836/09APR.

Image above: emergency services at the scene – credit: Fintan Coyle

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Escaped falcon spotted around south west London

See also: Ealing’s Liberal Democrats launch local election manifesto

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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West London Queer Project attend protest in support of transgender rights

Image above: trans rights protestors outside Downing Street on Saturday (from the WLQP’s Instagram)

Members of the West London Queer Project (WLQP) joined hundreds of people protesting outside Downing Street on Saturday (9 April), in response to the exclusion of transgender people from the proposed ban on conversion therapy.

Founded by Aubrey Crawley in 2021, in response to the dearth of LGBTQ+ venues and events in west London, the WLQP hosts a weekly ‘Sunday Social’ in The George IV pub in Chiswick. Their events have become popular among west London’s LGBTQ+ community.

Attendees waved placards with ‘No Ban Without Trans’ written in the pink, white and blue colours of the transgender flag and were joined by celebrity drag performers Ella Vaday and Jujubee.

Debates around transgender rights have been simmering for several years. Recently, the issue has made headlines and has become a contentious topic of public debate.

The main divisions are between civil-rights activists, who view gender a social construct and propose a ‘self-identification’ system for one’s gender, and so-called ‘gender critical’ activists who believe that someone’s sex, whether they are male or female, is biological and cannot be changed merely by the decision to identify differently.

In response to the ongoing, often toxic, debate, several professional bodies and support groups claimed last week that the mental health of the UK’s transgender community is ‘at crisis point’.

Anti-abuse charity Galop told The Guardian their helpline has been receiving calls from trans people who “feel exhausted and dispirited by their exclusion from the government’s proposed conversion therapy ban, and the surrounding conversation on social media and in the news”.

Conversion therapy is based on an assumption that being lesbian, gay, bi or transgender is a mental illness that can be ‘cured’. All psychological and medical bodies in the UK – including the Royal College of Psychiatrists and the British Medical Association – are united in the view that the practice is unethical, potentially harmful and not supported by evidence.

Images above: Founder & organiser Aubrey Crawley (centre left) poses with drag performer Ella Vaday (left) and WLQP members, Saturday’s protest outside Downing Street (pictures taken from the WLQP’s Instagram)

‘There is no ban without the T’ says WLQP founder

The WLQP attended Saturday’s protest to “support our transgender siblings” against ongoing marginalisation in public life and to show their solidarity in the face of a rising tide of transphobic abuse.

Speaking after the protest, founder & organiser Aubrey Crawley told The Chiswick Calendar:

“We attended to show our support for transgender people, who’s right to be safe from torture in their own country, has been purposefully denied to them at the same time that new laws have been introduced to protect lesbian, gay and bisexual people.

“We view that as illogical and grossly unfair as we stand together as one community, we are all LQBTQ+ and we don’t accept that our government affords us more rights than our trans brothers and sisters.

“We showed up in numbers, as one, to challenge Boris Johnson to rethink a grave error of judgment, which we believe has been made in ignorance. There is no ban without the T, from our perspective.”

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Suspected drug dealer arrested in Chiswick, car seized

See also: Four-car collision on A4 near Sutton Court Road

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

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Andrea’s film review – Apollo 10 ½: A Space Age Childhood

Apollo 10 ½: A Space Age Childhood ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review by Andrea Carnevali

A coming-of-age story set in the suburbs of Houston, Texas in the summer of 1969, centred around the historic Apollo 11 moon landing. Available to watch on Netflix.

Richard Linklater, director of Boyhood and the Sunset trilogy of films has created a nostalgia-soaked collection of random intimate and heartfelt memories of his childhood (he calls this film “embarrassingly autobiographical”). They barely hold together as a narrative piece, but somehow they perfectly evoke the spirit of the American suburbs of the late ’60s.

Whether you lived through that period or not and whether you are American or not, the film has enough pop culture references to not just feel familiar, but also to charm the pants off anyone!

Mentions of TV series, films, food, adverts, board games cram the film often in an intentionally listy way, all to create a charming time capsule of a bygone era, when things seemed simpler, especially when seen through the eyes of a teenager. With hindsight it’s a miracles some of us are still alive, unprotected as we were from any health and safety regulations (Linklater likes to poke fun at that).

The soundtrack alone has more songs than a whole Juke-box in a diner, with too many titles to mention, from the likes of Creedence Clearwater Revival, Johnny Cash and Pink Floyd (and many many others).

The rather obscure and silly title was a slight turn off for me, but the film uses a teenager’s obsession with rockets, space as well as the moon-landing of 1969 as a framing device to actually focus on what’s happening here on Earth and tell a beautiful coming-of-age story.

The rotoscope-style animation, in which sequences are filmed and then re-drawn over it, might take a moment to get use to, but it gives the film a warm dreamy quality that perfectly matches the mood and the feel of the time.

In addition to that, the light-hearted narration by Jack Black, remembering his childhood, infuses everything with a sense of realism which at times makes it feel almost like a documentary. This might well be an animated film, but don’t think for a moment it is one for children. In fact it’ll play best to those who WERE children back then.

It’s meandering, at times all over the place and the lack of a proper story might be hard for some to swallow, but if you’re willing to let yourself go, you might just lose yourself in it and find little unexpected gems. It might just warm your soul just like it did to me.

Thank you Netflix.

Andrea Carnevali is a Bafta winning film maker who lives in Chiswick.

Apollo 10 ½: A Space Age Childhood is available to watch on Netflix.

See all Andrea’s film reviews here: Film reviews by Andrea Carnevali

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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Suspected drug dealer arrested in Chiswick, car seized

Image above: Hounslow Police seize the suspected drug dealer’s car 

Police have arrested and seized the vehicle of a man suspected of dealing Class A and Class B drugs.

He was detained during a stop and search operation by Hounslow’s borough policing team.

When his details were checked during the stop and search, it was found that his car was uninsured. A tow truck was called and his vehicle was taken away.

The police posted the image of the seizure in the early hours of Thursday morning (7 April)

Officers point out that you can report drug dealing anonymously on Twitter to @CrimestoppersUK.

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Chiswick High Road to be partially closed for one day

See also: Pop-up donation point this weekend for laptops for Ukrainian refugees 

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

The Chiswick Calendar CIC is a community resource. Please support us by buying us the equivalent of a monthly cup of coffee (or more, if you insist). Click here to support us.

We publish a weekly newsletter and update the website with local news and information daily. We are editorially independent.

To subscribe to the weekly newsletter, go here.

 

Andrea’s film review – Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwal

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald ⭐️⭐️ Review by Andrea Carnevali

The second instalment of the “Fantastic Beasts” series featuring the adventures of Magizoologist Newt Scamander. Available to watch on Netflix.

Well, if you’ve read my previous review of what I thought of the first film you might be able to skip this one, because everything I said before sadly gets confirmed for Fantastic Beasts Part 2.

It seems J.K. Rowling has learnt nothing from the shortcomings of her previous film, but crucially she seems to have forgotten what made the Potter Series so special. I’m afraid she really must take most of the blame for this muddled mess of a film.

The plot of this film is so convoluted that at some point I just gave up and stopped asking “Who?” What?” “How?” and let the film wash over me.

What’s so frustrating is that there is so much potential here. There are indeed still some faint glimmers of that warmth and inventiveness from the original Harry Potter magic, but on the whole they are mostly eclipsed by everything that was wrong in the first one, to which I had given the benefit of the doubt, and which is by now amplified if not doubled.

We start off with one of the most confusing chase sequences I’ve seen in the last few years and then proceed to introduce characters over characters across a series of countless meandering subplots which not only lacked charm, suspense, mystery and humour but left me completely cold and actually a bit bored too.

For full disclosure, I actually watched an extended version with seven extra minutes, none of which added anything to the previous (and already too long) cut.

Just like in the first one, Eddie Redmayne’s Newt is pretty much relegated to a side show. His character still remains a mystery to me, not so much in terms of plot, but mostly in terms of why should I care about him?

Meanwhile the best people from Part 1, Queenie Goldstein and Jacob Kowalski are now completely wasted.

Johnny Depp, in what turned out to be his last Hollywood blockbuster (he has been recast for the next film by Mads Mikkelsen), is essentially playing Voldemort 2.0, with pretty much the same evil plan in mind (to rally as many followers as possible), but does a good job at being creepy despite the very few scenes he’s in.

Jude Law also does the best with the little material he’s given, though on a very superficial level I was annoyed by the fact that he’s wearing normal clothes and not wizard robes (as you can see I had time to let my mind wonder about these pointless details).

My heart skipped a beat or two the moment we were back in Hogwarts again for some of the best moments in the film, but those few fleeting scenes only served to reminded me how much happier I was there.

This franchise is sinking lower and lower and they’re going to have to make some real magic to un-dig it from the pit of boredom and make me excited again about the next three sequels!!

Andrea Carnevali is a Bafta winning film maker who lives in Chiswick.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald is available to watch on Netflix.

See all Andrea’s film reviews here: Film reviews by Andrea Carnevali

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

Support The Chiswick Calendar

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Chiswick Auctions Islamic and Indian Art auctions Friday 29 April 2022

Chiswick Auctions is holding two auctions of Islamic and Indian Art on Friday 29 April. The first, at 11am, is a collection of mainly Iranian art works from an individual collector who died recently. The second, at 1pm, includes items from two single owner collections, one of a Lebanese businessman with eclectic taste, the other mainly manuscripts of Islamic art being offered at auction for the first time.

Beatrice Campi, Head of the Islamic and Indian art department at Chiswick Auctions, spoke to The Chiswick Calendar about the auctions and what to look out for.

Islamic Art – Property of a European Collector Part III, at 11am

Of the 111 lots Beatrice picked out a painting of a Persian domestic scene circa 1789, an oil on canvas depicting a famous love tale and a set of four very pretty bowls which represent a power struggle in a long ago dynasty.

Image above: Lot 21, an interior scene with a couple drinking wine, circa 1789

An interior scene with a couple drinking wine, circa 1789

Lot 21 is one of very few Iranian paintings which are both signed and dated, inscribed ‘Raqam-i Kamtarin Muhammad Ibn Khodadad 1204 AH’ (1789 AD). A point of difference from Western art, Beatrice explained, is that in Islamic art the craftsmen did not seek individual recognition, merely to emulate God.

This painting is from a time when Persia was going through massive turmoil. 1722 – 1794 was a time when regional powers were vying for precedence, seeking to take the imperial crown, but none of them were strong enough. The Zand dynasty sought to bolster their prestige by luring artists from the previous Safavid dynasty to their court. This artist, Muhammad Ibn Khodadad, was one of the greatest of the time.

The focus of the picture is on the woman seated. “She is literally wearing the trousers” says Beatrice, as the man and the servant hover behind her trying to please her. She is clearly having wine, not permitted by Islamic law but an indication of what household life was actually like behind closed doors.

She is wearing “a provocative diaphanous shirt showcasing her rounded breast and tattoos on her tummy and belly button, her gaze directed at the audience”, relaxed and confident. Estimate £600 – £800.

Image above: Lot 49, Layla and Majnun, attributed to Muhammad Zaman III

The love story of Layla and Majnun

Lot 49 is a painting which tells the tale of Layla and Majnun, a famous Persian love fable based on an Arabic folk tale which became popular in the 12th century and is still told to children today. The great poet Nizami Ganjavi wrote the Khamsa – a quintet of five works supposed to be read together. The tale of Layla and Majnun is one of these.

The two were born in the Arabian desert, grew up with each other and fell in love but were destined not to marry. When Layla is betrothed to another man Majnun is so distraught his name has gone into the Persian language as synonymous with ‘crazy’ or ‘bewildered’. The willow tree depicted is also synonymous with grief, as it is watered by his tears.

He leaves home and becomes feral, living in the forest where his sole companions are the animals. He becomes a hermit and stops speaking. Layla goes after him to tell him to come back and fight for her but she does not see an opportunity for the situation to change. The story ends tragically.

“It’s a bit like an Aesop’s fable” Beatrice tells me. “The moral of the tale is that you should fight for what you want but you might not always get it. “Persian tales aren’t like European ones. They are not unrealistically romantic like Cinderella where it all works out in the end, they are more realistic.”

The work is attributed to Muhammad Zaman III (active 1758 – 94). Estimate £6,000 – £8,000.

Image above: Lot 75, four porcelain bowls and saucers, commissioned by the Governor of Isfahan

A dynastic struggle in porcelain

Lot 75, four porcelain bowls and saucers, are not any old bits of china; they represent a dynastic struggle. Mas’ud Mirza was the eldest son of Nasser-al-Din Shah and a Persian prince of the Qajar dynasty, but as his mother was a commoner his father’s crown passed to his younger brother.

By way of compensation the Shah made him Governor of Isfahan province, where he ruled for over 35 years. Incensed by being passed over, he made it his business to build up Isfahan as one of the richest regions of Persia, growing a rival empire within an empire.

He commissioned these bowls from the same kiln in China his father used but commissioned bowls that were bigger than his father’s with a golden roundel with his full name on “to show the world he was stronger, better, richer and more lavish than his father” says Beatrice. The definition of one upmanship in porcelain.

Image above: Detail from one of the porcelain bowls

The decoration is typical Guangdong famille rose; the interior of the bowls embellished with bright polychrome colours and lobed medallions filled with Chinese interior scenes with figures alternating with floral blooms, birds, butterflies and fruits. Estimate £6,000 – £8,000.

Indian and Islamic Art, at 1pm

From the two collections by single owners included in the sale, Beatrice picked out an almost life sized statue of a Buddha, a small Kufic bifolio from the Qur’an and an Iznik dish from a kiln in Ottoman Turkey.

Image above: Lot 205, large gilt bronze Buddha

Large gilt bronze standing figure of the historical Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama Shakyamuni

Lot 205 is a figure of Buddha from Ayutthaya, Thailand from the mid 14th – mid 15th centuries. It belonged to the late Jean-Pierre Yonan, a Lebanese businessman. The impressive size, accurate details, and fineness of this statue are what make it interesting, says Beatrice. It stands at 136 cms high, excluding the base; 184 cms including the base.

It belongs to one of the earliest phases of the gilt bronze U-Thong style. The year 1431 marks a very important victory for the Thai people over the Khmer rulers, which is celebrated as the Siege or Fall of Angkor, a seven-month-long siege on the Khmer capital of Angkor by the Kingdom of Ayutthaya.

With the rise of a new capital in 1350, Ayutthaya (Central Thailand), the Thai kingdom was fully formed and ready to be the dominant power in the region until 1767. This shift in socio-political powers was deeply felt in the arts too, where considerable changes were introduced. Estimate £8,00 – £12,000.

Image above: Lot 454, a small sized Kufic Qur’an bifolio

A small sized Kufic Qur’an bifolio from the Near East or North Africa

Lot 454 is a small sized Kufic Qur’an bifolio on parchment from the 9th – 10th century. The Kūfic style of calligraphy is the earliest extant Islamic style of handwritten alphabet that was used by early Muslims to record the Qurʾān. Angular and dignified, it was also used on tombstones, coins and inscriptions on buildings.

On close examination you can see little red dots on the parchment which, says Beatrice, are diacritic marks, to indicate a particular pronunciation of the words to aid understanding.

“Arabic was written only using consonants. No vowels appeared, which meant the Qur’an was very much open to interpretation. If you saw b_d in English it could be bid, bed, bud or bad, so the diacritical marks are the vetting by the scholars to try and institutionalise the text.”

Each folio is only 8 x 12 cms. Why so small? Maybe the size indicates it was privately owned, or maybe it was so small because parchment was expensive. Paper was not introduced until the 11th century. Estimate £2,000 – £4,000.

Image above: Lot 314, late 16th century Iznik dish from Ottoman Turkey

A late 16th century Iznik dish from Ottoman Turkey

Lot 314 is a “quintessential” Iznik dish, says Beatrice, from the royal atelier for the Ottoman empire. Production at this kiln started in the late 1400s. Ceramics from that period were blue and white, but from 1550 onward the distinctive Armenian red bole is introduced.

“We don’t know how they started to use it on pottery” says Beatrice, “as it was a paste that physicians used for cicatrising wounds. It’s a red clay which heals by aiding scar formation.”

In this beautiful dish it is used to colour the carnations, plum blossom and some of the tulips. Estimate £3,000 – £4,000.

Images above: Large 10th – 12th century bronze figures of a bird from Khorsan, Eastern Iran; Small 12th – 13th century Seljuk bronze figure of a partridge from Khorsan, Eastern Iran also in the auction

Beatrice Campi is the Head of the Islamic and Indian art department at Chiswick Auctions.

If you would like to contact Beatrice, email her at beatrice.campi@chiswickauctions.co.uk

Chiswick Auctions
1 Colville Road
London, W3 8BL
0208 992 4442

chiswickauctions.co.uk

This page is paid for by Chiswick Auctions

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Tracey Emin among prominent women artists in Chiswick Auctions Urban & Contemporary Art sale

See also: About Chiswick Auctions

See also: Profile of Leigh Osborne – Owner of Chiswick Auctions

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Andrea’s film review – Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review by Andrea Carnevali

The adventures of writer Newt Scamander in New York’s secret community of witches and wizards seventy years before Harry Potter reads his book in school. 

With the third instalment only days away, I had sudden realisation that not only I could not remember a single frame of the first film, but I have never actually seen the second either.

And so the decision to devote the next five hours of my life to catching up with the franchise (dragging the poor unsuspecting family along for the ride too) came quite naturally.

Before I start, I should probably state my credentials. I have read all the Harry Potter books (some of them multiple times) I’ve seen all the films (both on the big screen and on TV), I saw the play in West End, I’ve built all the possible Harry Potter LEGO sets, I have the T-shirts (literally… in fact more than one), I can pretty much kick anyone’s butt playing all the various Wizarding Trivia Games out there and now I am raising a son who is beginning to know more than I do (except that he only got as far as book five and film four, so I’m still winning).

All this to say that, on paper at least, I’m what could be described as the perfect target audience for this. And yet, the film somehow had managed to completely alienate me and made me turn away from the rest of the franchise.

Watching again it today (well, I say “again” but it was pretty much like I’d never seen it before), I was able to appreciate it a bit more and possibly see why this doesn’t work as well as some of the other stories from J.K. Rowling.

As well as producing the film, Rowling is also writing the screenplay here (though she’s sharing writing credits with Steve Kloves an expert in the Potter world). One begins to wonder (well at least I do), whether she’s got a little bit too much power. It’s no secret that the later HP books, the ones she wrote when she was already a massive success, needed some serious editing. Clearly at that stage nobody dared to tell her anything. It seems something similar is going on here.

Novel writing and screenwriting obviously require two different skill sets, and it feels to me Rowling hasn’t fully cracked the latter yet.

You can take your time with things in a 600+ page novel to flesh out your characters, but in a script you have to do it economically and you’ve got to move quickly.

Her script has potentially good stuff in it, but it really needed a much more ruthless edit.

For a start the film is actually a bit confusing. I mean, I’ve seen it twice now and there are moments where I still wonder who wants what and why.

The story is over-stuffed with too many characters, most of whom are just there because of the four more films we’ve been promised after this. A lot of them are paper-thin, sketchy and next-to-irrelevant. We really could not care less whether they lived or died.

Eddie Redmayne for example may be a good actor in other films, but his Newt in this story is just not very interesting. He’s weird, quiet (actually too quiet! I really needed subtitles to get through some of the mumbling), a bit goofy, an animal-lover who wants to keep as many beasts as possible and to take care of them. That’s all we know about him at the start of the film… and that’s all we know at the end.

The Potter novels are mostly a coming-of-age story in a fantastical world, populated by three-dimensional characters so-well rounded often it’s often hard to pick one over the other as your favourite (or even most hateful).

Here there’s pretty much no story arc for anyone, except probably for Jacob Kowalski  (Dan Fogler) who really becomes the audience surrogate through which we learn about the wonders of the wizarding world.

Newt is instead a slippery sort of character, with no backstory, no love interest, no surprises. His total lack of any other distinguishing qualities makes it hard for us to fall in love with him and actually makes him the wrong person to focus this story on. In fact he’s barely present in it, possibly because of the millions of other characters.

But aside from the confusing plot, clunky transitions, over-long sequences and dull characters, the depiction of both New York City during the Roaring Twenties and the magical world is actually beautifully done.

The production design crams so many elements and details within every frame that at times it‘s almost overwhelming, especially once you add all the CGI (though I have to say, some that wasn’t that good).

All this will probably look amazing on a theme park ride, but in this film… Mmmm…. not so much.

I just felt it failed to tap into what made Harry Potter, with its Hogwarts, Diagon Alley, Gringotts, Quidditch, etc, etc, so enduring and magical.

There’s no doubt that J.K. Rowling is one of the best modern writers alive.

She is responsible for single-handedly bringing children back to reading and then somehow she was also able to draw in the adults as well, by creating a series that was not just fun, moving, wondrous and magical, but also perceptive, clever, with subversive wit and a profound understanding of the human condition.

All of which makes the failings of this film feel even bigger.

I’m probably been too harsh (and apparently I have to save some of the bitterness for its sequels), after all Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them has got magic, adventure, comedy, lots of CGI and everything audiences want from a fantasy family film, so even if you may get lost in it, you’ll find enough to enjoy.

Andrea Carnevali is a Bafta winning film maker who lives in Chiswick.

Fantastic Beasts and where to find them is available to watch on Netflix.

See all Andrea’s film reviews here: Film reviews by Andrea Carnevali

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Chiswick High Road to be partially closed for one day

Image above: Stamford Bus Garage

Temporary closure of the access to Stamford Brook Garage and Chiswick High Road within 20m either side of the garage

Chiswick High Road is to be partially closed this month as part of ongoing construction works on the cycle lane.

Hounslow Highways are looking to undertake resurfacing works to the revised Cycleway 9 scheme. The works will take place at the access to Stamford brook Garage and the road immediately outside it, on Sunday 10 April between the hours of 10.00am and 8.00pm.

The works will result in a temporary closure of the access to the bus garage and a lane closure of Chiswick High Road – 20 metres either side of the garage during the period of works.

Image above: entrance to Stamford Bus Garage as seen from Chiswick High Road (Google Maps)

LB Hounslow has notified Chiswick residents by post about the closure and has apologised for any inconvenience the works may cause.

The letter states the construction start date may be subject to change for ‘operational reasons’. LB Hounslow said they would do their utmost to ensure works are completed on time, and that any changes to the construction dates are communicated to residents ‘in good time’.

Concluding the letter, LB Hounslow said:

‘Throughout construction, we will aim to minimise disruption to residents, businesses, and other road users during these works, though it will be necessary to close roads and footways, restrict parking and use temporary traffic signals at times’

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Cllr Joanna Biddolph apologises for abusing her position and leaking confidential security information

See also: Ealing’s Liberal Democrats launch local election manifesto

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Pop-up donation point this weekend for laptops for Ukrainian refugees  

Image above: Cllr Ron Mushisho (left) & Jack Emsley (right) at Rocks Lane Chiswick

Organisers of the ongoing local laptop donation drive to support Ukrainian refugees will be running a special pop-up donation point this Saturday (9 April) between 12.00pm and 4.00pm at Christ Church, Turnham Green.

Chiswick residents have already donated a large number of devices at the ongoing donation point at Rocks Lane Sports Centre. with this pop-up collection. People are encouraged to bring second-hand laptops, tablets, mobile phones or other tech devices which refugees can use to connect with family and friends, as well as their new community.

All devices donated at Rock Lane Sports Centre or the pop-up collection point at Christ Church will be professionally wiped clean and reloaded with updated software thanks to Veritas Digital Services before being donated to community groups supporting Ukrainian refugees or, in certain local cases, donated directly to refugees who are in Chiswick as part of the Government’s Homes for Ukraine scheme.

The initiative is part of an ongoing effort to support Ukrainian refugees by local activists in Chiswick and Brentford alongside Laptops4Learning, the same team which organised over 500 second-hand laptops and other devices to be donated to schoolchildren across the borough the bridge the digital-divide during the Covid-19 pandemic. The collection in Chiswick is organised by Conservative local election candidates Ron Mushiso and Jack Emsley.

Generosity of Chiswick community ‘on full display’

Jack, who is standing for May’s council elections in Chiswick Homefields ward, said :

“Our donation drive to support Ukrainian refugees only began a fortnight ago, but we’ve already seen a huge number of residents and local businesses donate tech and second-hand laptops to our collection point at Rocks Lane,” said

“We’re excited to be able to offer a second pop-up donation point this Saturday at Christ Church between 12pm and 4pm to give residents another opportunity to support Ukrainian refugees who are settling here in South West London. I know that the generosity of the local community here in Chiswick will once again be on full display on Saturday as Chiswick residents continue to step-up to support refugees coming to the UK.”

Ron Mushiso, standing for re-election in Chiswick Gunnersbury ward said:

“Thanks to Laptops4Learning and the generosity of our local Chiswick community, we’ve already been able to help hundreds of students in Hounslow with spare tech, and now we’re well on our way to matching that generosity to support Ukrainian refugees coming to our borough,”

“A special thanks also to Christ Church, which has been a fantastic supporter of both donation drives, and is a real champion of good community initiatives like this. Saturday is a great opportunity for our amazing community to once again come together and support those most in need.”

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Cllr Joanna Biddolph apologises for abusing her position and leaking confidential security information

See also: Ealing’s Liberal Democrats launch local election manifesto

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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Chiswick Lifeboat rescues family of goslings

Images above: a Chiswick Lifeboat crew, a rescued gosling

Chiswick Lifeboat volunteer Holly Walters was out on a crew exercise on the River Thames on Friday (25 March) when she noticed a baby bird waddling across the deck of a Port of London Authority barge near Putney. On closer inspection, Holly found three other goslings were trapped in the vessel’s cargo, cheeping, with no safe route out or help from their parents.

With no mother goose in sight, Holly alerted the crew of a Port London Authority boat nearby, who said they would keep an eye on the goslings, and contacted the Swan Sanctuary charity in south west London to request their support. The following day, at noon, the RNLI volunteer teamed up with Chiswick crew member Tim Hallac and a vet from the Swan Sanctuary and came back to free the trapped goslings.

During the operation, the goslings scattered around the cargo, finding the most uncommon corners and hiding places to stay away from those who came to their rescue. Finally, after half an hour, the vet carefully collected the tiny geese in a box and transported them to the Swan Sanctuary for a check up. Because their parents had abandoned them, the Swan Sanctuary put the goslings in their crèche in Shepperton, where they will stay with other baby birds until they are old enough to be placed on a lake.

Above: a video of the goslings trapped on the barge

Goslings ‘would not have survived’ had they not been rescued

Holly Walters, Chiswick RNLI lifeboat volunteer crew member, said:

“It is testament to the caring nature of the volunteers of Chiswick Crew and others that we managed to help these lovely little fellas. When there is great coordination amongst organisations seeking to protect our river and all those creatures (big and small) that live and thrive on it, wonderful things can be achieved!”

Tim Hallac, Chiswick RNLI lifeboat volunteer crew member, said:

‘As soon as I found out about the abandoned tykes, the least I could do was to help Holly and Sally from The Swan Sanctuary get safely to them. After a little reluctance on their part, the animals were helped off the barge and into the caring hands of people who will make sure they receive the best care and treatment.’

Without the help of Chiswick Lifeboat and the care of the Swan Sanctuary, the goslings would not have survived because they were not old enough to fly away.

Chiswick RNLI lifeboat station is the second busiest in the UK and Ireland. Since The RNLI search and rescue service on the Thames started in 2002, Chiswick Lifeboat has attended over 3,700 incidents and rescued over 1,750 people. In 2021, Chiswick RNLI had 222 launches, helped 144 people and saved one life.

Image above: the baby goslings with others at the Swan Sanctuary 

Read more stories on The Chiswick Calendar

See also: Escaped falcon spotted around south west London

See also: Beavers could be reintroduced to SW London

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Andrea’s film review – The Lost City

The Lost City ⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Review by Andrea Carnevali

A reclusive romance novelist on a book tour with her cover model gets swept up in a kidnapping attempt that lands them both in a cutthroat jungle adventure. Out in cinemas now.

The Lost City tells the story of a writer of cheesy romance and adventure stories (Sandra Bullock), who finds herself victim of kidnap and is forced to embark on mission, not unlike the ones in her books, paired up with a man she doesn’t really like.

If this premise sounds familiar, is because you’re probably thinking of Romancing the Stone, which pretty much shares the same plot (but who cares when the target audience might not even have heard of it?)

Directors/co-writers (and siblings) Aaron Nee & Adam Nee are clearly trying to evoke those classic treasure-hunting capers from the ‘80s, ripping off ideas and themes left and right.

The film even starts with two people locked up in an old tomb surrounded by snake, in an obvious “homage” to Raiders of the Lost Ark.

It never really takes itself too seriously (though that should not really be an excuse for not making much sense), prioritising the comedy over the actual thrills and adventures. This may pay dividends when the jokes land, and some of them really do, alas the overall result is a mix bag because when the film runs out of steams (and laughs), all you’re with are some sub-standard action set pieces, which eventually make it look more like The Mummy with Brendan Fraser, than an actual Indiana Jones flick. For that we’re going to have to wait another year, and I’ve got my fingers crossed!

Mercifully, the top-notch cast saves the day. Next to the always likeable and reliable Sandra Bullock, Channing Tatum plays the hunky cover model from her books who, while he may look the part, is actually closer to being the damsel in distress rather than the dashing hero one might expect and in typical role-reversal fashion, he even take his shirt off a lot (in fact more than that, if you’re interested).

The two of them have good comedic timing and even if their appropriately awkward chemistry is a bit hit and miss (just like the rest of the film) and their bickering gets a tiny bit repetitive, there’s no denial that The Lost City rests on their shoulders and is eventually saved by them.

In a quite a random piece of miscasting (possibly intentional, though I couldn’t tell) Daniel Radcliffe plays the baddie of the piece: an annoying and rather petulant billionaire with a squeaky voice, who’s after the “lost city” from the title.

Even Brad Pitt has an extended cameo, which is fun even if it seems to belong to a different movie altogether.

To conclude, just like Uncharted a few months ago, Lost City ends up being another of those dispensable movies, with some good stars, enjoyable to watch in the moment (I was never bored), but just like its bland title, it is pretty uninspired and forgettable the moment you’ll leave the cinema (or more likely, turn off your streaming platform when it comes out in a few months).

For now though, it’s playing on the big screen.

Andrea Carnevali is a Bafta winning film maker who lives in Chiswick.

See all Andrea’s film reviews here: Film reviews by Andrea Carnevali

See all the latest stories: Chiswick Calendar News & Features

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